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Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts 



ANNUAL 
REPORT 




1975 





★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 






★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



The Ford - Blanchard home. The home of Capt. Cadwallader Ford 
who commanded the Wilmington Minutemen on Concord Day. 



rk 
rk 

he home of the Rev. Isaac Morrill, chaplain to the Massachusetts 
)rces in the French & Indian War, and one of the leaders in the 
idependence movement during the days before the Declaration of 
^dependence. 





★ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★if 



The 1776 House. This is believed to be the only building in the 
United States which exists today, and was raised on the day of the 
Declaration of Independence. 



3n ilemoriam 

Ralph G. Babcock 
John J. Burke 
Wavie M. Drew 
Gerald A. Fagan 
Ralph M. Plumer, Jr. 
Arnold L. Pratt 



Index 



Title Page 

Accepted Streets 61; 

Beautification Committee 22 

Bicentennial Commission 23 

Board of Appeals 50 

Board of Assessors 8 

Board of Health 38 

Board of Registrars 12 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 5 

Building Inspector 30 

Carter (Sarah D.J.) Lecture Fund 3I 

Cemetery Department 58 

Conservation Commission 29 

Constable 27 

Council on Aging 63 

Directory of Officials I4. 

Dog Officer 69 

Pire Department 28 

Highway Department 32 

Historical Commission 57 

Housing Authority 36 

Jury List 60 

Librarian 21 

Library Trustees 20 

Permanent Building Committee 37 

Planning Board 18 

Police Department 2k 

Public Buildings Department 35 

Recreation Commission i;2 

Redevelopment Authority 19 

School Committee 70 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 1|5 

Shawsheen Valley Technical School 80 

Solid Waste Disposal 59 

Superintendent of Schools 7U 

Town Accountant 120 

Town Clerk 10 

Town Collector I3 

Town Counsel 11+ 

Town Engineer 3U 

Town Manager 3 

Town Meetings & Elections Annual Town Meeting - March 1, 1975 86 

Special Town Meeting - June 23, 1975 II6 

Town Treasurer 9 

Tree Department 33 

Veterans Agent 69 

Water & Sewer Department 1^6 



1 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

■f- 



To the Citizens of Wilmin^on: 

Wilmington can be proud of the citizens, toth elected and appointed, 
who work on Committees. They are exerting a tremendous effort which 
reflects in our Town being more stable than many others in the 
Commonwealth. These citizen volunteers have helped produce a healthy 
and progressive commercial atmosphere in the area. 

We Selectmen are aware of the anxiety of the taxpayers in relation to 
our ever rising property tax buxden. The year 197? was a frustrating 
period of time world wide, nationally, as well as within our Town. 
The loss of buying power by our senior citizens, frustration of young 
folks trying to buy a home or even land for a home, and the continual 
inflation of prices which is becoming known as the greatest "rip-off" 
in history of man, all work to aggravate the tax burden. 

The year 197? saw "Anti-Snob Zoning" (Chapter 77U) appear in Wilmington. 
We hope this is behind us now. Solid waste disposal was studied by an 
excellent committee, as well as by professionals, who produced a report 
and recommendations which were turned down by the Town Meeting. 

The year 1976 will see the solution of many problems, such as solid 
waste, water supply and distribution, railroad bridges, the long talked 
about Route 129 By- Pass, and the proper distribution of the sewer system 
that will benefit, rather than damage the Town. 

We Selectmen express our appreciation for the help of the citizens with 
their suggestions and cooperation, and we extend our wishes to each of 
you for a healthy and prosperous New Year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. Daniel Gillis, Chairman 
James P. Banda 
George W. Boylen, Jr. 
Aldo A. Caira 
James R. Miceli 



2 



TOWIV OF WiLlVlIIsJGXOISJ 



MASSACHUSETTS OI887 



office: of the 

TO, wN MANAGER 



APEA cooe 617 
6sa-33rr 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

On behalf of all Boards, Committees and the employees of Wilmington, I present this annual report of the 
happenings and activities of your local government for the year just past. All organizations have some 
purpose. In private business, it is usiially to provide a product or service in exchange for a profit. This 
is a convenient criterion when evaluating the purpose of a business or any part of it. The purpose of local 
government however is to enhance the health, well-being and safety of its residents. We continuously analyze 
our progress and ability to fiilfill the purpose of local government and to that end develop goals and pro- 
grams for the benefit of the people who live within its boundary. To be more specific, the primary reasons 
and purpose of our local governments can be divided into the following categories: 

Services ; The most obvious purpose is to provide commTonity-wide services that are not otherwise available 
to residents. Schools, streets, police and fire protection, public works, health and recreational activities 
fall within this category. The decisions related to these services are the subject matter of the annual 
budgeting process which is jointly shared with my office, the Board of Selectmen, the Finance Committee and 
the vote of the people who attend the annual town meeting. These services are vital factors in the attrac- 
tiveness of our community as a place to live and as a place for business. 

Facilities : While generally in support of services, public facilities represent a community's investment in 
needed buildings, water works, parks, streets, sewers and related plans for future needs of the community. 

Regulations : Perhaps the most important function and ptirpose of town government relates to the exercise of 
its police powers. This is especially true in the case of land-use controls that limit certain types of 
residential and commercial development within its jurisdiction. We in government ask oujrselves and the 
inhabitants of Wilmington, when is a certain regulation or by-law or zoning law too restrictive. Are we 
sometimes passing laws that limit excessively an individual's right to the pursuit of happiness? The best 
use of government should be to provide an attractive and safe place to live and raise a family. We must 
frequently appraise our position and purpose in this regard and the vital part these laws play in the re- 
lationships of life. Local government should interfere as little as possible in the rights of the home- 
owner or business establishment. 

Administration : The purpose of this administration is to carry out the wishes of the inhabitants and of 
the Board of Selectmen by offering effective, businesslike operation of local government. In pursuit of 
this purpose the town manager is given general supervision over the property and business affairs of the 
community and over the expenditure of funds appropriated by it for municipal services. 

197$ Progress ; The Town during this past year undertook two very important and far reaching projects which 
will influence the growth of the Town for many years to come. The decision of the voters to acquire some 
122 acres of forest land will preserve this land for open space for all future generations. The other major 
decision was the vote to raise seven million dollars by bond issue to install a major segment of the sani- 
tary sewer system. This project will eventually affect eveiy home owner and business in Wilmington. 

I wish to acknowledge that the progress which has been made over the past year is due to the leadership 
provided by the Board of Selectmen, and the services have been of high qixality due to the professional 
attitude of our department heads and hard work by oiar employees. 

The Town of Wilmington will benefit most of all by yoixr presence at the Town Meeting. 



Respectfully submitted. 




Sterling C. Morris 
Town Mana^r 



3 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1, 197$ - 1976 



Board of Selectmen 



A. Daniel Gillis, Chaiiman 
James F. Banda 
George W. Boylen, Jr. 
Aldo A. Caira 
James R. Miceli 



Term 
Expires 

1978 
1977 
1977 
1978 
1976 



Town Manager 



Sterling C. Morris 



Moderator 



John M. Callan 



Annually 



School Committee 



John E. Nealon, Chaiiman 
John Brooks, Vice Chairman 
Harry J. Landers, Secretary 
Francis A. Ottati 
Francis J. Sullivan 
Richard W. Thackeray 



1976 
1977 
1977 
1978 
1978 
1976 



Superintendent of Schools 



Walter H. Pierce 



Finance Committee 



Thomas E. Casey, Chairman 
Richard D. Duggan, Vice Chairman 
Brian Rogers, Secretary 
Christian G. Bachman 
Richard W. Cogan 
Rodney E. Laughton 
Charles F. Mather 
Madelyn A. McKie 
Arthur F. Spear, Jr. 



1977 
1978 
1976 
1978 
1977 
1976 
1976 
1977 
1978 



I 



BOABDS, COMMITTEES AM) COMMISSIONS - JAMJARY 1, 1975 - 1976 



APPEAL, BOARD OF 

Bruce MaoDonald, Chairman 1977 

William A. Caperci I976 

George G. Roteriie I978 

Loiiis J. Brozyna, Associate 1978 

Peter Enos, Associate 1978 

Parker Hodgdon, Associate 1978 



ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 

Anthony E. Krzeminski , Principal 

Charles P. Lawrensen 

Roy P. McClanahan 

BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 
Paula O'Brien, Chairman 
Evelyn S. Burke 
Vonda I. Cram 
Hilda P. Nelson 
Dorothy J. Siteman 

BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION 
Robert A. Brown 
Fructuoso T. Cairasco 
Atwood E. Dickson 
Marguerite Elia 
Charles P. Kelley 



CARTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 

jj Made Ion C. Slater, Chairman 1976 

Julia Fielding 1977 

Mildred E. Neilson 1977 

Anne M. Rounds 1976 

Kenneth Wilson 1978 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Willis C. I^ford, Chairman I978 

William F. Cavanaugh I976 

Thomas H. McMahon 1977 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Joseph J, Kulig, Chairman 1976 

Alice W. Papaliolios, Vice Chairman 1977 

Arthur W. Biireau I976 

Nancy E. Kaufman I978 

Ursula M. Leahy 1978 

George H. Rushton 1977 

Joan M. Sadowski 1977 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Nema K. Miller, Chairman I976 

Lorraine Brozyna, Vice Chairman 1976 

Stephen Brennick, Treasurer 1976 

Sheldon Maga, Secretary I978 

Gladys A. Babine I978 

Arthur Bernard 1977 

Grace Bourbeau I977 

Arthur J. Daniels 1977 

Rose Gatta 1977 

James Shine 1978 

Irving H. Storms I976 



DRUG COMMITTEE 

Jocui D. Kritter, Chairman 

Carol A. Cooke, Secretary 

Michael DiGregorio 

Scott Kent 

Lester E. White 



HEALTH, BOARD OF 

Marion C. Boylen, Chairman 1976 

James J. Durkee 1977 

Joseph A. Paglia 1978 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Foster Balser I978 

Frank Curley 1977 

William G. Meyer I976 

Melinda Murphy 1976 

Adele Passmore I978 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

George W. Hooper, Chairman 1978 

Donald R. Garland, Vice Chairman I98O 

Barbara H. Larson 1976 

Leo M. Woodside 1977 

Lulu E. Sanborn I978 
(Rep. of State Housing Bd. ) 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Lionel M. Baldwin 1979 

Raymond A. McNamara 1977 

Ray A. York 1977 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

E. Hayward Bliss, Chairman 1976 

Shirley F. Callan, Vice Chm. & Secretary I978 

Philip B. Buzzell 1978 

Sally A. Harding 1976 

Evelyn M. Norton 1977 

Roland I. Wood 1977 

PARK & RECREATION COMMISSION 

Nancy C. DeWilde, Chairman 1978 

John P. Gushing, Vice Chairman 1976 

Paiil J. Bova, Secretary 1977 

Larry Noel 1977 

Francis Sferazza 1976 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Arthur R. Smith, Jr., Chairman 1978 

Albert J. Blackburn, Jr. 1976 

Joseph J. Hartka 1976 

David A. Holbrook 1978 

Edward E. Thompson 1977 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 
Richard V. Barry 
John F. Burke 
Richard K. Hayden 



PLAHmNG BOARD 

William G. Hooper, Jr. , Chairman 
Louis A. Maglio, Jr., Clerk 
Joel F. Gardiner 
William J. Hanlon 
Arthur E. Harding, Jr. 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

Raymond A. McNamara, Chairman 

Carl A. Backman, Jr. 

William P. Butt 

Sidney R. Kaizer 

Currie N. Johnson (State Member) 



1979 
1977 
1980 
1976 
1978 



1976 
1979 
1977 
1978 
1979 



REGIONAL VOCATIONAL/TECmriCAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Eugene L. Kritter 1977 
Frank H. McLean I976 



P. Talhot Emery, Chairman 
Robert L. Cavanaugh 
Mary G. Condrey 
Esther L. Russell, Clerk 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 
Robert Palmer 
Kenneth Motschmann 
Frank Tuttle 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Harold E. Melzar, Chairman 
Mary E. Denault, Secretary 
Arnold C. Blake 

WATER & SEWER COMMISSIONERS 
George R. Allan, Chairman 
Arnold C. Blake 
Paul P. Matulewicz; 

WASTE DISPOSAL SITE STUDY COMMITTEE 
Donald White, Chairman 
Dr. Betty Bigwood 
John M. Graney 
Clyde P. Shufelt 

WILMINGTON ELECTIONS OFFICERS 
Precinct 1 



Mary D'Eon, Warden 

Joan M. Lanzillo, Clerk 

Diaime M. Polizzotti, Dep. Clerk 

Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 

Alta Lyons, Dep. Inspector 

Edith Ann Graham, Inspector 

Dolores E. Romanski, Dep. Inspector 



1978 
1976 
1977 



1976 
1978 
1977 



1978 
1977 
1976 



Ann\ially 



Precinct 2 
Phyllis M. O'Leary, Warden 
Charlotte Stewart, Dep. Warden 
Evelyn S. Burke, Clerk 
Barbara H. Webber, Dep. Clerk 
Miriam H. Colucci, Inspector 
Lorita B. Bower, Dep. Inspector 
Eleanor Doyle, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 3 
Stanley Webber, Warden 
Basil L. Weatherbee, Dep. Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Clerk 
Anne M. Rounds, Dep. Clerk 
Mary E. Woods, Inspector 
Norinne M. Markey, Dep. Inspector 
Florence A. Balkus, Inspector 
Bemice A. Butler, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct k 
William H. Russell, Warden 
Sarah H. Cosman, Dep. Warden 
Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Clerk 
Mary H. O'Rourke, Dep. Clerk 
Doris V. Russell, Inspector 
Marjorie C. Kennedy, Dep. Inspector 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector 
Edith Cuoco, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct $ 
Jean Le favour. Warden 
Dora C. Ardolino, Dep. Warden 
Mildred Hillier, Clerk 
Margaret E. Blonigen, Dep. Clerk 
Carole A. Bailey, Inspector 
Elizabeth A. Blaisdell, Dep. Inspector 
Edith L. Poloian, Inspector 
Ruth S. Coursey, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 6 
Margaret L. Perry, Warden 
Estelle M. Bulger, Dep. Warden 
Barbara M. Cook, Clerk 
Nancy C. DeWilde, Dep. Clerk 
Diane H. Ryan, Inspector 
Patricia D. McNau^ton, Dep. Inspector 
Jean F. Howard, Inspector 
Elizabeth Andrews, Dep. Inspector 



Annual] 



6 




OFFICERS MB DEPABTMENT HEADS - JAMJARY 1, 197$ - 1976 



Accountajit 


Robert H. Peters 


Administrative Assistant 


Mary E, Denault 


Animal Inspsctor 


Joseph V. Balestrieri 


Assistant T'CV.'ii Manager 


Peter L. Holzmeister 


Building Inspector 


Charles P. Lawrenson 


Cemetery Superintendent 


Francis E, Downs 


Civil Defense Director 


Silverius J • Blonigen 


Constable 


A . John Imbimbo 


Dog Oiiicer 


Joseph V. Balestrieri 


Engineer 


Robert L. Higgins 


Fire Chief 


Arthur J. Boudreau 


Gas Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


Highway Superintendent 


Robert P. Palmer 


Ipswich River Watershed Commassion 


A. Daniel Gillis 


Librarian 


Philip W, Mericun 


Medical Agent, Board of Health 


Luisito Francisco, M.D. 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


Madelyn A. McKie 


Milk Inspector 


Ernest F. Romano 


Nurse, Public Health 


Anne Butters, R.N. 


Plumbing Inspector 


William R. Hanrison 


Public Building Superintendent 


Roy P. McClanahan 


Police Chief 


Paul J . I^mch 


Recreation Director 


Ronald Swasey 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


Martin P. Farrell 


Town Clerk 


Esther L. Russell 


Town Clerk (Assistant) 


Margaret A. Wagstaff 


Town Collector 


Marion C. Murphy 


Town Collector (Deputy) 


Catherine P. Lindmark 


Town Counsel 


Alan Altman 


Town Sanitarian 


Ernest P. Romano 


Town Treasurer 


Mary Eo Dena\ilt 


Town Treasurer (Assistant) 


Elizabeth R, Fosgate 


Tree and Moth Superintendent 


Thomas 0. Sullivan 


Veterans ' Agent 


Paul A. Farrell 


Veterans' Grave Officer 


Paul A. Farrell 


Water Superintendent 


Kenneth C. Motschmann 


Wire Inspector 


Charles L. Webster 




Student government officials in action 



7 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATIOIT - I976 FISCAL YEAB 



Total Appropriations ^Taxation) 


$11,262,U75.00 


Total Appropriations (Available Funds) 


1.1,97,207.00 


Total Deficits 


132,127.28 


School L^lnch Program 


1|0,608.00 


Free Public Libraries 


6,1+13.25 


Special Education Grant Chapter 766 


2U,2i|0.00 


Audit of Municipal Accounts 


2,160.55 


Amount Necessaiy to Satisfy Final Court Judgments 


12,800.00 


County Retirement Assessment 


238,897.00 


County Tax 


U36,0i5.77 


State Recreation Areas 


81,985.36 


Metropolitan Districts Area Charge 


98,040.93 


Mass. Bay Transporation Authority 


19U, 305.00 


Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 


1,739.10 


Air Pollution Control Districts 


1,661.59 


Metropolitan Area Planning Coimcil 


2,565.30 


Underestimates 


992. U8 


Ipswich Water Shed 


2,593.67 


Overlay of Current Year 


2i5,U59.i+6 


Gross Amount to be Raised 




Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 




1976 Fiscal year Estimated Receipts from Local Aid & Agency Funds $ 2 , 659 » ^4-60 . 76 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 


ii89,639.52 


Licenses 


2,000.00 


Fines 


1,200.70 


Special Assessments 


23,962.89 


General Government 


7,606.60 


Protection of Persons and Property 


214,131.00 


Health and Sanitation 


1;, 101. 00 


Highways 


1+22.41 


School (Local receipts of School Committee) 


2,760.00 


Libraries 


750.85 


Cemeteries 


9,iUi.oo 


Farm Animal and Machine Excise 


257.69 


Interest 


126,930.83 


Ambulance Service 


u, 307.13 


Sewer Revenue 


53,804.13 


Miscellaneous Receipts 


983.86 


Workmen's Compensation and Insurance 


5,504.82 


Dog License Reimbursement 


3,648.12 


Matching Funds Civil Defense Rescue Truck 


7,666.68 


Chapter 1+92 as Amended by Chapter 1+36 of 1975 


74,318.00 


Overestimates 


63,409.43 


Voted from Available Funds 


1,497,207.00 


Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation 



$12,759,682.00 



1,492,60^.74 
$14,252,28^.74 



5.063.214.42 
$ 9.189.072.32 



8 



Recapitulation - 1976 Fiscal Year (continued) 



Personal property $ U , 700 , 605 . 00 @ 6U.00 per M $ 300,838.72 
Real Estate $138,878,6^0.00 @ 61|.00 per M 8.888.233.60 

$ 9,189,072.32 

Items not entering into the determination of the Tax Rate; 

1. Betterments and Special Assessments added to Taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest 9,i|7U.27 
t. Water Betterments and Interest 'J,OlU'Uh 
c. Sewer Betterments and Interest 9,06l4..8i; 

2. Water Liens added to Taxes 21,729.58 

Total $ U7,283.13 

Total of all other Commitments $ 9,236, 355. U5 



Town Treasurer 



Cash on hand - July 1, I97U $ 661,310. I6 

Receipts - fiscal 1975 26,837,158.91 

Disbursements - fiscal 1975 26,557»555.Ul 

Cash on hand - June 30, 1975 91+0,913.66 

Since March 197U we have not found it necessary to borrow any money in anticipation of revenue. 
Investments ; 

During the calendar year 1975, the program of investing idle funds from Bond Issues and General Funds was 
continued with a resulting profit of $108,770. Interest rates during the year varied from 5% to 9 3/h% on 
our investments depending on the market. 

Funds received during the year from the Federal Revenue Sharing program were invested also with a return of 
$li|,5lO. Since the receipt of Federal Revenue Sharing funds, we have earned an additional sum of $100,861 
by investing these fmds prior to actual expenditure. 



9 



Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 1|6, General Laws as amended; 

Births - final figure for I97I1 

Births - actTially recorded to date for 1975 

Marriage Intentions recorded for 1975 
Marriages recorded for 1975 

Deaths recorded for 1975 



221 
209 

163 

nh 

98 



Chapter t|6, Section l5; 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical 
officers applying therefor, "blanks for the retixm of births as reqioired hy law. 

Chapter lll|, Section k^: 

Seventeen burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Health in 
1975* Seven out-of-state deaths reported and filed in this office. Seven Wilmington Veterans died out 
of town and were bioried in Wildwood Cemetery. 

TOWN EECOHDS 

Permits and certificates of registration for the storaige of infl^nimables; 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license 
in the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about 
March l5. If not registered by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing authority after a public 
hearing. 



Inflammables 

Uniform Commercial Code recordings 
Uniform Commercial Code terminations 
Federal Tax Lien recordings 
Dog Licenses issued as of January 

throu^ December 1975 
Duplicate dog tags sold for the year 1975 
Business Certificates recorded 
Business withdrawals 
Fish & Game Licenses 
Pole locations 
Medical Registration 
Bazaars and Raffles 



97 
2h3 
3U 
32 

1836 
2k 

35 

3 

102i| 
16 

6 



10 



other Services; 



Keep mi.nutes of Annual and Special Town Meetings up-to-date. (Certify same upon request.) 

Town Clerk has complete charge of elections. Records election results. 

Send State Election results to State Secretaiy forthwith. 

Keep Jury List up-to-date. Draw jurors when court orders come throu^. 

Certified an undetermined niamber of Births, Marriages and Deaths. 

Certified an undetermined number of Births (Abstract forms) - used for school entrances, 

drivers' licenses, out-of-state travel and job applications. 
Proof of residence by letter or card - used for college entrance; undetermined number. 
Miscellaneous sales of books and maps - imdetermined number. 

Receive writs against the Town and forward copies of same to the Town Coimsel. 

Occasionally appear in court for the Town, when summoned - producing all papers and maps required. 
Complete notes of the Town as received from the Town Treasurer - after approval by the Selectmen. 

Certify same. 
Record Board of Appeal decisions. 
Keep a file of decisions by the Town Counsel. 
Record minutes and decisions of the Planning Board. 
Keep a file of Annual Reports. 

Keep a file of all Zoning and Town By-Law changes as approved by the Attorney General. 
Swear Town officers to the faithful performance of their duties and keep a record of same. 
Accept business registrations and keep a file for public use. 

Prepare the Town ballot for the voting machines and order the printing of same. 

The use of voting machines has made our elections more efficient, and the hours we work are much 

shorter, and the results of the election are known earlier. 
Supervise payrolls for town meeting and election workers. 

Supervise the distribution and filing of nomination papers and the reports of campaign and political 
finance expenditures. 

The Town Clerk, in her capacity as a justice of the peace, certified an undetermined number of legal 
papers for town officers. Married couples by appointment, in her home when presented with the proper 
credentials. 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, 
I have - 

Met with the Board on regular meetings and special meetings. 
Kept the minutes of the Board up-to-date. 
Supervised the Annual census by mail. 
Kept the voting list up-to-date. 

Registered voters during office hours and met with the board for evening sessions and 

certification of nomination papers. 
Supervised the printing of the "Persons' Listed" book. 




Silver Lake beach activities 
11 



Board of Registrars 

In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3» of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars 
were held on the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and the conduov of 
business. Under Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958, this meeting is open to the puhlic and the press, 
and it so posted in the Town Hall. 

The Board held registration periods as are required "by law for the Annual Town Election and one 
Special Town Meeting. 

The Town Clerk has attended Massachusetts Town Clerk conferences in order to keep up with the 
constantly changing election laws. 

In order to keep the voting list as up-to-date as possible, the Board annually compares the voting 
list with the annual census. If a voter's name does not appear in the census, it is subject to removal 
from the voting list. Drop letters are sent to these people advising them to get in touch with the Town 
Clerk. 

New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take residence in 
the town. Any change of address within the town diiring the year should be brought to the attention of 
the Board of Registrars so that yoixr name will not be removed from the voting list inadvertently. 

1975 State Census (considered 'official') 17,656. 

1975 number of dogs listed from census information 2367. 

Registered voters as of January 1, 1975: 

Democrats 3323 

Republicans 1057 

Undeclared 3664 

Total as of May 27, 1975 » after census had been compiled 80Uh 

Voted to take 1976 Annual Town Census by mail. 




Wilmington l\/linutemen entering Concord, l\/lass. 



12 



Town Collector 



COMMITMENTS - 1975 

1976 Real Estate 

1976 Water Liens 

1976 Sewer Liens 

1976 Apport, Street Betterments 

Committed Interest 

1976 Apport. Water Betterments 

Committed Interest 

1976 Apport. Sewer Betterments 

Committed Interest 

1976 Personal Property 

1976 Farm 

1975 Excise 

1975 Apport. Water Betterments 
Committed Interest 
I97I+ Excise 
1973 Excise 

1975 Apport. Street Betterments - Paid in full 
Committed Interest 

1975 Apport. Water Betterments - Paid in fiill 

Committed Interest 

1975 Unapport. Street Betterments 

1975 Unapport. Water Betterments 

Amtulance 

TOTAL COMMITMENTS 

COLLECTIONS - 1975 



Real Estate 
Water Liens 
Sewer Liens 

Apport. Street Betterments 
Committed Interest 
Apport. Water Betterments 
Committed Interest 
Apport. Sewer Betterments 
Committed Interest 
Personal Property- 
Farm 
Excise 

Apport. Street Betterments 
Committed Interest 
Apport. Water Betterments 
Committed Interest 
Unapport. Street Betterments 
Unapport. Water Betterments 
Interest & Costs 
Municipal Lien Cert. & Cert. 
Ambulance 

Advertising Charges 



1226 

$U, 232,1+31. 86 

16,733.59 
66.11 
6,08U.62 
2,807.86 
U, 053.01 
1,575.71+ 
5,150.48 
3,9ll|.36 
151,973.10 
116.38 



Paid in full 



Paid in full 



Dissolving Betterments 



ml 

$3,596,511.07 
1,962.32 

15U.53 
I109.20 
126.26 
899.50 
302.37 



118,658.07 

U57,683.1|8 
7,115.9U 
39.99 
2,656.18 
55.U7 
2,979.00 
6,14+9.30 

21,232.21; 

2,162.00 
1+,U23.25 

21+. 25 



$8,888,233.60 
21,750.81 

66.11 

6,1+15.88 

3,058.39 

5,039.16 

1,975.28 
5,150.1+8 
3,9li+.36 
301,037.12 
232.75 
383,773.31+ 
11+0.09 
28.19 
73,706.1+9 
10,025.81 
2,111.51+ 
1+8.96 
2,625.12 
55.1+7 
17,916.61+ 
115,21+6.31+ 
8,1+90.00 

$9,851,01+1.93 

OTHER YEARS 

$ 85,038.6U 

563.13 

7i+.78 
71+. 77 
372.25 
113. 81+ 



861.07 
229,276.71 



TOTAL COLLECTIONS 



i, 965,126.72 



13 



Town Counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my ireport as Town Counsel 
covering the year 1975. 

A. On January 1, 1976, there were pending the following actions hy or against the Town (exclusive of 
actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax 
lien foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court and petitionb for abatement before the Appellate Tax 
Board*). 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assesment of 

damages for land taking) 

Barvey Lobdell v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity for appeal for 
variance by zoning by laws) 

Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) 

Joseph Scaro etal y. County of Middlesex etal, Middlesex Superior Coturb (Petition for assessment of 
riamages for land taking) 

Town of Wilmington v. John Benevento etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Action to restrain the removal 
of soil, loam, sand or gravel) 

John J. Elia v. Bruce MacDonald etals, Middlesex Superior Coiurb (Petition for writ or certiorari 
concerning revocation of a gasoline storage license) 

John E. Hayward, etal v. Co^Inty of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assess- 
ment of damages for land taking) 

John E. Hayward, etal v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assess- 
ment of damages for land taking) 

Hillcrest Realty Inc. v. A. Daniel Gillis etal, Middlesex Superior Co\irt (Appeal of decision of 
Planning Board denying approval of definitive subdivision) 

Morton Grant etals v. Robert E. Jennings etal, Middlesex Superior Couirfc (Appeal from decision of 
the Board of Appeals) 

Robert Stevens, Tr. v. Town of Wilmington and Planning Board, Land Court (Petition for registration 
and claim to Swain Court - Private Way) 

Town of Wilrnington v. Lee A. Ward etal. Fourth District Co\irt of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for 
property damage to a police cruiser) 

Town of Wilmington v. Frank C. Powers etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for contempt for 
failure to comply with final decree) 

Town of Wilmington v. Boston and Maine Railroad, TJ. S. District Cotirt - Bankruptcy (in- re Boston 
and Maine Railroad Reorganization Proceedings - Claim for real estate taxes due) 

1U 



IP 



Ro'bert V. Meserve etal Tmstees for the property of Boston and Main Railroad Corporation v, Tovm 
of Vilming-ton - Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damans) 

John J. Elia Tr. v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages) 

Richard D. Zambemardi etal v. Town of Wilmington Board of Selectmen, Middlesex Superior Couirb 
(Suit in equity for declaratory judgment to determine the validity of betterment assessment) 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph A. LaCreta, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity to enforce 
the zoning by law) 

Application of Richard Anderson v. Town of Wilmington Board of Conciliation and Arbitration (Petition 
for hearing before Board of Conciliation and Arbitration re - dismissal) 

Harry S. Sukeforth etals Trs. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Coirrt 
(Petition for assessment of damages) 

Else M. Lanois v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages 
for land taking) 

William L. Schronnn etals v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, etal, Middlesex Superior Court 
(Bill in equity claiming damages and specific relief concerning incidents related to sewer construction) 

Robert Lewis v. Esther L. Russell etal. Middlesex Superior Coiirt (Petition for writ of mandamus to 
require Town Clerk to issue kennel licenses) 

Sanborn Brothers, Inc. v. Town of WilTnington, District Court of Lowell (Action for property dama^ - 
negligence ) 

Gus Sola V. Town of Wilmington, Foiirth District Coitrt of Eastern Middlesex (Action in contract of 
employment under Mass. G.L.C. i+1, lllF) 

Clarence Spinazola v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) 

Robert L. Stevens v. William G. Hooper, Jr. etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal under C.Ul, 
s . 8IBB from the failure of the Planning Board to properly endorse a plan) 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Coiirt (Bill of Complaint for 
Declaratory Relief as to the Validity of a Sewer Betterment Assessment) 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill of Complaint for 
Declaratory Relief as to the Validity of Assessment of Sewer Use Charges, for Recovery of Damages and for 
Injunctive Relief) 

George Anderson etal v. Town of Wilmington etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim 
for personal injury) 

School Teacher v. The Wilmington School Committee, Equal Employment Opportimtiy Commission (Complaint 
of discrimination as to benefits) 

John J. Lyons etal v. Town of Wilmington, Land CoTirt (Complaint to determine validity and extent 
of the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington) 

George W. Lloyd etal v. Jackson Brothers, Inc. and Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
( Complaint for alleged damages resulting from diversion of water) 

Pallotta & Son Development, Inc. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
( Pe tition for assessment of damages) 



15 



James Zaccagpiini v. James Marsi, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint alleging libel by police office: 
in the performance of his duties) 

Alfred T. Drinkwater etal Trustees v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for 
assessment of damages) 

Edward W. Powers etal. v. Town of Milton etal. Supreme Judicial Court (Declaratory judgment to 
deteimine constitutionality of Civil Service Statute) 

John D. Cooke v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages) 

Richard J. Hamish etal v. Bruce MacDonald etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of 
Board of Appeals) 

John V. Kunigenas, etals v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petitioi 
for assessment of damages) 

Stepaji Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement 
of sewer betterment assessment) 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement 
of sewer use charge) 

Town of WilTnington v. Barry J. Mulholland, Fotirth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for 
property damage to town dump truck) 

Town of Wilmington v. Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company Third Party Action - Middlesex 
Superior Court (Action of contract for instirance indemnity) 

Town of Wilmington v. Jean-Cor Construction Corp., etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex 
(Claim for damages caused by trespass, conversion and destruction of town owned property and well field) 

■*<^ere are pending as of January 1, 1976, i+3 separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate 
Tax Board, many involving claims for several different years. 

B. (l) During the year 1975» the following new actions were brought against the Town of Wilmington 
or its officers or agents: 

Alice S. Brown v. Town of Wilmington, Land Coxrrt (Petition for assessment of damages for land 
taking) 

Fred T. Corum etal v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Coturt (Petition 
for assessment of damages for land taking) 

Donald C. Eaton etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Covxt (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) 

Rosaline T. Abi-Ezzi v. Wilmington School Committee etal, Massachusetts Conimission Against 
Discrimination (Claim for payment of maternity benefits) 

Carl E. Hussey v. Town of Wilmington etals, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination 
(claim against Town for discrimination in awarding contract) 

Marie Mack v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court , (Petition for 
assessment of damages for land taking) 

Austin L. Rounds v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Coujrb (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) 

Joseph J. Salpietro etal v. Robert E. Shelley etal, Middlesex Superior Co^lrt (Claim for personal 
injury and property damage) 



16 



Alice Papaliolios v. A. Daniel Gillis, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for invasion 
of privacy and defamation) 

Henry Freedman, Trustee in Baiikruptcy of Glen Pines, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, U. S. Bankrupt cy 
Court (Complaint for tiimover of funds assigned to Town pursuant to Subdivision Control Law) 

B. (2) Xhiring the year 1975j 'the following new actions were trought by or on behalf of the Town: 

Town of Wilmington v. Richard Anderson, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill to vacate award of Board of 
Conciliation and Arbitration) 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert E. Palmer, Foiorth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for 
p rop erty damage to fire truck) 

A. Daniel Gillis, etal v. Antonio J. Tambone, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal of the decision 
of the Board of Appeals ^Trajiting a comprehensive permit (Chapter 77U of the Acts of I969). 

C. During the year 1975 » "the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed of: 

Town of Wilmington v. Lee A. Ward etal, Four-th District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of by 
payment of $1,885 to the Town to reimburse for property damage) 

Town of Wilmington v« Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company - Third Party Action, Middlesex 
Superior Court (Disposed of by filing stipulation of dismissal and payment of contribution in claim 
for firefighter v. Town) 

Gus Sola V. Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of by payment 
of execution in the amount of $$,000 together with contribution from first party insurer) 

John J. Elia, Trustee v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by payment of 
exe cution of $2,750 which funds have been assigned to the Town) 

Town of Wilmington v. Barry J. Mulholland, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of 
by trial and payment to the Town after execution of the sxm of $l,331.UO) 

Application of Richard Anderson v. Town of Wilmington, Board of Conciliation and Arbitration 
(Disposed of by award to petitioner and Town's appeal to Middlesex Superior Court to vacate award) 

Henry Freedman, Trustee in Bankruptcy of Glen Pines, Inc, v. Town of Wilmington, U. S. Bankruptcy 
Co\irt (Disposed of by agreement and order to pay $2, $00 to Trustee in Bankruptcy) 




Student government Planning Board officials 



17 



Planning Board 



This year, as in previous years, the Planning Board has been extremely busy with general planning as well 
subdivision planning. The Planning Board generally meets on the first and third Tuesdays of each month fori 
planning purposes, and the second and fourth Tuesdays for subdivision work. 

This year the Board regretfully accepted the resignation of Mr. Robert Leahy. The Board would like to expr«( 
its gratitude for his many years of service both as a responsible board member and as the clerk of the Boarfl 
Replacing Mr. Robert Leahy, the Board welcomes Mr. Joel Gardiner. 

Planning Consultants 

This past year, as in 197U» the Board contracted the services of Thomas Associates to continue its studies 
in two areas. The first area is the completion of the revision of the Planning Board's Rules ajid Regulatiojt 
Governing the Subdivision of Land, The second area was to supply technical information to the Board re- 
garding the proposed multi-unit housing development. The Board wishes to express its thanks and apprecia- 
tion to Thomas Associates for its valuable contribution to the Planning Board. 

The Board is considering contracting the services of a consultant, Alan M. Voorhees Associates, for the 
purpose of studying lajid use along the various alternatives of the proposed Route 129 By-Pass. The study 
will cover various areas such as zoning of the land along the roadway, sign control, landscaping and varioutt 
other potential environmental impacts. 

Planning Intern 

The Planning Intern, Mr. Roger Vatkins, has successfully completed last year's work of reorganization of 
office material and information. Mr. Watkins has also been working with various people in a number of 
planning areas. Some of the areas in which he has been working are the revisions of the Planning Board 
Rules and Regulations, the Community Development Block Grant application and the proposed multi-unit housing) 
development. The latest project Mr. Watkins has been involved with is the proposed Route 129 By-Pass. He 
is a member and the Planning Board liaison to the Route 129 By-Pass working coimnittee. Mr. Watkins is 
presently attending Tufts University and will be graduating this May with a Master's Degree in planning and 
policy. 

EVEUTS OCCURRING DURING THE YEAR ; 

A. Nmber of Plans Recorded 

There were 1|6 plans recorded by the Board this past year. This is slightly lower than last 
year's figure of 53- There were i;2 plans approved, two plans were disapproved and two plans 
were withdrawn. One of the most controversial and important plans reviewed by the Board was 
the proposed multi-unit development plan. After reviewing this plan carefiilly, the Board 
passed on its recommendations to the Board of Appeals who had jiirisdiction of the proposal. 

B. Meetings and Conferences 

1. This past year the Planning Board has met with a mimber of citizens of the Town, 
representatives of various boards and departments on planning issues. 

2. The Board attended the Fall meeting of Region V-A of the Massachusetts Fedeiration of 
Planning Boards. The main emphasis of this meeting was a Planned Unit Development ajid what 
effects it had on a V-A community. 

3. The Board attended an Energy Conference which dealt with various ideas on how towns 
could conserve energy. 

18 I 



k. There have been niomerous meetings this past year that the Board has attended and 
provided information for on such topics as Low, Moderate and Elderly Housing; Community 
Development Act; the proposed high school; the Ipswich River Watershed and the Route 129 
By-Pass proposal. 

The purpose of attending and holding meetings with various boards, agencies and citizens 
is to achieve a well-roimded approach to planning in various areas as well as achieving 
as much citizen participation as possible. 

C. Important Votes 

1. The Board elected William Hooper as Planning Board Chairman and Louis Maglio as clerk 
for the Board. 

2. In April of 1975 the Board voted to amend the Planning Board Rules and Regulations ajid 
to substitute a new set of Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land in the 
Town. 

The Board is appreciative of the valuable contributions made by Mary Deislinger, the Planning Board 
Secretary, and Robert Higgins, the Town Engineer, toward the successful operation of the Board. The Board 
al SO wish-GS "to 6xp3?6ss i"ts gxa.'biijU.d.B for "biie coopeD?a-"fcion "that ths Town iDoairdSy comnLLssions and. coimiLL't'toGs 
have displayed throughout the past year. 



Redevelopment Authority 



The Wilmington Redevelopment Authority' s continuing p3?ogress with the Jewell Industrial Park on Eames 
Street has resulted in the sale of several acres of land. Locating or expanding in the area is Altron, 
Inc. a manufacturer of printed circuit boards who has under construction a 30,000 sq. ft. facility on 
6.1[|.2 acres of land. The new facility will house approximately 300 employees and, at the same time, 
Altron will maintain their present facility in Industrial Way consisting of 10,000 sq. ft. and employing 
approximately 100 people. 

Another firm with construction underway in the Park is JBF Corporation which is involved in the research 
and development of oil skimmers for environmental pollution. Their facility is being constructed on a 2.5 
acre site and will employ approximately $0 people. 

The Commonwealth has encouraged and supported this type of urban development for employment and tax base 
purposes and is pleased with the progress made by the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority. 

Jewell Manufacturing Company has done an exceptional job in upgrading the property and setting high stand- 
ards which require conformity in architect'ural design, landscaping and limiting factors on signs. 

The Wilmington Redevelopment Authority anticipates continued sales of several more acres in the Industrial 
Park in the near future and will strive to encourage industry which will be beneficial both economically 
and ecologically to the community. 



19 



Library Trustees 



The Board of Library Trustees, listed in the front of this annual Town Report, hereby report to the 
citizens of Wilmington by means of an informative narrative and library statistics by our Director 
Philip V. Meriam. 

The statistics and narrative speak for themselves. We as trustees need add no more except to repeat 
that we feel that the total library service represents an intangible community investment. We thank 
many and all who have helped us this past year with o\ir policy of development and service to the people 
of Wilmington, We intend to continue this commitment. 

LIBRARY STATISTICS 

for the calendar year January 1 - December 3I » 1975 

American Library Association Form 



Library: 

Town and State: 

Library Director: 

Date of founding: 

Population: 19?^ 

Number of agencies: 

Number of days open during the year: 

Hours open each week: 

Number of volumes beginning of the year 197?! 

Number of volumes purchased during the year: 

Number of volumes added as gifts: 

Number of volumes withdrawn during the year: 

Number of voliimes as of December 3I > 1975 

A/V materials: 

Newspapers: 

Periodicals: 

Prints: 

Circulation: 

Adult: 67,617 Children: kO,321 111: 

A/V: 5.15U Periodicals: 3,21? Prints: 
Circulation per capita: 
Appropriations and income: 
Per capita expendit-ures: 
Reference questions: 
Interlibrary loans: 

Requests from other libraries: 

Received from other libraries: 
Circtilation figures: 

1970 

1971 

1972 

1973 

197i+ 

1975 



305 
99ii 



Wilmington Memorial Library 
Wilmington, Massachusetts 
Philip W. Meriam 
189'1 
17,800 
Main Library 
302 
69 

50,213 

7,650 
196 

i,9U5 
56,iiU 

13 
231 
165 



117,612 
6.61 
$161,099 
« 9.05 

3,689 



39 
UOO 

98,298 
93,750 
84,652 
99,183 
102,186 
117,612 



20 



Librarian 



In accordance with the statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the by-laws of the Town of 
Wilmington, I hereby submit my report with its accompanying statistics for the year 1975: 

The sedentary image of the Memorial Library disappeared! The Library's circulation surpassed 117,600. 
Reference activity increased to 3>689, and adult services acquired additional depth and a higher degree 
of sophistication. The daily patron demanded and received more business and legal infonuation, more 
consumer facts, and relied heavily on the Memorial Library for his own and his family's needs for 
educational and recreational material. The circulation of the library's stock-in-trade - books - was 
stimulated by staff prepared book reviews which appeared in the Town Crier. The Libraiy offered passes 
to local museums, a free exchange of sewing patterns, an opportunity to exchange Christmas catalogs, or 
free food and merchandise coupons; it offered free feature films for the entire family, and continued to 
develop its circulating collection of American art reproductions. 

The Memorial Library started several long range projects. The Town's newspapers were indexed to provide 
access to historical material. A Library Park for outside activities is on the drawing boards. A human 
and social services directory for the town is in the process of development. Consideration is being 
given to circulating original art, and to developing an exchange of paperbacks and puzzles. A grant from 
the Massachusetts Bicentennial Commission has made possible the fixmishing of the library's Bicentennial 
Room during 1976. This room will contain Wilmington's historical material, and the collection and 
accessibility to it are viewed as one of the library's important functions. 

Much of this activity has been visible to the patron, but much of it has not. The Technical Services 
Department handles the buying, processing, cataloging, and accounting for material acquired by the library. 
An estimated count of 10,000 items were handled by this vital department. Statistics reveal that 7»697 
books and materials were added to the collection, and 2I4J4 subscriptions to various newspapers and magazines 
were checked- in. What appears to be simple to the observer is in fact not the case, and a great deal of 
credit must go to the library's behind-the-scenes detailed work. 

The Library is most observed in its work with the children of the town. The activity calendar is crowded 
with special events, pre-school story hours, classroom visits, films, puppet shows, book making, holiday 
events, or lectures on children's literature. Something is always going on, or is in the works. Perhaps 
nowhere else has the library's traditional image so completely disappeared. It can be said that the 
children of the town are acquiring the "library habit" early, thoroiighly, and pleasantly. The whole area 
of children's services has been outstanding. 

The employment of C.E.T.A. personnel has been of tremendous practical assistance, and the threatened 
collapse of this federally- sponsored program poses real problems to the library in terms of staffing, 
assignments, programs and activities. The library has followed a deliberate policy of development and 
expanded service to the town. This year was marked by increased demand for goods and services. The 
expectations have been raised, and perhaps have been tak;en for granted. With the predicted loss of C.E.T.A. 
the future's expectations remain uncertain at best. It must be stated emphatically that C.E.T.A. is not a 
"make-work" program, and the jobs done by Joyce Drew, Merrill Poloian, and Stanley Hollis are important. 
Robert Eddy a former C.E.T.A. employee is missed in the Reference Department. These individuals have 
contributed immeas\irably to the children's programs, to the handling of library materials, to the indexing 
of historical material, and to other special projects. 



21 



The regular staff did not change during 1975. Barbara White and Beatrice Yankowski did yeomanlike 
service in the Adult Department; Susan MacDonald found her niche in the Children's Department after fovoc 
years work in acq\iisitions. Loiiise Balser, Sarah Rueter, and Tina Molesevich ran their respective depart- 
ments with grace and efficiency. Two staff members, Elliot Drew and Judy Weinberg, started their gradixate 
work at Simmons Library School, and Bemie Rivers kept the flow of books and library materials moving. 
The library participated in a federally- sponsored work-study program with the Middlesex Community College. 
Barbara Cram is with this program and ciirrently serves in the Adult Department. There has been no t\im- 
over with the young people working after school and they, the library pages, have been faithful to their 
tasks. To all of these staff members goes the credit for a highly successful year. 

It is customary to thank others as well. The various gifts by townspeople are gratefxilly acknowledged. 
Four fathers of the Wob\im Street School, James Sarrette, Gregory Phillips, Don Logan, and Edward Thompson 
who together with Joseph Connelly, principal of the school, conceived ajid executed the Wilmington electronn 
map deserve special mention. This map which shows the important civic and historical sites of the town wa 
presented to the library in December of 1975* 

The contributions of the Libraiy Trustees are gratefully acknowledged by the Library Director and Staff. 
The understanding and mutual cooperation between the Library Director and other town officials are certai] 
to be noted with appreciation. Mr. Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager, encouraged the library's new ventx 
Mr. Peter Holzmeister, Assistant Town Manager, assisted with the library's participation with the C.E.T.A. ' 
program, and the successful application for a State Bicentennial grant. Mr. Barry Garden, former chairman 
of the Town's Bicentennial Commission, assisted, and his work is to be acknowledged. The Library staff 
also worked closely with Dr. George Eisenberg and Beverly Shea, the new High School librarian to coordinat 
and improve school and library relationships. 

Library statistics don't tell the whole story. It has been a busy year. It has been a successfixl year. 
The library has done its job I It has been responsive I It has provided opportunity. It will continue to 
lead and to respond. It will do its job. 



Beautification Committee 



The Beautification Committee consists of a five-member board. We are in our second year of operation. 

We are extremely pleased with our accomplishments over the past year, as we feel that our expanded 
efforts in the area of flower planting, the piirchase of additional Christmas decorations, projects in 
schools, parks and historical sites, etc., has helped to enhance the appearance of our Town. 

We are currently working cooperatively with the Wilmington Women's Club on a Bicentennial project. Our 
projected plans for the coming year are to broaden our range through continued work with the School 
Department in an endeavor to reach the youth of our coimnimity. 

We gratefully acknowledge the help of all who assist us in ovoc endeavors. 



22 



Bicentennial Commission 



During omx past busy year, the Wilmington Bicentennial Commission is happy to make this report to the Town 
of Wilmington. 

On April 19, 197$» "the Commission held ceremonies on the Town Common to mark "Patriots Day". This program 
was held at 2:30 a.m. and over ^00 people were on hand to see our Minutemen off to Concord. The weather 
being very cold, damp and rainy, did not dampen the spirit of the Town. Church bells rang, and a horse 
ran to the Common with a messenger to send our men off to fight in Concord. A very historic event for 
Wilmington. 

Also that same month the Wilmington Bicentennial Commission sponsored along with the Council of Ch-urches 
"A Cry For Freedom", which was very successftil. 

The following month in May with the help of various town organizations, the Wilmington Bicentennial 
j Commission sponsored the "Colonial Arts and Life Festival" along with Wilmington Minutemen. This fair 
i included many aspects of colonial life. Following this fair on the same day we saw, and participated in 
i the Liberty Pole Parade, along with numerous minutemen companies throughout the state. Former member 

Cathy Filipowicz played the part of "Miss Liberty". 

The Wilmington Bicentennial Commission has also seen the approval of the Bicentennial Room in our Town 
library. This program was in conjunction with the Library Board of Trustees. The commission wishes to 
thank the Library Board of Trustees, Mr. Philip Meriam and Assistant Town Manager, Peter Holzmeister, for 
their excellent work in compiling the necessary information, for making this room possible. 

During this year we have lost five "veteiran" members of the Bicentennial Commission. These people have been 
on this commission since its formation. Chairman Barry Garden, Barbara Cogan, Sarah Cosman, Marilyn Dom- 
feld and Cathy Filipowicz. These people worked many long hours and now we must say goodbye to them. Again 
thank you very much for all you have done. 

iAlso we welcome: Robert Brown, Rudy Carrasco, Charles Kelley and Atwood Dickson. Marge Elia will be 
serving for her third year. 
The Wilmington Bicentennial Commission would like to thank every one for their help during this past year. 
We look forward to our Nation's 200th Anniversary and deem it an honor to serve this Town on this very 
important year, 1976. 




High School athletic program 



23 



Police Department 



ABEESTS 

Assault & Battery 30 

Auto Theft 17 

Breaking & Entering J+6 

Disorderly Conduct 32 

Forgery 1 

Larceny 87 

Marijuana 20 

Non Support 23 

Receiving Stolen Property 12 

Rottery 1 

Sex Offenses 2 

Vandalism 21 

Violation of Liquor Laws 20 

All Other Offenses 206 

MOTOR VEHICLE ARRESTS 

Driver's License Violations 39 

Endangering 39 
Leaving the Scene After Causing Property 

Damage 9 

Operating Under the Influence of Liquor 70 

Unregistered- Uninsured Motor Vehicle 32 

Speed 82 

Using Motor Vehicle Without Authority 17 

All Others I8I 

i:S9 

HELD DT PROTECTIVE CUSTODY-ITO ARREST 3$k 

JUVENILE CASES HATOLED BY THE COURT 102 
JUVENILE CASES HAIOLED WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT 31 



OFFENSES REPORTED 
Assaults: Gun 

Knife 

Hands, Feet, etc. 
Other Assaults 



AUTO THEFTS 

Stolen in Wilmington-Recovered by Wilmington 
Stolen in Wilmington-Recovered Elsewhere 
Stolen Out of Town-Recovered by Wilmington 



1 
9 

29 

i 



3h 
h3 
88 
iS^ 



BREAKING & ENTERING 
Forcible Entry 
No Force 
Attempts 



LARCENY COMPLAINTS 
Pocket Picking 
Purse Snatching 
Shoplifting , 
From Motor Vehicles 
Auto Parts 
From Buildings 
From Coin Machines 
All Other 



BICYCLES 
Bicycles Stolen 
Bicycles Recovered 

MALICIOUS DAMAGE 

PROWLERS REPORTED 

ROBBERIES 
Armed Robberies 
Unarmed Robberies 

SEX OFFENSES REPORTED 
Rape by Force & Attempts 
Indecent Expos\ire 
Indecent Assault 
All Others 



MISCELLANEOUS 
Arson & Attempts 
Bomb Threats 
Disturbances 
Domestic Problems 
Emergencies 
Fires Dispatched to 
Juvenile Problems 
Lost & Found 

Missing Persons-Still Missing 
Missing Persons-Returned 



29h 
11 

363 



2 
h 
7 

107 
100 

28 
2 

391 



li+8 

608 
128 



3 
10 

3 
20 
3^ 



10 
9 

2,830 
2U2 
678 
300 
1,978 
75 
21 
10 



2h 



MISCELLAKEOUS (continued) 

Phone Calls: Suspicious, Otscene 



OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS 
Accidents Reported 
Accidents-Fatal 

Fireaims Identification Cards Issued 
Firearms- Li cense to Carry Handgun 
Ammunition Dealers Permits Issued 
Firearm Dealer Permits Issued 
Gunsmith Permits Issued 
Liquor Identification Cards Issued 
Summonses Delivered 
Suspensions & Revocations from 



581 



& Annoying 
Sudden Deaths 
Suicides 

Suicides, Attempted 



105 



2 



11 

h 

8 



502 
2lU 
h 

3 
3 
60 

255 
66 



Registry M/V 



DETECTIVE EUREATT ACTIVITY REPORT 



The Wilmington Police Department Detective Bureau is comprised of Dectective Sergeant George E. Shepard, 
Dectective Inspectors Joseph Cuoco, John Harvey and Daniel Ballou. Under the direction of Sergeant Shepard, 
the achievements for the period ending December 31 > 1975 saw the cases that had been continued from the past 
year all completed, and the new work for the year continued on a day-to-day basis throughout a very busy 
year. A continuing investigation into other crimes such as, armed robbery, larceny of all types, breaking 
& entering and assault & battery; plus many other type crimes kept the Detective Bureau very busy for the 
year 1975. 

Not every case becomes a court case, but we must treat all investigations with this possibility in mind, 
and, we have to review them well, prepare them and develop them as if they were to be presented in court. 
This takes many many hours of hard work in research and planning. We have worked on over two hundred cases 
involving private homes, public buildings, banks and industrial properties. (These are the local crimes.) 
(We also get involved with other departments in solving some of their crimes.) Some of these crimes have 
been solved and have been disposed of through court action, while some are still pending disposition, and 
others under review and investigation for further action. 

The "tools" of the Detective Bureau are: 

1. The Unmarked Cruiser. This vehicle has been driven over 25,000 miles in 1975. The vehicle 
is first used for patrol work by both the day detectives and also night detectives. It is 
used to take items of evidence to State Police Headquarters in Boston and also to the Pure 
Food and Drugs Center in Boston, "STAKE OUT" details, as well as many other uses we encounter 
in our work day. 

2. The Teletype Machine at the station that enables us to send out and receive messages of 
importance to our work and investigations. This machine is "tied in" with the Master Criminal 
Investigation Computer System and is most valuable in o\ir work. It services all New Elngland 
states. 

3. The Polaroid "Big Shot" Camera that is used to take "Mug Shots" of certain persons arrested 
by the department. This is a very important piece of equipment also. 

k. The Breathalyzer. An instrument (or machine) used to test operators of motor vehicles to 
see how much alcohol is in their system. We have three men who have been trained by the 
Massachusetts State Police and qualified as "Breathalyzer Operators". We have used this 
instrument fifty- foixr times during the year. If an operator does not pass this test, then 
he is a sure bet to be brought before the court. 

John Harvey has been trained by the Massachusetts State Police in "Fingerprints and Photography" aind has 
been "Qualified as an Expert" to give testimony as such. Joe Cuoco is the "Narcotics" man and is well 
qualified in his special work. His own report is contained on another sheet. Members of the Detective 
Bureau of Wilmington are "United with Detectives from Other Departments" and hold regular meetings where- 
by they exchange information and plans of mutiial interest. And most important of all, they are continuing 
their education in the field in which they are engaged. 



25 



VIOLATION OF DRUG LAWS 1975 



Arrest for Dispensing or Distribution: 



Class B Substajfice 
Class B Substance 
Class C Substance 
Class D Substance 



Barbiturates 
Amphetamines 
L.S.D. 
Marijuana 



Hypodermic Needle & Syringe 
Arrest for Possession of Controlled Substance: 



Class B Substance 
Class B Substance 
Class C Substance 
Class D Substance 
Class E Substance 



Amphetamine 
Barbiturates 
L.S.D. & P. CP. 

Marijuana 
Prescription Drugs 



1 
2 
1 
8 
2 



9 

10 

8 

35 



Sanrples Submitted to Department of Public Health Labroratory: 



Class B Substance 
Class B Substance 
Class C Substance 
Class D Substance 
Class E Substance 



Amphetamine 
Barbiturates 
L.S.D. & P. CP. 

Mari jxiana 
Prescription Drugs 



30 
25 
15 

30 

125 



May I once again remind all residents that the numbers to call are: WILMINGTON POLICE DEPAHTMENT 

FOR ALL EMERGENCY CALLS: 



FOR ALL OTHER CALLS: 



658-3331 
658-3332 

658-5071 
658-5072 



935-5966 (Wobum Line) 

And, we remind you that if you cannot dial any of these mambers just dial "operator" and tell her you wan- 
the Wilmington Police. 

I again remind you that we have cruisers on the road twenty-four hours a day. They are on constant patm 
all over town. Do not hesitate to call us. The cruiser may be right in your own nei^borhood and be the: 
in minutes. Put the call in. Let us be of service to you. 

Some of the "Changes" in 1975 are : 

Sergeant Maryajnn Langone, in charge of the Traffic Supervisors, was appointed to full time status on 
July II4. Patrolman Bobby Stewart was appointed a Sergeant on May I6. Patrolmaji Patrick Leonard was appoo 
ed a Sergeant on August I8. Patrolman Earl Bums, Jr. was appointed on November J. 

Items "Worthy of Note" in 1975 are : 

Patrolman George O'Connell and Patrolman Alfred Venuti completed their academy training on March lU, 1975 
and Patrolman Joseph Waterhouse and Patrolman Dennis Rooney completed their academy training on June 6, 1^ 

Furthering their education "Incentive Pay Program", are: Sergeants Mercier, Palmer and Stewart; and Patrc 
men Joe Cuoco, Bill Gable, John Harvey, Bob LaRivee, Arthur Lynch, Dave McCue, Bemie Nally, John Ritchie 
and Bob Spencer. All deserve to be complimented on their individual success and congi?atulated for their 
team spirit. 



26 



Ipatrolman Bemie Nally attended the F.B.I. Firearms Instructor's School at Camp Curtis Guild in Wakefield 
|in September and graduated with the qualified instructor's certificate. Safety Officer, John Ritchie has 
done a "bang up jot of things in 1975- 

WmK-O-MATIC Traffic Signals have been installed at all the school locations throughout Town. Wilmington 
I received a Radar Unit from the Governor's Highway Safety Bureau. We also received a new cruiser from the 
Governor's Highway Safety Bureau on Aiogust 7» equipped with flashing blue lights, radio, intercom, and 
speaker system. 

Highlights of 1975 were ; 

Jan\iary 7 - Holdup at North Wilmington Drugstore. January l8 - Holdup at Valley News. March 11 - N/e/M/l/e/C 
"VIP" Meeting at Lowell, and Selectmen Jim Miceli, Aldo Caira, George Boylen attended. (Chief's host) 
I May 3 - Retirement party for Sgt. Arthur Kelley, Patrolmen Charlie Bolan and Jim Marsi. A great time! 
August 3 - Plane crash on Lawrence Street. May 1 - Pistol team banquet and award night. Great time and 
Wilmington again did themselves proud! Patrolman Bill Gable is "Still in there Pitching" trying to get the 
Federal i^adio program into opeiation. Not only is he doing this bit for Wilmington but also twenty-one 
other communities. Patrolmen Tony Langone (and King) and Bobby Shelley (and Duke) have once again proved 
that "putting on the dog" is the only way to "make it big". Lowell Sun did a feature story on our K-9 Force. 
October 20 saw the completion of my 27th year as Chief of the Department. (l9U8 - 1975) 

Public Relations Programs ; 

Wilmington Police Association deserve to be thanked for their wonderful work in 1975 • 

Such things as the Summer Recreational Program at Silver Lake. This is a great thing. You cannot believe 
it by hearing some one telling you about it. You have to see it. You have to be there. Yes, I went this 
year. Please go in 1976. 

Wilmington Police Association sponsors the progi?am, but they know all about all of you who put that wonder- 
ful program over, and W.P.A. is indeed proud of each and every one for their contribution to a most worth- 
while cause. 

And again, thanks to W.P.A. and to Bob Auer at 125 Auction Hall for the Anntial Auction for the "Jimmy Fund". 

Speaking programs have been covered by Joe Cuoco (Drugs), John Ritchie (juvenile and Safety), Maryann 
Langone (Safety to Schools and School Children), John Harvey (Prints and Photography), Bemie Nally (Fire- 
arms to Boy Scouts), Tony Langone and Bobby Shelley (K-9 Dogs), Danny Ballou (Detective Work). We all get 
in the act! 

Once again, let me conclude this report by taking this opportunity to express my most sincere thanks and 
appreciation to all who have in anyway been of help or assistance to the Wilmington Police Department in 
1975. 

Special thanks go out to all Department Heads and their crews for the wonderful cooperation afforded us. 
To all members of the Police Department, to the Traffic Supervisors, and to the Clerks, to the Board of 
Selectmen, to the Town Manager and the Assistant Town Manager, and to all Town Committies and Town Organiza- 
tions, sincere thanks and appreciation for a great year 1975. 



Constable 



During the year I posted Notice of the Annuial Town Meeting Warrant, I have also posted other notices 
as well as performing other services for Town Officials and departments. 



27 



Fire Department 



The maxiual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, fotir Lieutenants, and twenty-five Privates. There^ 
is a call force of ten members. The department responded to a total of one thousand four hundred and 
forty-eight (l,M+8) calls. 



Residential Buildings 53 

Commercial Buildings ^ 

Vehicles 103 

Brush, grass and rubbish 392 



Out of Town Assistance 31 

False Alarms or Needless Calls 10$ 

Rescue and Emergency Ambulance 627 

Service Calls 132 



Estimated value of property endangered was 
Estimated property loss was 
Permits issued for storage of oil 
Permits issued for blasting 



$13,737,025 
$ 167,201 
95 
28 



As required by law, inspections were made of all schools, public buildings and all inflammable storage. 

The Fire Prevention Bureau, under the direction of Deputy Chief Wandell, made inspections of all busine8(( 
establishments in town. Local industries were assisted in the organization and training of fire brigades 
Fire prevention lectures were given in the schools. 

The Fire Alarm Division, under the direction of Private Blaisdell, made all necessary repairs to the fix«( 
alarm system and one hundred and thirty-six change-overs for the light and telephone companies were made«| 
Two miles of new wire were strung. Three new boxes were added to the system. Nximbers 3261, i4.28l, 5U7U. 
All alarm boxes were checked and tested during the year. 

Privates Edward Fuller, John Brown, and Keith Marshall completed an 8l-hour course of Practical Emergency 
Care at the Winchester Hospital. Deputy Cheif Wandell, Lieutenant Blonigen, Privates Corcoran and Meuse 
are attending fire related co\irses at the Community College. 




7,000 gal. Pumper for the Fire Department 



28 



Conservation Commission 



The busy schedule of your Conservation Commission this year included twenty- four regular meetings, seven 
Wetlands Protection Act hearings and nmerous meetings with other town officials. We have been in contact 
also with Conservation Commissions from neighboring towns when there have been problems of mutual interest. 
Your Commission is a member of and supports other conservation efforts, such as: Massachusetts Forests and 
Parks Association, Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions, Massachusetts Audubon Society, 
Hystic River Watershed Association, Conservation Law Foundation and others. These associations provide a 
wealth of information and educational opportxmities for our members. 

Annual Activities 

1. Student Government - Your Conservation Commission supports the student government 
program and sponsors an annual field trip for the participants. 

2. Camp Scholarships - As in past years, three young men were treated to two weeks of 
Conservation Camp at Spencer, Mass. We believe this is a valuable program and will 
continue to support it as long as there is an interest. 

3. Spring Planting - In conjunction with Arbor Day ceremonies, this year's planting and 
beautification program was held at the Shawsheen Elementary School. 

Our spring planting is perhaps our most energetic project. Many hours were spent on the layout and 
selection of evergreens and flowering shrubs to be planted. The program began with the planting of a 
mountain ash on Arbor Day and then continued the following Satiirday. Students, faculty, a member of the 
custodial staff and commission members worked together to clean up, plant and mulch the entire length of 
the school on Shawsheen Avenue. The project was completed several weeks later, with the same treatment on 
the Hopkins Street side of the building. A massive rhododendron was planted adjacent to the Hopkins Street 
entrance, that will provide beautiful color this year and in the years to come. 

Our thanks to eveiy one who participated in the planting, to the Highway Department for the delivery of 
several loads of bark moilch and the Groimds and Building Department for the use of garden tools. It is 
this type of cooperation that can make any program a success. 

The Commission was rewarded by over one hiondred letters of thanks and appreciation from the students of the 
Shawsheen School; all of which were read and greatly enjoyed. 

Inter-Board Activities 

The time spent working with other boards and town officials is very beneficial to your Commission. It gives 
us an opportunity to view projects while they are still in the planning stage, so we can assess the environ- 
mental impact before final plans are approved. 

Perhaps the project of greatest environmental impact to the Town, in the next several years, will be the 
re-location of Route 129. Your Commission had representatives at Phase I meetings held this past fall and 
will continue to participate as the project moves in to Phase II. 

Your Commission also attends Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Board of Appeals meetings when there 
are areas of mutual concern. 

Your Conseirvation Commission appreciates the contin\iing support and cooperation of the citizens of Wilmington, 
its Town officials, and employees in making oux programs a success. 



29 



Building Inspector 







1973 




197U 




1975 




No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


ITo. 


Valiiation 


Dwelling (single family) 


9h 


$2,U92,U00 


102 


$2,520,000 


72 


$1,957,000 


Residential Garages 


8 


26,600 


9 


31,350 


9 


UO,350 


Additions & Alterations 


89 


278,690 


90 


287,850 


129 


288.390 






$2,797,690 




$2,839,200 




$2,285,71+0 


Industrial Buildings 


7 


$1,66U,000 


3 


$1,135,000 


5 


$1,230,000 


Connnercial Buildings (stores) 







3 


U0,300 


2 


5,Uoo 


Add. & Alter, (non- residential) 


Ih 


1,525,800 


10 


759,i+00 


16 


2,108,U00 


Swinming Pools 


60 


130,500 


83 


1U3,870 


U2 


97,750 


Signs 


11 


6,700 


7 


1,950 


15 


17,575 


Utility Buildings 


3 


52,500 


3 


53,000 







Office Buildings 












1 


70,000 


Recreational Buildings 

















Sheds & Bams 


7 


25,875 


5 


2,800 


7 


ll;,260 






$3,405,375 




$2,136,320 




$3,51+3,385 






$6,203,065 




$lt,?75,?20 




$5,829,125 



Renewals 17 17 ih 

Demolitions 20 $ 70,350 l5 $ 119,900 23 $ 8i;,l|00 

Fire Damage & Repair 3 19,000 5 1+7,000 

Foundations 15 57,600 20 35,750 _Jk 71.500 

m $ 127,950 370 $ 17l+,650 "375* $ 202.900 



REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND TURNED OVER TO THE TREASURER; 



Building Permits 


3U5 


$15,858.00 


370 


$11,999.00 


375 


$13,l6i|.00 


Wiring Pennits 


375 


i+,270.00 


389 


1+,717.00 


362 


U, 01+7. 75 


Gas Pertnits 


105 


889.00 


176 


1,633.50 


121 


l,0l|3.00 


Plumbing Permits 


M 


1,213.00 


17? 


1,321.50 


150 


i,2U6.5o 




972 


$22,230.00 


1110 


$19,671.00 


1008 


$19,501.25 



* Actual 371+ - Permit #112 was revoked. 



30 



There are several items in my opinion interesting enough to include in this year's annual report. The 
highlights of which I shall try to simplify without losing the significant points. 

First: A financial analysis of the department can be summarized hy revealing that income from all permit 
fees collected nearly equals the total amount of department expenditures. ($19,501.2^ vs. $23,369.00) 

Second: Our work load this year has increased to such a degree that if it were not for the Federal CETA 
program and the employee assigned to assist me as a result of this program, our assigned task would have 
been hopeless. This increase in work load is the result of the passage of Chapter 802 of the Acts of 1972, 
which radically changed biailding codes State-wide, and shifted the responsibility for enforcement from the 
Department of Public Safety to the office of the local building official. These changes became effective 
January 1, 1975. 

The conclusion arrived at from the above is that it would be logical to use the monies collected in fees 

to provide the necessary staff to ensure adequate administration and enforcement requirements. Consequently, 

I have requested an increase in my budget for the coming fiscal year to reflect this vital need. 

Finally, my sincere gratitude to those of you who have given me your full cooperation throu^out this 
period. 



Carter Lecture Fund 



On April I7, 1975 » the Carter Committee presented Mr. Andre de la Varre, Jr., for a Bicentennial Grand Tour 
of New England, Mid-Atlantic States and the South - THE THIETEEU ORIGINAL STATES. Significant events were 
re-enacted at their original sites. The eloquent and often humorous words of men of a bygone era lived 
again through the narration of Mr. de la Varre. The program was well received by a veiy enthusiastic 
audience. 

Captain Irving Johnson, who is no stranger to Wilmington audiences, is coming to Wilmington on Wednesday, 
April 7, 1976 at 8:1^ p.m. in the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium. His program will be "GREAT SAILING 
ADVENTURES" - the end of the Great Age of Sail; an east- to-west Cape Horn voyage - the hard way. 

Loaded to her lines with 5300 tons of general cargo the "Peking" encounters vast storms off the dreaded 
Horn. A watertight camei?a and a trained acrobatic sailor made these unique films possible. At the request 
of the Honourable Company of Master Mariners, London, a copy of this film is preserved in the British 
Museum. Also documented is the life aboard this irmnense squarerigger from sail handling to sail making and 
fishing to Doldrums. 

A world voyage of the Brigantine "Yankee" crewed by jovng amateurs, four girls and sixteen men plus the 
Johnson family, this lovely brigantine sailed from Gloucester around the world. The film ranges from the 
romantic South Seas at their best to the weirdest happening of all Yankee's voyages, the Incredible Land 
Divers! Head first the natives plunge into the groxand with vines tied to their ankles. An uncharted river, 
the Sepik, is explored some 275 miles among the headhunters. Strange sailing craft, squalls, storms, and 
adventures galore spiced with Captain Johnson's own brand of humor complete the story. 

Internationally known as author, sailor, and lecturer, Irving Johnson has sailed the famous Brigantine 
Yankee seven times around the world and his new Ketch Yankee eighteen times across Ehirope. The Johnsons' 
many articles and CBS network specials for the National Geographic Society plus eight books have made them 
the world's most famous man and wife sailing adventure team. 



31 



Highway Department 



All the regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as patching streets, sweep- 
ing streets, cleaning catch "basins, erection of street signs, replacing guard rails, painting guard rails, 
scraping back roads, replacing broken curbing, etc. 

Chapter 8l Maintenance : 

The following streets were resurfaced all or in part: Coolidge Road, Dayton Road, Chapman Avenue, Sherida; 
Road, Hathaway Road, Truman Road, Pilling Road, Gunderson Road, Grant Street, Mackey Road, Wilson Street, 
Lincoln Street, Pershing Street, Liberty Street, Bancroft Street, Westdale Avenue, Brentwood Avenue, Maria 
Street, Roosevelt Road, Congress Street, Hillside Way, Kendall Street, Harden Street, Dorchester Street, 
Brand Avenue, Taplin Avenue, Phillips Avenue, Baker Street, Winchell Road, Bumap Street, Cottage Street, 
Veranda Avenue, Pairview Avenue, Railroad Avenue, Corey Avenue, Grand Street, Carolyn Road, State Street 
and Belmont Street. 

Sidewalk Program ; 

Sidewalks were constructed on the following streets: Hopkins Street from Shawsheen Avenue to Dorchester 
Street, Federal Street from Mackey Road to Wo bum Street, and Wo bum Street from Pedei^l Street to Kenwood 
Avenue. The sidewalks on these streets are about 80% completed. They will be completed in the spring. 

Hot Top Program : 

This money comes from the Highway Department expense accoimt. We hot topped the following streets: 
Ballardvale Street from Route 12$ to the Charles River Breeding Lab, Marcia Road-the upper end. Federal 
Street from Federal to Mackey Road and Glen Road from Middlesex Avenue to Lawrence Street. 

Drainage : 

The following drainage problems were eliminated this year. New drainage systems were installed on the 
following streets: Marcia Road, Federal Street and Glen Road, a new culvert on Andover Street, also new 
catch basins were constructed on Aldrich Road and Hamden Road. 

Betterment Streets : 

The Highway Department completed the construction on Lexington Street and Momingside Drive. 
Chapter 90 Construction : 

Hopkins Street was reconstructed this year with Chapter 90 funds. Hopkins Street is about 80% completed. 
This street will be finished in the spring. 

Snow and Ice Removal ; 

Snow and ice removal is a very expensive and major problem. The month of December was a very expensive 
month with a total of 23 inches of snow. 

Clean-up, Pick-up Caunpaign : 

The annual clean-up, pick-up campaign was conducted in April. We picked up approximately 80 loads of junk 
from homes dtiring the six days of the campaign. 

Roadside pick-up ; 

This program is sponsored by the Chamber of Conmierce and the students. I would like to thank every one 
who participated in the program. We picked up approximately 35 truck loads of rubbish and hauled it to th 
Town dump. 



32 



Brooks and Streams Maintenance ; 

As in the past years we used C.E.T.A. and N.Y.C. personnel, Federal- sponsored programs, for our stream and 
brook maintenance. 

Equipment ; 

The mechanics, foreman and I have checked over the equipment and sincerely conclude that we must replace 

1 dump track, 1 pickup truck, 1 street sweeper, a stone spreader and 1 sander body for snow and ice control. 

In concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Water and Cemetery Departments 
for their help during snow storms. The Police Department for keeping us informed during the winter months 
of snow conditions between the hoiirs of 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 a.m. weekdays, Sundays and holidays. To all the 
various departments for the cooperation extended this department dioring 1975. To the Town Manager and the 
Board of Selectmen for their support throughout the year. Last but not least, the men of the Highway 
Department who made 1975 a very productive year, my sincere thanks and appreciation. 



Tree Department 



The Tree Department carried on its routine work of trimming, cutting and removing trees. In April the 
annioal tree planting prog3?am took place. At this time 212 trees were set out, and mostly cared for by 
the people who requested them by submitting their names on the list at the Town Hall. Sixty-one diseased 
and dead roadside trees were removed. Posted trees were removed to allow for sidewalk and road constmc- 
tion on Hopkins Street, Federal Street and Wo bum Street. A number of trees were fed and cared for to 
insure proper growth. The insect control began in April. The vehicles of the Tree Department were used 
to plow snow for the Highway Department. Odd jobs were done when requested for the School Maintenance and 
Public Buildings Department. At Christmas time, we put up lights and decorations at the request of the 
Beautification Committee, and also set out a blue spruce tree at Deming Way which was decorated at Christ- 
mas time. 

Elm Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease 

Samples of elm trees believed to be diseased were sent to the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 
Porty-foTir diseased trees had to be taken down. The Tree Department stump cutter was used to remove 
numerous tree stumps. 

Moth Department 

The control of such insects as oak skeletonizers, Japanese beetle, pine saw flies, ticks and clinch bugs, 
etc. was maintained through continuous spraying, and the spraying of poison ivy. Trees were sprayed for 
Eastern tent caterpillars, and fall web worms. Seventy- two hornets nests were destroyed. 

Mosquito Control Program 

The fog generator, owned by the Tree Department is used for mosquito control. Between the hours of ei^t 
and twelve o'clock in the evening, fogging is carried on. We ask that the parents caution their children 
about the dangers involved in following the fogger. Larvaecide was put in all trapped water holes to 
siirpress the mosquito larva. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support, the Town departments 
for their cooperation and the men of the Tree Department for their cooperation and efforts during the year 
1975. 



33 



Town Engineer 



Evaluation of Work Load 

An examination of the work load for the Engineering Department reveals that we spent o-or time this year as 
follows: 30% Planning Board, Subdivisions; 25% Highway Department, Construction Projects; 1$% Water and 
Sewer Board, Construction Projects; 10% Town Wide and Future Projects; 10% Town Manager and Selectmen; 
10% All Others, We continue to revise our schediiling to provide service on a more balajnced and equitable 
basis. 

In-House Procedxires 

Consistent with the project started last year of cataloguing the resources available within the department 
we have inititated a program whereby we now receive automatically all plans recorded for all property with- 
in the Town. This allows us to have up-to-date information available to serve the town's citizens and oth( 
town departments, boards and commissions. Hopefully, next year this information will be transferred to th( 
Assessor's maps on a monthly basis rather thaji on the previous yearly basis. 

Projects for the Year 

This department routinely prepares several articles for Town Meeting. Streets that were accepted this yea: 
after having been inspected to assure compliance with Town standards were Ring Avenue, Biggar Avenue, and 
Sherburne Place. Streets that were relocated for future widening were Hopkins Street and Chestnut Street, 
Subdivision streets inspected during the year for future acceptance were in Glen Acres Estates, Juniper 
Ridge, Lucaya Estates, Elmwood Village, Presidential Heights, Cormier Park, North Wilmington Industrial Pa: 
and Jewel Industrial Park. 

In addition to the routine projects which the department performs, we try to complete one project of town- 
wide significance each year. This year, in cooperation with the Planning Board, the department prepared, 
printed and distributed a "Directory aind Precinct Map" from which it is possible to determine the location 
of every house in town. This is a useful map, and it is on sale in sevei^al town departments. 

Conclusion 

Last year, as a resTilt of evaluation of work load, we decided that the department cotild better serve the 
Town if our time were better distributed over several projects rather than merely serving the few upon 
which we had a heavy concentration. We have made significant progress in this direction and will continue 
to concentrate on this improvement. 




Federal Street sidewalk construction 
3I1 



Public Buildings Department 



1975 saw an easing of the energy problem. Fuel prices remain hi^ but the supply was not impaired. The 
prices of materials and supplies increased in 1975 » but the increases were considerably less than in 197^4- 

Considerable emphasis was placed on improving the atheletic fields this year. Baseball and Softball fields 
were improved at the West Intermediate, Shawsheen, North Intermediate, Wobum Street and the High School. 
A new soccer field was established at the Shawsheen Street School. 

Tennis courts at the Wobum Street, Wildwood Street and Glen Road School were coated with a red and green 
color system. Red for the out-of-bounds area and green for the playing surface. 

Major projects during 1975 were: 

New gutters and exterior painting at the Hamden Tavern. 

Renovation of the main desk area at the Police Station. 

New counters and improvement on the main floor at the Town Hall. 

Renovations in the Hi^ School Shop area. 

Electrical work in the Hi^ School home economics department. 

Emergency deluge showers were installed in the science rooms at the High School, 
North Intermediate and West Intermediate Schools. 

Repair fire damage at the Mildred Rogers School. 

Roof work was accomplished at the North Intermediate, Boutwell Street and Wildwood Street Schools. 

The addition of Comprehensive Employaoent and Training Act "C.E.T.A," personnel enabled the department to 
provide better service ajid accomplish projects that cotild not have been done without these additional 
personnel. It is anticipated that the C,E,T.A. program will end sometime in 1976. 

My compliments to the personnel of the Public Buildings and Groionds Department for a job well done, and my 
appreciation to those departments that provided assistance to us during 1975. 




Conservation Commission hearing 



35 



Housing Authority 



ORGMIZATION 

The Wilniington Housing Authority is authorized by Section 3 of Chapter 121 B of the General Laws, as 
amended . 



MEMBERS 



Mr. George W. Hooper, Chairaiaji 
Mr. Leo Woodside, Vice-Chairman 
Miss Lulu Sanborn, Treastirer 
Mrs. Barbara Larson, Asst. Treasurer 
Mr. Donald Garland 

Mr. Henry E. Borrazzo, Executive Director 



STATUTORY REFERENCE 

1. Housing Authority Law: Section 26l of the General Laws, as amended. 

2. Act of providing Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of 19$U> as 
amended. 

BALAtTCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1975 - 66?- 1 
ASSETS LIABILITIES 



Administration Funds $ i;9,379.13 

Savings Account 6,3l6.U3 

Tenants Accounts (II3.OO) 
Development Costs $575 » 000 

Liquidated 113,000 li62,C)00.00 

Total $517,582.56 



Eniployees Payroll Deductions 
Matured Interest & Principal 
Reserves 

Debt Service Reserve 
Operating Reserve 
Notes Issued $575,000 
Less Notes Retired 113,000 

Total Liabilities 
Residual Receipts (Deficits) 

Total Liabilities 

& Deficit 



$ 323.96 
771.91 
36,31+8.09 
26,600.00 
12,559.36 

U62,000.00 

$538,603.32 

(21,020.7^ ) 

$517.582.56 



BALAtTCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1975 - 705-1 
ASSETS LIABILITIES 



Development Fund 
Development Cost 
Total 



$199,1+67.31+ 
I g2>l65.99 
$351.633.33 



Accrued Interest 
Notes Authorized 
Total 



$ 1,633.33 
350.000.00 
$351.633.33 



During 1975, the Wilmington Housing Authority exerted its efforts to conduct a major maintenance program 
throughout the authority under the direction of its Chairman, Mr. George W. Hooper, and its Executive 
Director, Mr. Henry E. Borrazzo. Funds were solicited from the Department of Commvmity Affairs for this 



36 



undertaking. The Vilmington Housing Authority received $128,000.00 for this modernization program. Throu^ 
the efforts and support of other authority members, Barbara Larson, Leo Woodside, Lulu Sanborn, and Donald 
Garland, the modernization program became a reality. 

Utilizing manpower from the CETA program and WIN program, all plumbing and electrical facilities are being 
replaced or repaired. A poor septic system condition that had existed for 16 years is in the process of 
being modernized. Under the chainnanship of George W. Hooper, and co-chaired by Barbara Larson, Leo 
Woodside, and Lulu Sanborn, social activities for the elderly were also instituted during 1975 > thus making 
the Deming Way Housing facility an extremely desirable place to live for our senior citizens. 

It is unfortunate, indeed, that a halt has taken place in obtaining additional housing due to the current 
financial condition of the Commonwealth. However, we are doing o\ir utmost, searching and seeking new 
avenues that may be available for various types of funded housing that would properly lend itself and be 
compatible to Wilmington. 

During 1976 » we will once again perform an undertaking in the area of modernizing and rehabilitating the 
underground heating and plumbing facilities throtighout the authority. In addition, a major undertaking 
will be made by the authority under the direction of the Chairman, George W. Hooper, and the Executive 
Director, Henry E. Borrazzo, to seek an additional 2^0 units of housing for the elderly as well as the 
institution of 27 units under Section 8. A drive for the support of all the residents of Wilmington will 
be undertak:en in the early part of 1976 for housing for the elderly as well as the handicapped. This drive 
will be spearheaded by committee members Barbara Larson and Leo Woodside and sanctioned by Authority Chair- 
man, George W. Hooper and Member Lulu Sanborn. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is totally funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and is not dependent 
upon the real estate taxes of the Town of Wilmington. 



Permanent Building Committee 



In compliance with the regulations of the School Building Assistance Board, the Permanent Building 
Committee hired the firm of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates on January 6, 1975 to do an Environmental 
Impact Report on the Salem Street site for the proposed new High School. This was completed on 
January 20, 1975 aJ^d sent to the SBAB. 

At the Special Town Meeting of June 23, 1975 » the Permanent Building Committee was commissioned by the 
Town Meeting to prepare preliminary plans and cost estimates for three different btiilding or modifica- 
tion programs. In keeping with this, the Permanent Building Coimnittee retained an architect to complete 
these prog3?ams. Mid-point towards completion of these programs, the School Committee declared a moratorium 
on any additional school building for at least one year. 

With approval from Mr. Sterling Morris, the Permanent Building Committee continued to completion of the 
commissioned program. 

We are sorry to have lost two of our members during the coiirse of the year, Mr. Arthur Pizzuti and 
Mrs. Patricia White both resigned due to moving out of the Town of Wilmington, Two new members were 
appointed, Mr. Albert Blackburn and Mr, Edward Thompson, 



37 



I 



Board of Health 

i 



During 197$ there were several personnel changes. Dr. Luisito Francisco was hired as puhlic health 
physician to replace Dr. Gerald Pagan who passed away. Mrs. Edwina Howard was employed as dental hygienis 
to fill the vacancy left by the retirement of Eleanor Hovey. Dr. R. S. Homung will act as honorary con- 
STiltant to the Board on matters of dental health. Mrs. Marion Boylen was elected chairperson of the Board 
of Health. 

. A Hypertension Clinic was put into effect on a monthly basis in 1975 • 

. A Town-wide Flu Clinic was conducted with the aid of the Women's Club, at no cost to the town, 
. The dental program, which lapsed for a period of a year, was reinstated. 
. The services of a physiotherapist were retained for selective needs. 

. Health counseling for Senior Citizens at the Drop- in-Center was discontinued since the Council for 
the Aging engaged their own n\irse. 

. The Board signed a three-year garbage contract with a new contractor with a substantial saving over I: 
the previous contract. 

. The dump situation wajs referred to the Attorney General for resolution by the State Health Departmen 
. The Board upgraded thjeir stable regulations and amended their sewerage regulations. j| 
. The Board approved yearly contracts for the Family Counseling Service and for the Share Program. 
. The Board along with other agencies participated in a Health Fair at the High School. ^ 



. The Board participated in Hospital Day at the New Elngland Memorial Hospital by sponsoring a lead 
paint program. 

. A diabetes testing device was purchased for community-wide programs and for routine testing. 

. Plans late in the year were made for a lead- testing program. 

. The Board met with the Lions Club to plan a glaucoma program in the spring. 



. A complaint was lodged against the Board of Health through the State Commission on Discrimination in 
regards to the awarding of the garbage contract. 

. The Board spent a great deal of time in dealing with air pollution complaints directed toward certai) 
local industries. 

. The Board met with State and local officials together with contractors to try and resolve the solid 
waste problem in the town. 

. The Board, in response to homeowner requests, tested private homes for the presence of lead paint. 



38 



i 



A. COMMDNICABLE DISEASE 

1. Monthly Immunization Clinic 

2. Anti Rabies Clinic 

3. Tuberciilosis report 



Flu Vaccine 



Hospital Day 



Attendance 206 

Dogs immunized 71? 

New cases reported 1 

Reactivated case 1 

Deaths reported 1 

Hospitalized at MCS 1 

Home visits 1|5 

Office visits 16? 
No. of school personnel tested at 

special classes 139 

No. of seniors tested at special classes 85 

No. of children tested at Headstart ij.2 

Four clinics held-doses given 6^0 

No. of children tested 58 



The Board together with Community Team Work of Lowell, Inc. conducted a lead testing program 
at the New England Memorial Hospital. 



6. Health Counseling Senior Citizens 



No. of sessions held 
Attendance 



25 



7. Hypertension Screening Clinic Attendance 67 

This program is held on the 3^<i Tuesday of each month from 300 to UOO a^^d from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. 



8. Physiotherapy 



No. of patients seen 
No. of home visits 
Cost to Town 



9. Booster Tetanus/Diphtheria Clinic for Seniors 

At tendance 

10 . Tmmunization Clinics (Special ) Attendance 

These were for kindergarten and elementary classes held at Villanova Hall. 
B. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 



1. Premature Births 

2. Nursing Visits 

3. Newborn Infants 



Home visits 
Cases reported 



Fees collected 
Home visits 



Immunizations schedule and record book sent to 209 mothers. 
k' General Health Supervision Home visits 



5. Communicable Diseases 



Cases reported 
Home visits 
Office visits 



5 
15 
$30. 



82 
167 



6 

8 

1U96 
$370. 

30 



590 
58 

10 

63 



39 



C. DENTAL HEALTH 



1. Children Serviced 



The dental program resumed on a full time basis in December of 1975- The new dental center is no\ 
located at the Shawsheen School. Mrs. Edwina Howard was hired as the dental hygienist. 



D. ENVIROMENTAL HEALTH 



1. Licenses & Permits Sewerage ll;l 



Food 71 

Milk f store) J46 

Milk (vehicle) I6 

Recreation Camps 2 

Piggeries 2 

Funeral Directors 2 

Refuse Transportation 30 

Installers 35 

Stable 25 

Fees collected $2063 

2. Sewage Disposal Inspections & Investigations I+7I 



The Board amended their sewerage regulations to reqiiire water table determinations be done in the 
spring of the year. 



3. Milk Sanitation Milk Analysis 11 

Because of the limited State funds, the Essex Agriculttiral School is no longer analyzing milk 
samples outside of Essex Coimty. 



1|. International Certificates Certified 23 

$. Garbage Contract 

The Board signed a three-year contract effective July 1, 1975 for the sum of $35>000 per year and 
Mr. John Cotoni was awarded the contract. A savings of $51,890 was made over a three-year period 
with this new cont3?act. 



6. Dump Contract 

The dump contract continued on a month to month basis d\iring 1975* The Board met with various 
local and State agencies in an attempt to resolve the dmp problem. In December the State Health 
Department referred this matter to the Attorney General's office. 



7. Complaints 323 

8. Inspector of Animals Animals quarantined 59 

Animals released from quarantine 59 

Animals disposed of 276 

Premises inspected for domestic animals kh 

9. Food Establishments Inspections 60 



Two cases of Salmonella were reported. Both persons had eaten at the same restaurant prior to 
their illness. All employees of this restaurant had stool specimen examinations. Approximately 
300 lbs. of food from a frozen food chest in a food facility was removed following a citizen 
complaint. One soup specimen was submitted to the State laboratory along with two other food 
substances. 



ho 



10. 



Air Pollution 



A great deal of time and effort was made by the Board trying to resolve air pollution complaints. 
Many meetings were held with State officials and industrial owners and managers. 



11. Recreation Sanitation 

12. Stream Pollution 

13. Drinking Water 
II+. Subdivisions 



Swimming water samples collected 
Samples collected 
Samples collected 



The Board became involved in three subdivisions during the course of the year. Field tests were 
conducted to determine the suitability of soil for subsurface disposal of sewage. 



15. Court 



Pour appearances were made at the Vobum District Court. Attorney Simon Cutter represented the 
Board. 



16. Share 



During the calendar year 197$ » the Town expended $11,700 toward the Share Program. For each dollar 
contributed, Wilmington citizens receive $1.20 in services. 



17. Family Counseling 



Scheduled Appointments 
Total Cost 
Clients' Fees 
Cost to Town 



98U 
$21,567 
$ 5,717 
$15,8U9 



The Board wishes to thank all those who assisted in the various health programs held during the year. 




Easter egg hunt at the Town Park 



Volunteers for roadside clean up 



41 



Recreation Department 



AlthoTigh Recreation is as old as civilization itself, its inclusion as a primary municipal service is a 
relatively new and complex phenomenon. Society's chan^ from "work ethic" oriented to the cirrrent and 
futtiristic leisure-oriented type has forced a reassesment of municipal functions. Recreation as a human 
service component is afforded a role of increasing importance within the changing framework of government 
delivery systems. The impact that increased leisure time is having on all of us presents a formidable 
challenge to the recreation profession as it attempts to meet current and future leisure needs of the 
populace. The following objectives of the Recreation Department serve as a guide in our efforts: 

OBJECTIVES 

To provide opportunities for self expression 
To develop a sense of personal worth 

To provide activities that allow for personal achievement and accomplishment 
To provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

To provide physical activities which are new and different, offering a certain amount of challenge 
to participants 

To teach skills in various activities that will have carry-over value in later life 

To provide a healthful and diversified program of recreation activities in an attenrpt to meet the 
needs and interests of the people being served 

The Recreation Department in its fifth year with a full time director presents the following 
breakdown on 1975 programs and services: 

YOUTH PROGRAMS 

Suimner Playgrounds ; The summer playground program again proved to be popular with the 6 to 12 year old 
youth in Wilmington. The program which is run on a Monday throu^ Friday basis from 9^00 a.m. to 35 30 
p.m. began June 25 and ended on August l5. Each of the seven different playground locations were staffedl 
by two leaders, an aide plus a Neighborhood Youth Corps person. Each playground planned and conducted a i 
healthful and exciting schedule of recreation activities including but not limited to drama, tennis, fiel^ 
trips, special events, family night cook-outs, sports and games, inter-playground competition, bicentermi^ 
activities, tournaments plus beach and pool days. Arts and crafts projects were as popizlar as ever throng 
the efforts of the arts and crafts instructor. Town-wide special events included the two day Summer 
Olyoopics held at the hi^ school and sponsored by the Knights of Columbus, Soap Box Derby held next to 
Buzzell and Swain Schools and sponsored by the Police Association, Beach Day and Swim Meet held at Silverj 
Lake and also sponsored by the Police Association plus the Croquet Open held on the Common and trip to th^ 
North Shore Music Theatre. 

Special Needs Program : The Recreation Department provides a unique and very successful recreation programl 
for the handicapped youth in town. The winter program was conducted out of the North Intermediate School! 
on Saturdays from Januaiy to April. This past summer saw a change in location as that part of the progial 
was moved from the Swain School where it had been conducted the five previous years to Camp kO Acres in 
North Wilmington. The natural setting with all its wildlife and outdoor educational opportunities suppli' 



k2 



the participants and staff with a different atmosphere and setting; just what was needed. The program 
was staffed by thirteen persons plus Neighborhood Youth Corps personnel and many volunteers offering 
valTiahle service. The group met five days a week from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Transportation for the 
over 50 registered campers was made possible through the donated use of two station wagons by Fred F. Cain. 
Activities at the camp included field trips, pool days, active and quiet games, nature lore, family night 
cookouts, singing, arts and crafts, drama, physically corrective activities held in the Wobum Street 
School gym, overnight camping plus special events including participation in the Olympics and Beach Day. 
The highlight of the summer was the First Anniial Special Olympics for nearby towns which had similar 
summer programs for handicapped youth. Wilmington's staff planned and conducted the event held at the 
Elks Club in Tewksbury. This entire program is ^09^ reimburseable from the State Department of Education. 

Teen Center ; The Recreation Department sponsored a summer teen center program in the Walker School next 
to the Police Station. Over 600 local teenagers registered at the center. The schedule was divided into 
two sections with those teens having just completed the 7th and 8th grade utilizing the center from 9^00 
a.m. to 12:00 noon on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, while the high school students used the facility on 
Monday and Thursday evenings from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Tuesdays. 
This new program was staffed with 2 supervisors, a NYC aide and a CETA employee working on a full-time 
basis within the Recreation Department. The center was a meeting place, centrally located, and ideal for 
a small program of this nature. The downstairs basement served as a lounge while the two upstairs class- 
rooms served as games and activities rooms. Special events conducted were trips to see the Red Sox, Bolts, 
Wingaersheek Beach, "Jaws", Canobie Lake, Bowling and Minature Golf, Gloucester, Harold Parker State Forest, 
and Mt. Chocorua. 

Baseball ; Boys ages l5 to 18 are eligible to play on the summer team which conrpetes against surrounding 
towns in the Northeast Baseball League. The team plays its games at the high school and is coached and 
managed by volunteers. 

Softball ; The intra-town league for girls ages 13 and l6 played its games on Tuesdays, Fridays and 
Saturdays at the Town Park during June, July and Aiigust. The league entered a team in the Merrimack 
Valley Tourney and emerged as champions. The traveling team compiled an 8-l| mark in league play. A team 
of girls ages 17 and over competed against teams from s\irrounding towns in an informal nature. 

The boys' league consisted of 9 teams with players being between 13 and 17 years' old. The one pitch 
league conrprised of over 1^0 teenage boys played a l6-game schedule. Coaches and managers for all the 
Softball teams volxinteer many hours and much effort to the success of this program. 

Town Beach ; The Recreation Department staffs the two beaches at Silver Lake with qualified lifeguards. 
The beaches are a tremendous recreational asset to all of the townspeople especially during the summer 
months. Swimming lessons were offered free of charge. Beginner, intermediate and advanced lessons were 
available for those ages 6 to 12 while advanced lifesaving was offe2?ed to those ages l6 and over. The 
swimming lessons' program is one of the more sought after programs offered by the department. 

Basketball ; The Wilmington Recreation Basketball League in its 12th season registered over ^00 people 
in its youth and adult divisions. Games were played in the High School gymnasiiom on Wednesdays, Thurs- 
days, Saturdays and Simdays. Many persons served as volunteer coaches for the 39 youth teams in the 
league . 

Practice time was alloted for girls' teams in the league on Tuesday evenings in the Wobum Street School 
gym. Practices for boys' teams were held on Thursday evenings in the West Intermediate School. 

The 5th Annual Invitational Basketball Totimament was conducted in April following the conclusion of the 
regular season. Following this popular toximament, trophies and plaques were distributed to coaches and 
certain players. 

Girls' Ice Hockey ; The ice hockey team comprised of girls ages 10 and over competed for the second year 
in the Merrimack Valley Girls' Ice Hockey League. Practices were held on Tuesday afternoons in Billerica, 
and league games were played on Saturdays in Nashua, New Hampshire. 



U3 



Soccer ; Each spring the department fields two soccer teams who play in the Boston Area Youth Soccer 
League. The older boys' team with those imder I9 years of age and the younger boys' team made up of 
hoys ages li+ and under played a competitive schedule against other Eastern Massachusetts towns with 
games being played at the North Intermediate School Field. 

Flag Football ; The boys' flag football league with its k teams of boys ages 9 to 12 played an intraunura; 
schedule of games on Monday evenings from September to November at the Town Park. 

Elementary Open Gym ; This winter the gym program was run out of the Shawsheen, Wobum and Wildwood 
School gyms on Saturday mornings from 9:00 a.m. to 12;00 noon. A variety of indoor sports and games 
were available to youth in grades 1 throiogh 6. The program ran from December throu^ March. 

Intermediate Open Gym ; Both the North and West Intermediate School gyms were utilized by the intermedia' 
school students. The program was mm from December through March on Saturday afternoons from 1;00 p.m. 
to UsOO p.m. Active sports and games such as basketball, volleyball, gym hockey and others hi^lighted 
the program. 

Teen Open Gym : D\xring February, March and April the High School gum was a center of activity, as on 
Monday evenings, the teens utilized the gym for recreation activities of their choice. The response 
was so good that additional time was given to the program. Gymnastics, basketball and gym hockey proved 
to be popular activities. 

Bowling ; This most popular program for youth in grades k through 12 ran after school every week day froE 
October thro\igh April 11. Over 500 bowlers participated in the program. Each person bowled once a week 
at Pleasure Lanes in North Reading. Bowlers received transportation from their respective schools to th« 
lanes, and back to the vicinity of each person's home, use of shoes etc. at the lanes, personal bowling 
shirt, a chance to win one of many trophies, supervision and instruction all for $1.75 per session. In 
addition a Halloween Party and Thanksgiving "Turkey Shoot" were sponsored by the lanes for all the bowlen 
and parents. Nearly i|00 bowlers took advantage of the free field trip to Canobie Lake cu lm inating the 
bowling program on May 3« Tickets and transportation were provided free of charge by the lanes. 

Arts and Crafts ; During April and May the Mildred Rogers School hosted 5 arts and crafts classes of 
youngsters in g3?ades 1 to 3« The classes were held on Saturday mornings. The yoxmg people showed great 
ingenuity and creativity as they produced many decorative and useful projects. 

Santa's Workshop ; Santa Glaus and all his busy elves welcomed hundreds of young people and parents as 
Santa's Uth Annual Workshop opened to the public. The Workshop resembling the true one at the North Pole 
consisted of elves working on toys, a multiplicity of decorations with Christmas music in the air. Youn^ 
visitors could sit on Santa's lap and receive a candy cane, helium filled balloon and a color snapshot 
with Santa. This Workshop seems to be a imiquely popular activity for yo\ang and old alike. ^| 

Others ; The Recreation Department either sponsored or helped in planning and conducting the following 
activities for Wilmington's youth; vacation programs, ski trips, Celtics trip, Easter egg hunt. Horrible 
parade. Student Government Day, Memorial marathon, dances, chess club, spring playgrounds, Jr. Winter 
carnival. Bicentennial fair, free public skating. 

ADULT PROGRAMS 'I 

Men's Open Gym ; Local men ages I8 and over were able to compete informally or just practice basketball 
in the West Intermediate Gym. The program ran on Thursday evenings from 8:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. and was 
a popular one with the men. It lasted from November through March. 

Basketball : Men compete ann\ially in the Recreation Basketball League. Each year competition grows 
keener in this division of the league. Games are played in the High School gym. 

Ladies Open Gym ; Ladies ages I8 and over could compete in basketball infomally on Tuesday evenings 
from 8:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in the Wobum Street School gym. The program ran from October through March. 

Co-ed Volleyball ; Both men and woman had the opportimity to engage in this popular recreation activity. 
They competed against each other on mixed teams playing informally. This program was operated out of 
the Noirth Intermediate School gym on Wednesday evenings, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. from October through Mara 



kk 



Ladies Slimnastics ; Ladies ages l8 and over were eligible for this invigorating activity. Over 100 
women did participate in the program which was held on Wednesday evening in the Shawsheen School gym. 
The ladies exercised to music, danced, performed on the gymnastics apparatus and participated in active 
games. The program ran from October to December 17 . 

Ballroom Dancing : This has proved to be our most popular adult activity. Over ^00 Wilmington couples 
have taken this class. Beginner, intermediate and advanced levels are offered each session. During 197$ 
there were h sessions with approximately 300 couples involved. The classes taught by a professional 
instructor are held on Monday evenings in the North Intermediate School cafeteria. 

Ladies Bowling ; In October, a ladies bowling program was begun at Pleasure Lanes in North Reading. 
Ladies received k free leam-to-bowl sessions and then joined a Friday morning league. 

Softball ; The Men's Softball League played its games during the summer nights at the Town Park. Many 
residents participate in this very popular sport. Volunteers continually assxire the success of this 
well-developed soft ball league. 

Others ; Additional programs where the department is involved are: Memorial Marathon, men's ice hockey, 
men's flag football, use of Town Beach and Park plus field trips. 

COMMUNITY YOUTH 

Several youth organizations in town receive partial financial support through the Recreation Department 
budget. These excellent programs are run by interested volunteers who devote their time to helping our 
younger people receive enjoyment through recereation activity. These organizations are Youth Hockey, 
Figure Skating Club, Pop Warner, Senior Little League and Pony League. 

Providing a well-diversified program of leisure recreation offerings is a town-wide function. Much support 
is necessary for the fulfillment of our programs. The Recreation Commission and Director thank those public 
and private citizens plus the many civic and fraternal organizations for their generous support in helping 
to provide a well-rounded program of recreation activities for the Town. 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



This is a list of all weighing and measuring devices, scales, 
sealed, and condemned during the year 1975 • 


pumps, meters. 


weights that were 


tested. 




Adjusted 


Sealed 


Not Sealed 


Condemned 


Balances, Scales and Weights 


71 


l6h 


17 


31 


Capacity Measures 


22 


h9 


20 


22 


Liquid Measuring Meters 


65 


187 


9 


33 


Other Measuring Devices 


27 


3h 


18 


17 


Prepackaged Foods Rewei^ed 


3,225 









U5 



WILMINGTON WATER DEPARTMENT 
SUPPLY VS. USE 




I ' I ' I ' ' I ' I ' ' I I I I I I ' I ■ I I ' I 
1950 1955 I960 1965 1970 1975 

YEAR 

The graph above portrays the relationship between the available capacity of the wellfields to supply water 
and the maximum demand for the use of water. The shaded line, which rises and falls in a series of steps, 
illustrates the addition of each pumping station over the years, and the loss of capacity due to taking 
stations out of service because of high iron and manganese content. The heavy line illustrates the mari mum 
amount pumped in a 2i4.-hour period during the year. Although these peaks always occ\ir in the warm weather 
months and during hot dry periods, it is necessary to provide eqiiipment, pipe line capacity and storage 
facilities to supply water during the peak demands which is not needed for normal use. Whenever the heavy 
line is above the shaded line, the demand exceeds the supply and with all stations running, the additional 
water can only come from storage. If either equipment or storage is lacking, restrictions must be imposed 
or water and pressure for fire protection will not be available. 

It should be noted that for the last three years the capacity barely exceeds the demand even with partial 
restrictions, and there is no reserve capacity for equipment failure or maintenance. It is likely that in 
the event of hot, dry periods similar to the summer of 1975 » that all use of water for outside use will be 
prohibited. 

U6 ! 



PUMPING STATISTICS 



WATER SUPPLY 

Maximum Gallons 
Per Day 

Maximum Gallons 
Per Week 

Maximiffli Gallons 
Per Month 

Average Gallons 
Per Day- 
Average Gallons 
Per Month 

Total Gallons 
Per Year 



J+, 61+7, 000 



1222 
3,796,000 



i+, 370,000 



122k 

U, 120,000 



1975 
U,36i+,000 



26,297,000 21,765,000 23,202,000 
91;, 268, 000 89,097,000 91,141+8,000 
2,530,000 2,1+81+, 000 



23,961,000 26,61+1,000 
97,l|Ol+,000 105,599,000 



2,557,000 



2,61+7,000 



2,62l+,000 

76,973,000 75,569,000 79,838,000 77,790,000 80,508,000 

923,678,000 906,833,000 958,051,000 933,U78,000 966,090,000 

50.97" 



Annual Rainfall 


3U.99" 


50.1+2" 


1+6. 26" 


37. 90" 




CONSUMPTION 


STATISTICS - GALLONS 






1972 


1973 


i?7J+ 


1975 


Residential Use 

" % of Total 


212,707,178 

33°/o 


26i+,911+,632 


27l+,851+,097 
38% 


291,710,010 
h2% 


Industrial Use 

" % of Total 


(1+36,1+97,322) 

660/0 


1+06,1+1+9,978 
58.1+% 


1+17,011,892 

h&/o 


369,269,678 
53.2% 


Commercial Use 

" % of Total 


(incl. with Ind.) 


23,928,612 
3.h% 


27,1+55,530 
3% 


82,530,1+69 
i+.8o/o 


Total Water Metered 


61+9,201+, 500 


695,293,222 


719,321,519 


693,510,157 


* % of Water Pumped 


72% 


10.2% 


11% 


72% 



* The difference "between the water pumped and the water metered, 
273,000,000 gallons in 1975, represents water used for flushing 
mains, for fires and other hydrant uses, and water lost due to 
leakage throiJ^out the system. 

Augmentation of the water supply continued to "be of the utmost importance. An engineering investigation 
of the availability of water from the Town of Burlington resulted in the conclusion that, if any, only a 
very limited amount mi^t he available on an emergency basis. 

The Ipswich River Watershed District continues to function, but it will be many years before any water will 
be available for Wilmington. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts through its Department of Environmental Quality Engineering, after a long 
delay and a reqiiirement to excavate and remove a small consolidated waste oil dump, would not approve the 
test well site in the Salem Street well area due to the presence of manganese and "evidence of significant 
amounts of organics and hydrocarbons". Consequently, this promising source of additional water was abandoned. 



i;7 



Additional drilling is now being done in the vicinity of the Brown's Crossing Wellfield auid will continue 
in other areas. 



An engineering report, dated March 1973» on a test of a well near the Cranberry Bog off Shawsheen Avenue, 
recommended this source be developed subject to approval by the State Department of Public Health. On 
January 29, 1975 > almost 2 years later a conditional approval was given. Land acquisition plans have been 
prepared. Because of the possibility that the water from this source will require a treatment plant, and 
public hearings and State approval of the land taking is necessary, action by the Commissioners was delayed 
pending test results and approval of the source off Salem Street. With the disapproval of the Salem Street 
soiirce, the Commissioners intend to proceed with the taking near the cranberry bog, with Town Meeting 
approval . 

Subject to payment of taxes, a gift of 25 acres of land adjacent to the Salem Street well field was offered 
by Robert Corey. The Commi ssioners accepted this land because it helps protect the water supply from 
encroachment . 

A study of the pumping and consumption statistics reveals that in spite of a 3«6% drop in consumption from 
197Ui there was an increase of 3.U% in the total amount pumped, the second highest amount pumped in the 
history of the department! The increase is due to the amount of water required for main flushing to keep 
the q\iality of the water within tolerable limits. It is interesting to note that residential consumption 
increased l^/o during 1975 » while industrial plus commercial consumption decreased y/o. 

In spite of a request for alternate day sprinkling of lawns, and around-the-clock pumping, there were 
several times during summer dry spells when standpipe levels were far too low. Only the timely arrival of 
rain prevented a complete ban of all outside use of water. 

WATER QUALITY 

A considerable sacrifice in water quantity is being made to keep the quality within useable limits. In 
addition to the flushing program previously mentioned, two stations. Butters Row and Aldrich Road, remain 
shut down. The amount of iron and manganese in the operating sources exceeds recommended limits at times, 
and further increase would require more flushing and less available water, and eventually a complete shut 
down or treatment. 

Dead-ends continue to be a source of complaint because settled-out material tends to drift to the end of 
the pipe where it collects. Also during summer months the water is warmer and becomes stagnant, which may 
result in taste and odor complaints. In the past dead-ends were either flushed or continuously running 
bleeders were installed, both methods wasting large quantities of water. The limited supply and inflated 
pumping costs now require other more expensive measures, so the department has been installing extensions 
and ties where physically possible. The installation of facilities at the wells to treat the water at the 
source would alleviate the poor quality and provide a needed additional supply. 

WATER DISTRIEUTIOIT SYSTEM 

The Andover Street portion of the North Wilmington System Improvement Program voted in the March 197U 
Town Meeting was installed, resulting in a substantial pressuire increase in that area. However, the March 
1975 Town Meeting did not approve the taking of one of the easements necessary to construct the most 
important portion of the project along Ballardvale Street. This delay in a necessary improvement will be a 
costly one. 

The department installed a 12" tie between dead-ends in Canal Street which will serve as part of a planned 
connection between the Hillside Way and Nassau Avenue standpipes. The tie also improves water qioality in 
the immediate area. Work is underway in the preparation of easements for dead-end extensions in Muse 
Avenue connecting to other mains. A contract was let and work is underway on a connection under the rail- 
road tracks between Lake Street and Grove Avenue. This will improve the flow in the Silver Lake and Shaw- 
sheen Avenue areas and eliminate two dead-ends. A new booster pumping station was constructed by private 
interests at the juncture of Wobum Street and Industrial Way. This will be turned over to the Town for 
operation at no cost to the Town. 



General Distribution System Additions and Improvements 



About 2^ miles of new mains were added as follows: 



By Builders ; 



Street 



Size of Main 



Number of Feet 



Crescent Street 
Presidential Drive 
Roosevelt Road 



8" 
8" 
6" 



277 
750 
U70 



Under the Betterment Act; 



Andover Street & Upton Court 



12" 



10,000 



As Improvements to the System ; 



Canal Street 
Lake Street 



12" 
12" 



750 
600 



l6 new hydrants and 8^ new services and meters were added to the system. 



GMBRAL 



Water rates were the subject of considerable study by the Commissioners due to comments in recent Town 
Meetings that a \miform rate should be used instead of the CTirrent stepped rate. The study indicated that 
in the opinion of the Commissioners in office at that time, the uniform or so-called fair rate would 
impose an unfair burden on the large consumers, and would not be in the best interest of the Town as a 
whole. However, the study also disclosed that the stepped rate system was \mduly complicated and could be 
improved. The current Commissioners, being charged by statute to impose fair and equitable rates, decided 
to seek expert advice. Accordingly, after several interviews the firm of Coffin and Richardson was engaged. 
The firm's report will be used as a guide to future rate assessments. 

Early in the year the Board of Commissioners resigned due to lack of support by the Town Meetings for vital 
programs concerning water quality, supply and distribution. Mr. Vincent McLain and Mr. Robert Miillarky, 
both experienced and dedicated to the Town's welfare, would not accept reappointment. Mr. George R. Allan 
and Mr. Paiil P. Matizlewicz were appointed as replacements and George R. Allan was elected Chairman. 



The program for this system extending from Eames Street to Ballardvale Street, which had stagnated for more 
than a year due to lack of funds, was reactivated through the appropriation of $7 » 000, 000. voted by the 
Special Town Meeting of June 23, 19lS- Elngineering is essentially completed, both for the sewers and ease- 
ment acquisition for the initial phases of the extension. Because such a massive program is extremely 
complicated and will require full time attention, the Town Manager and Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners 
have under consideration, the hiring of a f\ill time coordinator. 



The Board entered into a yearly renewable agreement with the Town of Billerica that for $10,000 septic tank 
wastes may be disposed of at a designated location in the main sewer in the industrial area of Wo bum Street. 
The Town of Tewksbury was also allowed to use the same facilities for one month at the same rate of reimburse- 
ment. Both towns obtained prior permission from the Metropolitan District Commission. A system of checks 
has been instituted to see that only septage from Burlington, Wilmington and Tewksbury is disposed of by 
Town appointed carriers. 

The Town Engineering Department completed a study of an improved disposal facility to provide off-street 
dumping as well as a shelter for a full time checker required by the M.D.C. 



SEWER SYSTEM 



Silver Lsike Interceptor 



General 



k9 



Board of Appeals 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case # 1-75 
Robert G. Salines 



Case # 2-75 
Robert S. Kerr 
Dorothy H. Kerr 

Case # 3-75 
Howard Grossman 
d/b/a Potomat Corp. 
Murray- Kelly Corp. 

Case # U-75 

Baratta Realty Company 
Joseph P. Courtney, Agent 



Case # 5-75 

Baratta Realty Company 
Joseph P. Courtney, Agent 



Case # 6-75 

Baratta Realty Company 
Ernest & Patricia Kilgore 
Joseph P. Courtney, Agent 

Case # 7-75 

Ernest & Patricia Kilgore 
Joseph P. Courtney, Agent 



Case # 8-75 

Joseph A. LaCreta 

Joseph P. Courtney, Agent 



Case # 9-75 
Milton J. Babcock 



To acquire authorization for the temporaiy use of 
a trailer on a parcel of land at 379 Salem Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect an addition within 
a reserve side yard at 6 Marion Street. 



To acq^lire a variance to erect additional signs, 
area in excess of Shopping Plaza master plan, at 
25-35 Lowell Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient depth on 
Roosevelt Road. 



To acquire a variance to erect a single family 
dwelling on a lot on Roosevelt Road having 
insufficient depth. 



To acq\iire a variance to erect a single family 
dwelling on a lot on Roosevelt Road having 
insufficient depth. 



To acquire a variance to erect a single family 
dwelling on a lot on Roosevelt Road having 
insufficient depth. 



To obtain a variance from the provisions of the 
Zoning By-Law to authorize the operation of a 
restaurant for the sale, on-site consumption and 
take-out of food and non-alcoholic beverages 
without dancing or entertainment at the railroad 
station building at k33 Main Street which is owned 
by the applicant. 



To obtain a variance to erect a single family 
dwelling on said lot located on Commonwealth Ave. 
having insufficient depth. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Withdrawn 



50 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case # 10-75 

DeCrosta Florist, Inc. 

Stephen DeCrosta 

Case # 11-7$ 

Candlewood Village Assoc. 



Case # 12-7$ 
Steve Choi 



Case #13-7$ 
Donald P. Rossi 



Case # lU-7$ 

Carl R. & Ann M. Vayo 

William H. Diamond, Agent 



Case # l$-7$ 

Francis A. & Mary Harvey 



Case # 16-7$ 
I I. Fred DiCenso 



Case # 17-7$ 
Hillcrest Realty, Inc. 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 

Case # 18-7$ 

Joseph & Joanne Vilasi 



Case # 19-7$ 

Paul R. & Catherine Burke 



Case # 20-7$ 

C. J. & J. M. Theriault 



Case # 21-7$ 
Donald P. Young 



For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at Granted 
Wilmington Plaza, Main Street. 



For a comprehensive permit pursiiant to Massachusetts Granted 

General Laws, Chapter i|OB, Section 20-23, Low and 

Moderate Income Housing, to construct 276 Apartment 

Units on parcels of land owned by Wobum Street Realty 

Trust and Paxil K. and Donna 0. Butt, all located on 

Wobum Street and supposed to contain according to said 

application 28.2 acres of land. 



For a variance to subdivide a parcel into two non- Denied 
conforming lots, both having insufficient frontage, 
on a lot at 13 Cottage Avenue. 

For a variance to build a garage within a reserve Granted 
side yard on a lot at ll| Fairmeadow Road. 

To obtain a variance as to street frontage for Granted 
approval of new plan to replace earlier plan not 
recorded for a lot at 3$ Boutwell Street. 



For a variance to erect an addition within the Granted 
required reserve side yard on a non- conforming 
lot on r^y'stic Avenue. 



To acquire a variance from Section IV-3 A. 8 which Granted 
required one (l) parking space for each 200 sq. ft. 
of floor area on Progress Way. 



To obtain a special variance to allow the construction Denied 
of a road way for the construction of residential homes 
within the Flood Plain District off of Federal Street. 



To obtain a variance to erect a dwelling on a non- Denied 

conforming lot having insufficient area and depth 

on Harvard Street, presently known as Pembroke Street. 

To obtain a variance to alter an existing structure Granted 
located within a required reserve front yard at 
6 Lockwood Road. 

To obtain a variance to erect an addition within a Granted 
reqiiired reserve side yard at $ Fairmeadow Road. 



For a variance to build an addition to existing Granted 
dwelling located within the reqtiired reserve front 
yard at State Street and Fairview Road. 



51 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case # 22-7$ 
Charles E. Gullage 
Paul L. Brooks 



Case # 23-7$ 
Kevin C. Sullivan 



Case # 21;- 7$ 
Kevin C. Sullivan 



Case # 2$-7$ 
Robert Newton 



To acquire a variance to sub-divide lot at Ik and 
II4A Chestnut Street into two lots having insufficient 
frontage, area, and depth. 



To obtain a variance to construct a dwelling on a 
lot on Burlington Avenue having insufficient depth. 



To obtain a variance to construct a dwelling on a lot 
on Burlington Avenue having insufficient depth. 



To acquire a variance to allow for an "In-Law" 
apartment in a residential district at 17 Winter 
Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case # 26-75 
Arthur Alford 



To acq-uire a variance to install a pool within a 
required reserve side and rear yard at 10 Pleasant 
Street. 



Granted 



Case # 27-75 

Fred F. Deban 

Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



Case # 28-75 

Clayton & Alice Wentzell 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family Granted 
dwelling within the required reserved yard area on a 
lot located at Royal Street. 



To obtain a variauice to install a swimming pool within Granted 

the reqiiired reserve rear yard on a lot located on Swain 

Road. 



Case # 29-75 
Richard Zambemardi 



Case # 30-75 
Timothy E. Strob 



Case # 31-75 
Kevin J. McMillan 



Case # 32-75 
William J. Redler 



Case # 33-7$ 
Victor A. Manni 



Case # 3U-75 

Joseph & Margaret Calandrello 



To obtain a variance to erect a garage at 5 Elwood Road 
within the required reserved side yard. 



To obtain a variance to erect a two-car garage within 
the reserve side and rear yard at 8 Cypress Street. 



To obtain a variance to build a single family dwelling 
on a lot at 2l| Parker Street having insufficient depth. 



To obtain a variance to erect an addition within the 
reqiiired reserve side yard at I63 Lake Street. 



To obtain a variance to install a swimming pool within 
the required reserve side yard at 8 Edwards Road. 



To obtain a variance to b-uild a single family dwelling 
on a lot on Nassau Avenue having insufficient depth and 
area. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



52 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case # 35-7^ 

Anthony & Roberta Bimbo 



Case # 36-7^ 
Jaoaes A. Newhouse 



Case # 37- 7g 
Joseph A, Langone 



Case # 38-75 
Ernest Sandberg 



Case # 39-75 

Richard & Pearl Puller 



Case # UO-75 

TJmberto & Carmela Arzilli 



Case # I|.l-75 
Hewlett Packard 



Case # h2-7^ 

Peter & Alice Lepore 



Case # U3-75 
William T. Foreman 



Case # Uh-75 

Elmer & Marion Woller 



Case # U5-75 

Martin & Mary Kuchler 



Case # U6-75 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. 



Case # U7-75 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. 



To obtain a variance to allow for the temporary Granted 
use of a house trailer at 21 Marjorie Road. 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family Withdrawn 
dwelling on a lot located at 23 Dell Drive having 
insufficient frontage. 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family Withdrawn 
dwelling on a lot located at Nassau Avenue having 
insufficient frontage. 



To acquire a variance to erect an addition to the Granted 
existing dwelling on Faulkner Avenue within the 
reqTiired reserve side yard. 



To obtain a variance to convert a single family Granted 
dwelling to a two- family home at 2^ Columbia Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect a carport at 1 Nunn Denied 
Road within a required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance to construct an addition on Granted 
the existing building at the Northern Industrial 
Park within the required reserve side yard. 



To obtain a variance to erect a single family dwelling Withdrawn 
on a lot on Parker Street having insufficient frontaige 
and area. 



To acqTiire a variance to allow a Commerical Greenhouse Granted 
on 60,000 sq. ft. of land in accordance with Section III, 
I B 9» property located on Lee Street. 



To acquire a variance to conduct a Home Occupation within Granted 
a single family dwelling at 29 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect a swimming pool within the Granted 
required reserve side yard at li; South Street. 



To acquire a variance to build a single family dwelling Withdrawn 
within the req\iired reserve side yard at a lot on Franklin 
Avenue . 



To acq-uire a variance to build a single family dwelling Withdrawn 
on Franklin Avenue within a required reserve side yard. 



i 



53 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case # U8-7^ 
Richard MacDonald 



Case # 

Avco Systems Division 
Robert T. Callahan, Agent 

Case # $0-75 

Charles & Ruth Doucette 



Case # 51-75 

Jak-Len Wilmington Realty Trust 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



Case # 52-75 
Carlo Francella 



Case # 53-75 
Carl T. Davidson 



Case # 5U-75 

Kenneth & Harriett Soderholm 



Case # 55-75 
Joseph Maison 



Case # 56-75 
Winston F. Corhett 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



Case # 57-75 

I. Fred & Carlo DiCenso 

Triangle Import Corp, 

Case # 58-75 
Anna L. Sullivan 



Case # 5 ^ 7 5 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. 



To acquire a variance to conduct a Commercial Denied 
Business in a SRB Zone at 2 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect signs within a Granted 
reserve yard area at 201 Lowell Street. 



To acqtiire a variance to erect a shed within a Granted 
reqiiired reserve side and hack yard at 13 Allen 
Park Drive. 



To acquire a variance to erect a single family Granted 
dwelling on Freeport Drive within a reserve 
required side yard. 



To acquire a variance to build aji addition Denied 
within the reqtiired reserve side yard at a 
lot on 687 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance in accordance with Section III, Granted 
B-U to maintain a Day-Care Center within a single 
family dwelling at 57 Salem Street. 



To acqiiire a variance to demolish the existing Granted 
dwelling at Veranda Avenue and b^lild a two- 
car garage on the existing foundation. 



To acquire a variance to erect an addition to Granted 
the existing dwelling at 56 Chestnut Street 
within a reserve front yard. 



To acquire a variance to allow construction of Granted 
a building within the required reserve rear yard 
depth. Section V-1, located on Lopez Road. 



To acquire a variance in accordance with Section III- Granted 
ij.-B-3> to package food products in an industrial 
district, located at 68 Industrial Way. 



To acquire a variance to build a single family Granted 
dwelling on a lot at I98 Salem Street having 
insufficient frontage. 



To acquire a variance to build a single family Granted 
dwelling on Franklin Avenue within a required 
reserve side yard. 



54 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case # 60-75 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. 



Case # 61-75 

Domenic & Josephine Tutela 



Case # 62-75 
Paul G. Godzyk 



To acquire a variance to btiild a single family- 
dwelling on Franklin Avenue within a required 
reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance to build a garage within a 
required reserve side and front yard on a lot 
located at I8 School Street. 



To acquire a variance to replace an existing 
trailer home with a new trailer home on a lot 
on 11 Forest Street. 



Granted 



Denied 



Denied 



Case # 63-75 

Herbert & Joanne Mueller 



Case # 6U-75 

David J. Gagnon 

Colonial Mall Realty Trust 



Case # 65-75 

George & Catherine Cook 

Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



Case # 66-75 
Joseph A. LaCreta 
Edward Batten, Agent 



Case # 67-75 

Richard & Carol Vannelli 



Case # 68-75 
Carl A. Backman 



Case # 69-7^ 

Edward G. Bradbury, Sr. 



Case # 70-75 

John & Dolores Marshall 



To acquire a variance to erect an addition to an 
existing structure within a required reserve side 
yard at I6 Grace Drive. 



To acquire a variance from the zoning sign By-Law 
Section III-3-B-5 which regulates the location and 
area of signs in a Gene3?al Business District at 
35 Lowell Street, 



To acquire a variance to e2?ect a single family 
dwelling on a lot at 133 Nichols Street having 
insufficient frontage and area. 



To acquire a variance to erect a sign not to exceed 
one sq. ft. for each linear foot of frontage in 
accordance with Section III-3-B-5 within a reserve 
front yard at k33 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance within the required reserve 
side and rear yard area to erect a tool shed at 
61 Park Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient frontage 
at 151 Chestnut Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect a garage within 
a required reserve side yard area at 35 Beacon 
Street. 



To acq^d.re a use variance as authorized by the Board 
of Appeals to establish an Amb\ilatory Care Center in 
a residential district at 255 Lowell Street. Section 
III-B-2. 



Granted 



Granted 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



55 



I 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case # 71-75 
Analog Devices, Inc. 



Case # 72-75 
Analog Devices, Inc. 



Case #73-75 
Michael Monico 



Case # 7U-75 

Reading Cooperative Bank 
Edward Batten, Agent 



Case # 75-75 
William T. Foreman 



To acquire a variance to erect a structure 
within a required reserve side yard area at 
829 Wo bum Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect a structure 
within a required reserve side yard area at 
829 Wobum Street. 



To acquire a variance to install an inground 
pool within the required reserve rear yard 
area at l57 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect three signs not 
to exceed one sq. ft. for each linear foot of 
frontage in accordance with Section III-3-B-5 
with a reserve front yard at 353 Middlesex 
Avenue . 



To acquire a variance to allow a Commercial 
Greenhouse on 60,000 sq. ft. of land in accordance 
with Section III-I-B.9 of the By-Laws. Property 
located on Garden Avenue. 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Case # 76-75 

Victor & Gertrude Dubois 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



Case # 77-75 
William H. Drugan 



Case # 78-75 
James J. Gilligan 



Case # 79-75 

Edmund & Dolores Romanski 



Case # 80-75 
Graham Builders 
Merrimack Valley Goodwill 
Industries 



To acquire a variance to erect a single family 
dwelling on a lot on Auburn Avenue, having 
insufficient area and depth. 



To acquire a variance to erect a garage within 
the required reserve yard area at 7 Chandler Road. 



To acquire a variance to sub-divide a parcel of land 
into two lots, one having insufficient frontage but 
twice the req\iired area at 263 Middlesex Avenue. 



To acquire a variance to biiild an addition to the 
existing dwelling within the required reserve side 
yard at i| Wedgewood Avenue. 



To acquire a variance to allow the sale of used 
merchandise on the premises at Ulh Main Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case # 81-75 
Dennis F. Denault 



To acquire a variance to sub-divide a parcel into 
two lots at 31 Marjorie Road, one having insufficient 
frontage and required area. 



Granted 



56 



Historical Commission 



During the past year the memhers of the Wilmington Historical Commission have worked tirelessly in an effort 
to discover, doctunent and preserve various aspects of Wilmington's interesting and varied history. Present- 
ly there is in progress an extensive study of approximately twenty surviving pre-Revolutionary War houses. 
Once these houses have been fully researched and docmented, another study will begin which will include 
those homes built before the Civil War. 

As a contribution to the Bicentennial Commission's "Colonial Living Arts Festival" held in May, Mrs. Adele 
Passmore prepared a photographic map study of thirty-six historical houses as they stand in Town today. 
Eventually, this map will be put on permanent display at the Memorial Library in the proposed local History 
Room. Of special interest at this time are those men who served in the Militia and with the Minute Men of 
Wilmington during the Revolutionary War. Mr. William Meyer is doing extensive research in this area and has 
completed a Muster Roll with geneological notations. In June Mrs. Rebecca Rupright, a descendant of the 
Jacqulth family, one of the first families to settle in what is now Wilmington, spoke at the Library on her 
research relevant to the men of Wilmington who served in the Revolutionary War. 

In order that historical sites and possible remaining artifacts will not be destroyed during the construc- 
tion of the proposed Rt. 129 By-pass, the Commission is keeping a close watch on all proposed routes. Two 
members of the Commission are sitting on the Rt. 129 By-pass Project Working Committee. In April the 
Commission received notification from the National Park Service that the Col. Joshua Hamden Tavern has been 
accepted for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. With listing comes qtialification for 
available Federal funding. To date the Commission has lacked sxifficient time and money to do much to restore 
and develop the Tavern. However, some progress has been made, with the major project for this year being 
the restoration of the chimney. 

The Commision has in mind the 250th Anniversary of the founding of the Town of Wilmington (198O) as a more 
realistic goal for the completion of the initial restoration plans for the Tavern. These plans project a 
Town Museum and Educational Center. An architectural consultant and archeologist, Mr. Curtis Chapin, who 
is affiliated with the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, has been hired to draw up 
a three year Plan for the development of Hamden Tavern. Mr. Chapin 's proposal will include long-range 
plans for uses of the Tavern, its grounds and outbuildings, and will also serve to advise the Assistant 
Town Manager on applications for grants and other funding. Application has already been made for several 
grants. With the guidance of Mr. Chapin, several test holes were dug on the Tavern grounds during the fall 
by interested students from the local history classes, and several artifacts of interest were uncovered. 
An excavation of the foxmdation wall of the northern ell is proposed for the spring of 1976. At the request 
of the High School History Department, several guided tours of the Tavern have taken place involving a 
number of students and teachers, and plans are now being developed for another town-wide Open House to be 
held early in I976. 

The resignations of Mr. Parker Prindle, Mr. Walter Kohler and Miss Hope Hathaway have been accepted with 
regret during the year. The three new members welcomed to the Commission to fill the resulting vacancies 
are Mrs. Melinda Murphy, Mr. Frank C^lrley and Mr. Foster Balser. The Historical Commission extends thanks 
to all of those individuals. Boards and Committees who have given time and assistance whenever and wherever 
it was needed, and who have cooperated with the aim of the Commission in its attempt to revive and disperse 
knowledge of Wilmington's unique historic past. 



57 



Cemetery Department 



Burials in 1975 s 

Residents died in Wilmington 

Residents died elsewhere 

Non- re sident s 

Babies 

Cremations 

Transfers 



9 

51 
35 
3 

2 

1 



Receipts ; 



Intements 
Liners sold 

FoTindations for monuments 
Setting markers 
Affidavits 



$6,255. 

1,61+0. 

1,239. 
195. 

|k. 

«9,353. 



101 



Trust Fund: 



Reserve: 



Pei?petual Care 



$10,350. 



Sale of Lots 



$10,736. 



Regular maintenance was cairied on throughout the year. During the growing season the mowers were running 
constantly during the week. A number of sunken graves and those without grass were reloamed and seeded. 
Several old monuments that had fallen over were set in place. The unused avenue "by the veterans' lot was 
graded, loamed and seeded. A large area was cleared of bmish and wood to make way for another section of 
lots. The stumps were dug out and hauled away. About 700 tons of fill were hauled with our own trucks and ) 
graded with our tractors. 

The office building was painted inside and out by the maintenance men. Tile was installed on the floor of ' 
the office, and a new gutter was installed on the north side of the bxiilding. Three boys from the Youth 
Corps worked for the department during the summer. They scraped and painted the fences and helped with 
raking and mowing. 

The cemetery men assisted on the Highway Clean-up day. The department plowed snow for the Highway Depart- 
ment as well as the Cemetery. The walks across the Common were cleared of snow. 

The department en^jloyees spent two days at the Town Park cleaning up cans, bottles, glass and debris in I 
preparation for the Recreation's Easter egg hunt. The diamond at the Town Park was graded for the soft ball i 
season. Thirty-five yards of shredded loam were spread on the outfield at the Town Park. The area will be 
seeded in the Spring of 1976. 

A large rock suitable for a moniment was located and haiiled to a monument company in Wobum. A plaque for 
William Butterworth was installed, and then the rock was placed at Concord and Federal Streets. A founda- 
tion was installed at the Rotary Park for a monument that was donated by the Rotarians. 

The plaque on the flag pole at the Common which was removed by vandals was replaced. A new cable which 
operated from inside the pole was installed for raising the flags. A water line was installed at the Common 
for watering the flower bed. 

The park department bleachers, the rubbish barrels and the barrels for the life lines at the beach were 
painted. The men cleared snow at Silver Lake for recreation using snow blowers. The Little League field 
was cleaned and set up for activities. Fertilizer and seed were spread on the field. Washings and sand 
were mixed and added to the diamond. New ropes were installed in the flag poles. The grass at the Hamden 
Tavern was mowed throughout the season. 



The Department is grateful to all the Town Officials and Departments who assisted during 1975. 



58 



Solid Waste Disposal 

With the information provided from a technical report prepared by Metcalf & Eddy, Inc. in January 1975 > 
the Solid Waste Disposal Committee proposed that a new sanitary lajidfill he developed and operated on the 
town-ovmed industrially-zoned land on the Wilmington-Wohum line, west of Route 38 and adjacent to the 
existing Town Dump. 

The Committee met with various Town committees and citizens' groups, and conducted a public information 
campaign in the Town Crier to inform the Town of the recommended plan. Articles were submitted to the 
March 8, 1975 Town Meeting for the puxpose of obtaining fimds for the initial development and operation 
of the new sanitary landfill. The estimated cost for the planned new landfill was $l80,000 a year which 
included a $1+0,000 year item for amortizing the $300,000 bond for site development. The sum of $2^,000 
to $50,000 a year would possibly be returned to the Town by charging for commercial/industrial dumping. 
The majority of those present at the March 8, 1975 Town Meeting voted against raising this money, and 
the articles were defeated. 

Since that time, various meetings have taken place between the Town and the present dump operator to 
better define the problem and to discuss potential corrective actions. However, the dump still is in 
violation of the Massachusetts Regulations for the Disposal of Solid Waste by Sanitary Landfill, and the 
June 11, I97U Order to cease these violations and develop an acceptable solid waste disposal plan for the 
Town, On December 19, 1975 > the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Engineering referred the 
Wilmington case to the Attorney General for legal disposition. 

Because it was clear at the March 8, 1975 Town Meeting that the Town wanted more information or alternative 
means of solid waste disposal, especially town collection, out-of-town haul and disposal via the State 
regionalization plan, the committee developed a report on the various alternatives which was completed 
in December. The report indicates that: 

1. Town-wide collection would double the cost of waste disposal, 

2. Out-of-town disposal is the most expensive of the practical alternatives, 

3. Regionalization is a good long term solution but is at least five years off, and 
U> The Town should start a recycling program. 

Although the existing dimp may be able to be rehabilitated as is claimed for a similar fee, the report 
concludes that a new town-owned, privately-operated sanitary landfill still appears the best overall 
method to solve the short term solid waste problem in Wil m ington. 




Championship Girls' Hocf(ey Team of Wilmington 



59 



Jury List 



(*Indicates Married Woman) 
(Revised - August 1, 1975) 



NAME 


Kfc<biUhlNL.tj 


OCCUPATION 


Alexander, Kenneth C. 


35 Burnap Street 


Gas Station Attendant 


Allen, Frankline E. 


86 Burlington Avenue 


Contract Consultant 


*Allgrove, Evelyn 


311 Middlesex Avenue 


Shipper /Receiver 


Amicangioli, Mary I. 


Zo Fairmeadow Road 


Bookkeeper 


Ardolino, Ernest E. 


1 Broad Street 


Foreman 


Arvanitis, John P. 


68 Middlesex Avenue 


Plasterer 


Ashley, James E.,Jr. 


17 Fay Street 


Controller 


Barber, Ronald J. 


253 Middlesex Avenue 


Traffic Mgr. 


Barclay, Wilfred M. 


436 Middlesex Avenue 


Sales Mgr. 


Beatrice, Lawrence E. 


6 Radcliff Road 


Personnel Mgr. 


Begonis, Martin S. 


12 Cedar Street 


Foreman 


*Bellissimo, Dorothea J. 


6 Carson Avenue 


Principal Clerk 


Bennett, Gertrude H. 


249 Middlesex Avenue 


Secretary 


Berger, Frederick D. 


94 Wobum Street 


Asst. Office Mgr. 


Bimbo, James F. 


35 Beeching Avenue 


Machinist 


Bova, Paul J. 


15 Salem Street 


Draftsman 


*Bransfield, Marion E. 


15 Glendale Circle 


Clerk Typist 


Breakey, Barbara K. 


63 Middlesex Avenue 


Secretary 


*Brennan, Ruth M. 


430 Middlesex Avenue 


At home 


Bright, George H. 


4 Lockwood Road 


Truck Driver 


Bruno, Gerard A., Jr. 


37 Oakdale Road 


Examiner 


*Burt, Lorraine B. 


4 Carson Avenue 


P.T. Secretary 


Carney, Irene K. 


20 King Street 


Accounting Clerk 


*Catalano, Alice V. 


12 Cedar Crest Road 


Cafeteria Worker 


Childs, William G. 


8 Linda Road 


Toll Service Assigner 


Chamberlin, Winston S., Jr. 


11 Glen Road 


Unemployed 


*Chislett, Hazel Jane 


20 Oakdale Road 


Cashier 


Clark, Sharon 


23 Floradale Avenue 


Secretary 


Cleary, Kenneth J. 


4 Hathaway Road 


Inspector 


Collins, James J. 


4 Maple Street 


Shipper 


Colucci, Barbara M. 


23 Shady Lane Drive 


Teletypist 


Conlin, Irene B. 


24 Lloyd Road 


Bartender 


Connors, Anna M. 


9 Shady Lane Drive 


Secretary 


Corey, Anthony G., Jr. 


67 Salem Street 


Mfg. Supervisor 


Coville, Vernon J. 


4 Powderhouse Circle 


Telephone Installer 


Crane, Roy B. 


30 MacDonald Road 


Project Engineer 


Crawford, Ralph M. 


3 Chase Road 


Line Supervisor 


Cunningham, Lillian 


27 Richmond Street 


Q. C. Inspector 


Curtis, Ruth A. 


7 Shady Lane Drive 


Q. C. Inspector 


Gushing, John P. 


3 Ring Avenue 


Employment Manager 



60 



Jury List ; (continued) 



NAME 


RESIDENCE 


OCCUPATION 


Davey, James J. 


10 Fairmeadow Road 


Teletype Inspector 


DeJongh, Jeri^ 


32 Salem Street 


Lab. Tech. 


DeLisle, Helen E. 


15 Belmont Avenue 


Secretary 


DelNinno, Silvio V. 


4 Pond Street 


Salesman 


Deming, David R. 


56 Federal Street 


Tile Setter 


Dentali, Ernest 


7 First Street 


Welder 


DiGirolamo, Mary A. 


8 Sprucewood Road 


Unemployed 


DiLeo, Mario A. 


51 Salem Street 


Coffee Service 


Dupuis, Wilfred J. 


8 Sudbury Avenue 


Office Mgr. 


*Ellis, Evelyn 


17 Oakdale Road 


Housewife 


Fama, Paul J. 


18 Oakdale Road 


Unemployed 


Field, Alyce 


6 School Street 


Secretary 


Fisher, Walter E., Jr. 


10 Mass Ave. 


Supervisor 


Flewelling, Kenneth A. 


9 Bumham Street 


Staff Buyer 


Fosgate, Fred C. 


126 Burlington Avenue 


Asst. Mgr. Spec. 


Foumier, Maurice J. 


8 Fitz Terrace 


Unemployed 


*Gallagher, Agnes B. 


14 Muse Avenue 


Reg. Nurse 


Gamlin, Robert G. 


5 Reading Avenue 


Public Accountant 


Garden, Barry E. 


96 Middlesex Avenue 


Accounting Clerk 


Gardner, Goldie 


281 Main Street 


Self-employed 


Garland, Donald R. 


2 Muse Avenue 


Salesman 


Gigante, Anthony T, 


15 Frederick Drive 


Prod. Mgr. 


Gilbert, Charles N. 


13 Church Street 


Die Maker 


Giles, Jacqueline E, 


80 Middlesex Avenue 


Secretary 


Gill, Joseph P,, Jr. 


7 Royal Street 


Engineer 


Gillis, Robert M. 


56 Main Street 


Asst. Credit Mgr. 


Giroux, Howard T. 


98 Aldrich Road 


Web Pressman 


Gosnell, Thomas D. 


1 King Street Ext. 


Engineer 


Graves, Sidney E. 


25 Washington Avenue 


Mechanic 


Grinder, Richard H., Jr. 


451 Middlesex Avenue 


Eng. Coordinator 


Hadfield, John F. 


1 St rout Avenue 


Q. C. Manager 


Hanson, Norma M. 


14 Linda Road 


P. T. Clerk 


Harvey, Beverly L. 


6 Parker Street 


Bookkeeper 


Hathaway, Hope M. 


397 Salem Street 


Unemployed 


Hatch, John Everett 


7 Marion Street 


Plant Engineer 


*Heim, Theresa M. 


18 S trout Avenue 


Director 


Hogan, Richard J. 


36 Oakdale Road 


Mechanic 


Hosmer, Raymond G. 


124 Shawsheen Avenue 


Service Mgr. 


Hudson, Donald H. 


17 Crest Avenue 


Engineering Aide 


*Hughson, Virginia M. 


10 Laurel Avenue 


At Home 


Hussey, Evelyn B. 


2 Martens Street 


Clerk 


lannacchino, Paul F. 


65 Salem Street 


Retail Sales Mgr. 


Jackson, George E., Jr. 


79 Salem Street 


Truck Driver 


Jackson, William A. 


4 Reading Avenue 


Real Estate Broker 


Jazwinski, Ronald F. 


5 Seaford Street 


Unemployed 


Johnson, Doris J. 


4 Shady Lane Drive 


Unemployed 


Johnson, Doris M. 


516 Shawsheen Avenue 


Switchboard Operator 


Johnstone, Helen A. 


27 Shady Lane Drive 


Samson's "495" 


Juergens , Lawrence 


74 Glen Road 


Unemployed 


Kalkanajian, Loretta 


1 Pilling Road 


Metagraphic Tech. 


Kane, Francis M. 


13A Parker Street 


N. E. Tel. & Tel. 


Keefe, Paul R. 


17 Linda Road 


Inspector 


Kelley, John V. 


113 Grove Avenue 


Retired 


Kelley, Josephine M. 


113 Grove Avenue 


Retired 


Krasznekewicz, Frank 


lA State Street 


Analyst 


LaCambria, Ralph V. 


23 School Street 


Jr. Civil Engineer 


LaCasse, Lawrence Wm. 


4 Davis Road 


Shipping & Receiving 



61 



Jury List (continued) 



XT AMTT 


IxTj O XL/ ij IN 




lj3iluC LTl y KO D e i t W • 




r\.eo. v_<xdXius iiuj . 


Landers, Harry J» 




xiioux diit-e DxQicer 


Leyden, Williain P« 


L\j oiiciay Liciiie uxxve 


P lant Supervisor 


IjinriBlianj JTaines J* 




O d X c o 11^ X . 


LiOwney , kodg r t n • 




lex. £\e pdX xiiLdn 


''^Malioney, Anne M« 


j7 L/ciivaclXc IXOcxQ 


Housewife 


Mahoney , David G • 


WdoLLJ-ltg LULi t^ILUc 


u iiuup xuy cu 


Martin, Diane F. 


^x jrxntiwooa ivOaQ 


Sec re tary 


Martins , John M» 


/ C ri £1 1 /I /^n A T 1 1 £2 


v^cx X xu X d Lxun lecn. 


o c c* 'a V T M £1 \1 

rXclobc:, riciXJ.llc ri« 




X d J\.t; X 


riaZZclJL XnX , Xj]-IlUcl ri« 




U X X X C c rig X . 


^^^^ovi"hiT Ti^ o £1 r\ TT 

rici^aiT L.ny , joocpn r • 


T Zl "R n T*<^V> T.T*^i^/1 R^o*^ 
XH" O X I. l-ll wUVJU ixUdU 


± X dU £> • fa L » rig X * 


Cicriugn. , joiin i • 


\J kjllX X o L Xilc X/ X X Vc 


r oi ciudn 


McMahon , Thoma s H • 


176 Middlesex Avenue 


Cost Dept. Mgr . 


rici^aj-u , iLveirecL r • 


/ I Mt <H /I 1 £1 O C»"V a TTQT^l 1 a 

/ X i*iXU.U X c: o t: A rWcLlLlc 


xjXcc. iijiigxneex 




XX^ VjXLIVc: rlVcHU-t; 


Ivc u X X c U 


"M"^i*"»*T T 1 ^ /-\ /—V v" j~r T5 

rier tx i-Lj ueOige jd* 


0\jO UIlc. o LILuL oLXccL 


Unemployed 


riorexix, Aixreu r • 


/ Wt:UUt::X oLXccL 


we xae x 


rio t ue 1 J. 1 1 1 , iNu.nzxu r« 


1 V T-J o 1" r» OT.Tr^TT T? ?3 /I 
LZ. ndLIldWciy iVUdU 


"C /~\ >" f!iTn ^ T> 

r O X cULcill 


Ml ilVii^llanH 'P'T"aT*ir*ic A 




T** r\ T" f^TTi a n 

i; X CilldLl 




V T aiiT*^ I A"\7onno 
Z. XidU X c X /VVCilvlC 


A t" TT/Trmo 


INdXIuU, JOocpil Li* 


Oft MaT'ioT*"i£i Rr*a<^ 
£^\j iidxjuxxc: ixL'ctU 


r^ixjil T7Ticynnoo"l* 
X V X X XilL^XLlcc X 


Needham, John E • 


^ ■< C ri "3 T.TO h c» on Aix^^mid 
j£.^ Dlldwollccll /iVctlU-c 


OLipc XVX faOx 


N i clce r s on , Ma ry M • 




DuoiCKeepex 


'^iNO 1 Lon , Ej ve lyn ri« 


^UH- WXXawOOQ oLXccL 


Housewife 


u i\.ourK.e , r raiiK i • 


xj DXxt-riwooa tvodo 


X a X u r o xeiudTi 


Utis, AiDert r, , Jr. 


24 Rai Iwood Avenue 


Gen. Mgr. 


r atncK , ceci i w • 


145 Cunningham Street 


Electrician 


ireaK, DonaiQ 


30 Marcus Road 


Adm • As St. 


Pease, Robert A« 


257 Middlesex Avenue 


Elec. Circuit Eng. 


r e 1 leg Lriiii J Hnnette o« 


4 Harold Avenue 


i\e LX reu 


Pendergast, Thomas J» 


17 Birchwood Road 


Retired 


Peters , George A. 


16 F a i rmead ow Ro ad 


Rep rod. Artist 


^Poloian, Elinor S • 


214 Andover S treet 


Keai hstate isroKer 


Pote, Ira T. 


1 LD woDum street 


Site Supr. 


Quinn, John J. , Jr. 


j/z woDum btreet 


Life Ins. Field Agent 


^Quinn, Margaret H. 


22 Frederick Drive 


Ins. Broker 


Regan, Cornelius J« 


J bt, Paul street 


Mech. Inspector 


Kandeii, LaVerne 


zU West Street 


Unemployed 


ixexnooit, uno-xries 


7 Sprucewood Road 


X iTucK uixver 


Ring, John S. Jr. 


Cunningham Street 


Systems Programmer 


Rogers, Walter A. 


24 Shady Lane Drive 


Custodian 


Roselli, Peter A. 


6 Webber Street 


Computer Programmer 


Russell, Esther L. 


10 Wildwood Street 


Town Clerk 


Russell, Williain H. 


10 Wildwood Street 


Retired 


Sargent, Alan H. 


41 Shady Lane Drive 


Machine Operator 


Shelley, Edward J, 


1 Atlantic Avenue 


Retired 


Sprague, George E. 


482 Middlesex Avenue 


Engineer 


Storey, William E. 


9 Pinewood Road 


Mechanic 


Sullivan, Helen M. 


38 Grove Avenue 


Sewing Teacher 


Taylor, Raymond L. , Jr. 


189 Woburn Street 


Prod. Supervisor 


Thomas, Edward A. 


13 Fairmeadow Road 


Lithographic Stripper 


Tonks, Phyllis Jean 


70 Aldrich Road 


Cafeteria Helper 


Trout, Robert T. 


14 Lawrence Street 


Retired 


Twombley, Norman C« 


12 Marjorie Road 


Accountant 


Virtus, John T. 


6 Ridge Road 


Supervisor 


Visconti, Anthony 


28 Nassau Avenue 


Retired 



62 



Jury List ; (continued) 



*Waruszyla, Jeanne C. 

Webster, Gail E. 

Weisberg, David 

Woller, Elmer H. 

Wood, Carolyn C. 

Woodbury, Richard B. 

Woods, Marjorie L. 

Woodside, Leo M. 

Worby, Frederick L. 

Worringham, Shirley A. 

Young, Donald 

Zaccagnini, Lorenzo A. 

Zahar, Joseph L. 

Zaino, Arthur L. 

Zanoni, Elizabeth H. 
*Zaverson, Barbara D. 

Zottoli, Frank D. 

Stygles, Daniel J., Sr. 



11 Lawrence Court 
45 Hathaway Road 
23 Salem Street 
29 Main Street 
18A Mystic Avenue 
16 Roberts Road 
23 Beacon Street 
14 Roberts Road 
316 Middlesex Avenue 
22 Marcus Road 
8 State Street 
305 Middlesex Avenue 
1 Birchwood Road 
20 Linda Road 
8 Pershing Street 
310 Middlesex Avenue 
38 Bumap Street 
18 Jones Avenue 



Housewife 

Teacher Aide 

Warehouseman 

Bldg. Supervisor 

Cost Clerk 

Service Mgr. 

Claim Investigator 

Asst. Chef 

Prod. Superintendent 

Adm. Secretary 

Self-employed 

Press Operator 

Salesman 

Sr. Engineer 

Secretary 

At Home 

Ref. Mechanic 

R. R. Signal Maintainer 



Council on 




This being the third Annual Report to the Citizens of Wilmington, the Council on Aging is very pleased with 
the accomplishments over the past year. The Council is comprised of eleven hoard members, appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen, and a director, recommended by the Council. The Council holds their board meetings 
the first and third Monday of each month at the Drop-in-Center located at Wilmington Plaza. Any one is 
welcome to attend these meetings, in fact, these meetings provide an excellent source for communicating 
the needs and desires of the Town's senior citizens. 

Any senior, age sixty or over, upon request may receive a senior citizen identification card. These cards 
are issued at the Senior Citizen Drop- In-Center which is open Monday throiigh Friday from nine- thirty in the 
morning until four- thirty in the afternoon. Game days are held on Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays. 
Wednesdays are arts and crafts and bowling. Tuesdays are health counseling days. Whist parties are held 
twice a month and dancing lessons once a month. The attendance at the Drop- In-Center has been approximately 
12,3i+5 for the year. These are seniors who are taking advantage of the programs offered, and those who just 
drop in to say hello. 

Some of the highlights of the year's activities were a Sweetheart Ball at the K of C Hall, a trip to Fenway 
Park for a Red Sox Ball Game, a production of "Fiddler On the Roof" put on by the Wobum Street School, a 
Halloween Party with costimies, a Thanksgiving Dinner at the Elks and one at the K of C, a Christmas dinner 
was given by Sweetheart Plastics, Inc. and several bus trips were taken this past year with more planned. 
There is something to satisfy every senior such as pokeno, poker, pool table, sewing lessons, arts and 
crafts, health counseling, mini-bus service, and dancing lessons. 

Sincere gratitude to the merchants of Wilmington who allow discounts and to other merchants who have been 
helpfxil and cooperative to seniors. On behalf of the senior citizens, the Coxmcil would like to express 
its appreciation to the following: Mr. M. Demo\ilas, who has provided the quarters and utilities which is 
the Drop- In-Center. We wish to thank Rotary, Kiwanis, Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks, Sons of Italy and the 
Khi^ts of Columbus who provided services to the senior citizens. Many thanks to the Crusaders of Wilmington 
for providing transportation, food and entertainment for a day at Wayland Park. 

There has been excellent participation by the seniors in all programs and activities. It is hoped that 
more senior citizens will become active and participating members of the community. 



63 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE (s) ACCEPTEI 



Adams Street 


from 


Aldrich Road 


from 


Allen Park Drive 


from 


Andover Street 


from 


Andover Street 


from 


Anthony Avenue 


from 


Apollo Drive 


from 


Arlene Avenue 


from 


Auburn Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


from 


Baker Street 


from 


B aland Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


from 


15 o ~] ~\ nt^^iT n~\ o ^4" T»o Ci'f* 

DcLxxai civaj-c ooicco 


from 


Bancroft Street 


from 


Barbara Avenue 


from 


Beacon Street 


from 


Beech Street 


from 


Beeching Avenue 


from 


.Belmont Avenue 


from 


Benson Road 


from 


Biggar Avenue 


from 


Birchwood Road 


from 


Birchwood Road 


from 


Boutwell Street 


from 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Brattle Street 


from 


Brentwood Avenue 


from 


Bridge Lane 


from 


Bridge Lane 


from 


Broad Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


from 


Burnap Street 


from 


Bur nap Street 


from 


Burt Road 


from 


Butters Row 


from 


Buzzell Drive 


from 


Canal Street 


from 


Carolyn Road 


from 


Carson Avenue 


from 


Carter Lane 


from 


Catherine Avenue 


from 


Cedar Street 


from 


Cedar Crest Road 


from 


Central Street 


from 


Chandler Road 


from 


Chapman Avenue 


from 


Charoltte Drive 


from 


Chase Road 


from 



Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 2,915 

Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line ^,7hO 

Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 2,31? 

Salem Street 180 

Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 11,300 

Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 300 

Charlotte Drive to Draper Drive 300 

Salem Street to Dorothy Avenue . 789 

Shawsheen Avenue 755 

Westdale Aveme to Crest Avenue 2i|0 

Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Avenue 68I4. 

Ballardvale Street 5itO 

Salem Street to Route 125 965 

Route 125 to Andover Line 12,000 

Liberty Street 1|00 

Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 850 

Church Street to Belmont Avenue 970 

Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 1j005 

Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue khO 

Columbia Street to State Street 980 

Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 61 6 

Salem Street to Ring Avenue 1,282 

Shady Lane Drive 1,197 

Judith Road UOO 

Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road hy'^hh 

Bridge Lane 510 

Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 950 

Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Avenue 1,066 

Wobum Street to ¥oodside Avenue 1,017 

Shawsheen Avenue i;55 

Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 75U 

King Street 1,377 

Main Street to Burlington Line 8,588 

Grove Avenue 1,1 i;5 

Winchell Road k&h 

Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 1,653 

Main Street to Chestnut Street 3,577 

Draper Drive to Evans Drive 600 

Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 1,505 

North Street to Marcia Road 1,268 

Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 1,01 7 

Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Norfolk Avenue 1,i;11 

Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 1 ,000 

Burt Road to Harris Street 687 

Pinewood Road to Judith Road 1,100 

Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 552 

Adams Street to Kelley Road hOO 

Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 1,575 

Gunderson Road to beyond Apollo Drive 859 

Hathaway Road 297 



908 
891; 
971 
891; 

89U 1970 

966 

971 

966 

9ii5 

9k7 

9U5 
972 
89U 
89U 
952 
966 
915 
9i;7 
959 
933 
971 
975 
952 
953 

89ii i960 197' 
933 1 9i;3 
933 1 9h3 
916 
938 
891; 
89I1 
95I1 
891; 
953 
9i;5 

9\6 I9i;6 
891; 
971 

939 1955 
960 1971 
961 
957 
966 
9i;5 
963 
950 
957 

951 1971 
971 
953 




Public Ways (continued) 



Street 



Location 



Length 



Date (s) Accepted 



Chestnut Street 


from 


Church Street 


from 


Clark Street 


from 


Cochrane Road 


from 


Columbia Street 


from 


Concord Street 


from 


Congress Street 


from 


Cook Avenue 


from 


Coolidge Road 


from 


Corey Avenue 


from 


Cottage Street 


from 


Crest Avenue 


from 


Cross Street 


from 


Cunningham Street 


from 


Cypress Street 


from 


Dadant Drive 


from 


Davis Road 


from 


Dayton Road 


from 


Dell Drive 


from 


Dobson Street 


from 


Dorchester Street 


from 


Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Draper Itive 


from 


Druiy Lane 


from 


Dublin Avenue 


from 


Dunton Road 


from 


Eames Street 


from 


Edwards Road 


from 


ELwood Road 


from 


Einerson Street 


from 


Engle wo o d Dr ive 


from 


Evans Drive 


from 


Fairfield Road 


from 


Fairmeadow Road 


from 


Fairmont Avenue 


from 


Fairview Avenue 


from 


Faneuil Drive 


from 


Faulkner Avenue 


from 


Fay Street 


from 


Federal Street 


from 


Ferguson Road 


from 


Florad&le Avenue 


from 


Fordham Road 


from 


Forest Street 


from 


Frederick Drive 


from 


den Road 


from 


Glendale Circle 


from 


j Glenview Road 


from 


Govring Road 


from 


Grace Drive 


from 


Grand Street 


from 


Grant Street 


from 


' Grove Avenue 


from 


Grove Street 


from 



Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 
Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street to Church Street 
Forest Street to Wabash Road 
Church Street to beyond Belmont Avenue 
Federal Street to No . Reading Line 
Forest Street to Burlington Line 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 

Canal Street to Grand Street 
Main Street 
Ayotte Street 

Ma±n Street to Lowell Street 
Salem Street to Beeching Avenue 
Glen Road 

North Street to North Street 

Main Street 

Hathaway Road 

Burlington Avenue 

Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 

Billeidca Line 

Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 
Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 
Glen Road to School Street 
Main Street 
Nassau Avenue 

Main Street to Wobum Street 



Main Street 

Nichols Street to Nichols Street 
Malloy Road 
State Street 

Massachusetts Avenue to beyond Harvard Avenue 

Glen Road to Jacobs Street 

Glen Road to Garden Avenue 

Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 

Shawsheen Avenue 

Burlington Avenue 

North Reading Line 

Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 

Salem Street 



Street 



11,i;80 

2,h70 
800 
1,150 
5,803 
977 
813 
270 
366 
927 
558 
697 

260 

1,760 

500 
170 
1,79ii 

hh02 

1,211+ 
1,i;90 
1,560 
633 
500 
6ii9 

3,200 
ii5o 

6i|2 
590 

ii55 
2,071 

1,299 
2,328 
952 

61;8 
790 
1,9l;6 
2,612 
5,7i;0 
1,073 
627 
3,71ii 
i;,lOO 
1,070 

6,870 

1,30J4 
365 
9U1 

2,5lii 
815 
780 

U,1U7 
120 



891; 
891; 

89I1 1969 
9l;7 

908 1 933 

89^ 

939 

9l;6 

951 

951 

951; 

9l;7 

891; 

9kh 1953 1952 
951 

961; 
952 
951 

958 1971 
951; 

951 

960 

959 1971 
963 

951 
956 

891; 
9l;7 
968 
951 
971 
971 

9i;6 
958 
971 
933 
950 

9I4I; 1953 

938 1 9l;5 

891; 

967 

970 

971 

891; 

966 

89I; 
952 
959 
956 
966 
952 
9l;3 
910 
957 



65 



Public Ways (continued) 



Street 




Location 


Length 


Date 


(junderson Road 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1,506 


1959 


Hamlin Lane 


from 


Lawrence Street 


5i;0 


1962 


Hanson Road 


from 


Woodland Road 


838 


1969 


Hardin Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 


i;26 


1951 


Harnden Street 


from 


Main Street to Glen Road 


600 


I895 


Harold Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 


1,312 


1971 


Harris Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


806 


191+5 


Harvard Avenue 


from 


Main Street to River Street 


U30 


1951 


Hathaway Road 


from 


Wob\irn Street to Evans Drive 


3,270 


1951 


Hawthorne Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


230 


1971 
1956 


High Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 




I89li 


Hillside Way 


from 


Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


2,230 


I9II; 


Hilltop Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


36h 


1959 


Hob son Avenue 


from 


Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


1,56o 


I9li5 


Hopkins Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,051 


I89U 


Industrial Way 


from 


Woburn Street to West Street 


1;,J430 


I97U 


Jaquith Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,398 


1938 


Jere Road 


from 


Fainneadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


l,2li8 


1968 


Jones Avenue 


from 


Glen Road 


71 7 


191+0 


Judith Road 


from 


Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


hoo 


1953 


Kelley Road 


from 


Chandler Road 


923 


1957 


Kendall Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 


1,Ii20 


I9IJ.5 


Kenwood Avenue 


from 


Wobiam Street to beyond Englewood Drive 


1,725 


1970 


Kiernan Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 


693 


1958 


Kilmarnock Street 


from 


West Street to beyond Morgan Road 


1,8i;0 


I89U 


King Street 


from 


Glen Road to Broad Street 


2,ij.00 


I9lt0 


Kirk Street 


from 


Main Street 


575 


1951 


Lake Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3,855 


1891; 


Lang Street 


from 


Bancroft Street 


h09 


1952 


Laurel Avenue 


from 


Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 


Lawrence Court 


from 


Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 


Lawrence Street 


fTOm 


Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


ii,0l3 


1956 


Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1959 


Lexington Street 


from 


Cunningham Street to Morningside Drive 


711; 


1971; 


Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


7Uo 


19143 


Lincoln Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


19li3 


Linda Road 


from 


High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1,760 


1950 


Lloyd Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,050 


1951 


Lockwood Road 


from: 


Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 


Longview Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 


Loiomac Road 


from 


Drury Lane 


510 


1963 


Lowell Street 


from 


Main Street to Reading Line 


10,152 


1891; 


Lowell Street Park 


from 


Lowell Street 


580 


1908 


Mackey Road 


from 


Federal Street 


250 


I9l;3 


Magazine Road 


from 


Wisser Street 


320 


1973 


Magazine Street 


from 


Taplin Avenue 


190 


1973 


Main Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21,387 


1891; 


Marcia Road 


from 


North Street to beyond Carolyn Road 


2,806 


1962 


Marcus Road 


from 


Gowing Road 


2,315 


1958 


Marie Drive 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Gunderson Road 


1,525 


I96I 


Marion Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to beyond Clifton Street 


1,876 


19l;5 



1957 1958 



66 



Public Ways (continued) 

Street Location Length Date (s ) Accepted 

Marjorie Road from Main Street 1,392 19^1 

Massachusetts Avenue from Main Street to beyond Brattle Street 810 I9lj.5 

McDonald Road from Salem Street 2,621 I9I4J4 

Meadow Lane from Suncrest Avenue 361^ 1957 

Melody Lane from Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 21^5 I966 

Middlesex Avenue from Main Street to Salem Street 12,1i;0 1891; 

Miles Street from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 380 I9l;5 

Miller Road from Glen Road 638 ^9k^ 

Moore Street from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Wedgewood Avenue 1,528 196? 

jMoiningside Drive from Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 693 1971; 

Morse Avenue from Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 1,360 1939 

Mystic Avenue from Middlesex Avenue 598 I9D8 

j Nassau Avenue from Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 1,566 I9ii6 

[Nathan Road from Senpek Road 1,057 1971 

Nichols Street from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 3,80l 189li 

Nickerson Avenue from West Street 953 I9ii7 

Norfolk Avenue from Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 537 1951; 

North Street from Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 3,515 I9l;5 

Nunn Road from Kelley Road 211^ I965 

Oak Street from Salem Street 355 1951 

Oakdale Road from Short Street to Judith Road 2,301 1950 

Oakridge Circle from Gowing Road to Gowing Road 1,730 1958 

Oakwood Road from Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 800 I9l;6 

Olson Street from Church Street 122 1957 

Park Street from Wob\irn Street to North Reading Line 1;,180 I89I; 

Parker Street from Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 2,000 1907 1919 

Patricia Circle from Dell Drive 595 1958 

Pershing Street from Federal Street 720 I9l;3 

Phillips Avenue from Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 1,519 I9l;6 1951; 

(Pilling Road from Hathaway Road 9$k '^959 

Pine Avenue from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 380 I9l;5 

Pineridge Road from North Street to Linda Road 911; I96O 

Pineview Road from Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 1;50 1953 

Pinewood Road from Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 1,361; 1951; 

Pleasant Road from Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 750 1 962 

Powder House Circle from Middlesex Avenue 710 1951; 

Progress Way from Industrial W^y 630 1971; 

Radcliff Road from South Street to Benson Road 355 1971 

Railroad Avenue from Clark Street 65o 1909 

Redwood Terrace from Kenwood Avenue 61;5 1970 

Reed Street from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Harold Avenue 1,090 1971 

Richmond Street from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 1,800 1973 

Ridge Road from Suncrest Avenue 365 1956 

Ring Avenue from Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 1,1 50 1975 

River Street from Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Avenue 1;53 I962 

Roberts Road from Burlington Avenue to Burlington Avenue 1,861 I967 

Rollins Road from Marion Street to Fenway Street 200 1951t 

Roosevelt Road from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 1,980 I9l;6 

Route 62 from Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 3,3h3 1958 

Royal Street from Salem Street 1,0l;3 1951 

Salem Street from Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale Street 8,895 I89I; 

Salem Street from North Reading line to beyond Woburn Street 6,1;75 I89I; 



67 



Public Ways (continued) 

Street Location Length Date (s) Accepte 

Scaltrito Krive from Salem Street 785 I97i| 

School Street from Middlesex Avenue to beyond Drury Lane 1,139 191$ 1963 

Senpek Road from Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 280 1971 

Sewell Road from Hathaway Road 300 19$5 

Shady Lane Drive from Middlesex Avenue to Lawrence Street 2,90i; 19^0 1958 

Shawsheen Avenue from beyond Richmond Street to Billerica Line 11,814.5 I89ii 

Sherburn Place from Shawsheen Avenue 723 1975 

Sheridan Road from Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 2,021 1951 1971 

Sherwood Road from Forest Street to Cochrane Road Uh$ 1971 

Silver Lake Avenue from Lake Street to Dexter Street 14.55 1 95U 

Sprucewood Road from Shady Lane Drive 69O 1952 

State Street from Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 315 1933 

Strout Avenue from Lowell Street 908 1955 

Suncrest Avenue from West Street to Ledgewood Road 1,214.6 I95i| 

Swain Road from Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 2,290 1922 I929 

Taft Road from Boutwell Street to Swaiji Road 1,986 1938 

Taplin Avenue from Wisser Street 1461 19l;6 

Taplin Avenue from Baker Street 900 19ii6 

Temple Street from CSiurch Street . 2II4 I9II 

Thrush Road from Salem Street to Marie Drive 1400 I96I 

Thurston Avenue from Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 623 1907 

Trumaji Road from Hathaway Road 300 1953 

Unnamed Street from Salem Street to Andover Street 1470 1958 

Upton Court from Andover Street 500 18914 

Veranda Avenue from Main Street 8I47 191 6 

Virginia Road from North Reading Line to North Reading Line 1,1 05 I951i 

Walker Street from Main Street I423 1958 

Warren Road from Wightman Road to Tewksbiiry Line 97 195^ 

Washington Avenue from Clark Street to Stone Street 1,650 1920 

Webber Street from Burlington Avenue 677 1 969 

Wedgewood Avenue from Moore Street I476 I967 

West Street from Woburn Street to Reading Line 8,372 1891; 

Westdale Avenue from West Street 1,211 I9i42 

Wicks Circle from Everett Avenue 533 1971 

Wightman Road from Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 239 195U 

Wild Avenue from Grove Avenue 1,050 I9IO 

Wildwood Street from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 5,920 I89I4 

Williams Avenue from Main Street 706 19liO 

Wilson Street from Federal Street 760 19li3 

Wilton Drive from Shawsheen Avenue 1,151 1966 

Winchell Road from Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 193 I9ii5 

Wing Road from Wob\irn Street 7il6 1958 

Wisser Street from Main Street to Brand Avenue 1,1 ii6 1950 

Woburn Street from Andover Street to Woburn Line 23,122 I89I4 

Woodland Road from Lowell Street 1,1 7l| I969 



68 



Veterans^ Services 



Veterans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts Chapter ll5» with strict compliance 
to this Chapter, the rules and policies of which govern the dishursement of aid. Benefits are for the 
needy veteran and his immediate family who have been subject to unforseen needs. Pinal approval of 
benefits comes from the Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, M. 

The balance for the first six months of 1975 from previous appropriation was $59»063.i49« Money 
encumbered from remaining balance was $9 » 002.114. for payment of bills and benefits waiting for authoriza- 
tion for period ending June 30th 1975« Total available funds beginning July 1, 1975 were $8i4.,002.1i|. 
Total funds expended for aid to veterans and their families for 1975 were $71 » 056.76. 

Total reimbursement for 1975 from settled assignments and/or accident cases authorized by the Commissioner's 
Office was $6,690.14.0. Because SCP/o of the amoimt authorized by the Commissioner's Office is shared by the 
Town, the Town's share on assignment cases was $3»3U5.20. The total amount of $6,690.14-5 has been t^lmed 
over to the Town Tireasurer, and the Commonwealth has been notified so adjustment of any monies can be 
made before State reimbursement to the Town. 

This department deals continuously with new and changing benefits and/or laws pertaining to Social 
Sectirity and G. I. Education, plus aiding applicants for S. S. I. Unemployment due to strikes, shutdowns 
and lack of work always has an impact on expenditures, case load varies from time to time. 

The appropriation for 1975 aJ^d six months of 1976 was $75 » 000 as voted at the Annual Town Meeting, a 
balance of $56,035.06 forwarded for the first six months of 1976. 



Dog Officer 



Dogs Licensed 

Dogs Confined 

Complaints Covered 

Court Complaints 

Coiirt Pines Paid 

Dogs Disposed of 

Dogs Killed by Cars 

Residents Notified for Licenses 



1,8U9 
271 
3,291 



222 



$1,700 



U32 
61 
990 



69 



School Committee 




The School Committee of the Tovm of Vilmington herewith presents its report for the year 197?. The j 
present membership of the Committee is as follows: j 

John Nealon, Chairman 
John Brooks, Vice Chairman 
Hany Landers, Secretaiy 
Francis Ottati 
Dr. Frajicis Sullivan 
Richard Thackeray 

Wilmington opened its school doors this year on September 3i 1975» with a total enrollment of ^,2Ql^. 

SCHOOL BUILDING PROGRAM 

The School Committee, working with the school administration and the Permanent Building Committee, spent 
1975 considering various options to the proposed school building program that would improve the educational 
opportunities for our youngsters. Due to the uncertainty of the financial condition of the Commonwealth 
and its effect on reimbursement, and the general state of the economy in Wilmington, the Committee voted 
on November 5> 1975 "to request a one-year moratorium be placed on all school building construction in the 
community until further assessments can be made of the relevant economic conditions. 

Nothing here is meant to imply that the need for additional space no longer exists. The High School is 
still overcrowded, and it will reqiiire extensive renovation and capital replacement to bring it to an 
acceptable level for inmiediate use. The School Committee, at this writing, is cujrrently establishing 
priorities for renovation which will, hopefully, be developed as part of other appropriate municipal 
budgets. Presently, we still have seven (7) kindergarten classrooms being housed outside of our regular 
school facilities, and these have to be accounted for in any reasonable plan for improvement. The Committei 
is approaching the problem of school construction in a cautious and responsible manner, but at the same 
time, it is cognizant of the extreme space problems that will not resolve themselves. 

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING 

Dtiring 1975 » the School Committee negotiated contracts with the teachers, secretaries, mini-bus drivers, 
and with the system-wide directors. A three-year agreement through 1978 was reached with the directors. 
At this writing, the Committee is still negotiating with the principals and assistant principals on a new 
contract. We expect, also, to begin bargaining early in 1976 with the teacher aides, para-professionals, 
and part-time librarians for a new agreement. 

The School Conmittee has just ratified a two-year agreement with the Wilmington Teachers Association 
covering the 1975-1976 school year and the 1976-1977 school year with regard to salary and working conditioii 
for our teachers. 



70 



/ 



Salary ranges for the 1975-76 school year are as follows: (Number at right in parenthesis indicates 
number of people presently in that range.) 



Bachelor's Degree: $ 8,850 - $li|,250 (202) 

Bachelor's plus l5 S.H.: 9,l50 - li|,550 ( 2U) 

Master's Degree: 9,600 - l5,000 ( 70) 

Master's plus l5 S.H.: 9,900 - 15,300 ( Ik) 

Master's plus 30 S.H.: 10,250 - l5,560 ( l6) 

Doctorate: 10,850 - l6,250 ( 3) 



Salary ranges for the 1976-77 school year are as follows: 



Bachelor's Degree: 
Bachelor's plus l5 S.H.: 
Master's Degree: 
Master's plus l5 S.H. : 
Master's plus 30 S.H.: 
Doctorate: 



$ 9,500 
9,800 
10,300 
10,600 
11,000 
11,700 



$15,300 
15,600 
16,100 
16,1+00 
16,800 
17,500 



Each salary range for both years involves eleven (ll) steps from minimum to maximum. 



STAFF RECRTJITMENT 



As in the two previous years, the number of qualified teachers applying for jobs greatly exceeded the 
limited number of positions available. The school administration again received over 2,000 inquiries and 
applications from certified teaching personnel. A significant number of these inquiries were received from 
out of state universities. 

At the central administrative level Mr. Anthony J. DeLuca was appointed to the position of Business Manager. 

At the building administrative level, the Committee elected Dr. Charles F. Twomey to the position of 
Principal of the Shawsheen Elementary School. Mr. Douglas Anderson was appointed to the position of 
Assistant Principal of the same school. 

In addition, the Committee appointed Mrs. Joan Martin to the position of Supervisor of School Food Services 
to replace Mrs. Eileen Fuller who retired. 



The Committee continued to revise and update the curriculum offerings that are available to pupils in all 
grades. The new 12:30 p.m. Wednesday dismissal program resulted in additional individiial help being avail- 
able to several hundred elementary students. Curriculum Directors were responsible for several new in- 
service programs, and new elective co\irses were reviewed and implemented within the appropriate limitations 
of facilities and finances. 

New textbooks were adopted for courses at several levels. These included new books for BSCS Biology, Earth 
Science, Advanced Power Mechanics, and Basic Computer Programming. 



At the direction of the School Committee two study groups have been formed to consider alternative approaches 
to two areas of concern. In conjunction with the high school principal and the parent advisory council a 
study is being conducted on opportunities for bright students to accelerate their educational programs which 
might lead to early completion. Various options with local colleges and universities are being explored. 

Under the direction of two of our elementary principals, a committee has been formed to review our basic 
studies program at the elementary level. This study was initiated, at the direction of the School Committee, 
to consider alternative approaches to educational organization which may eventually give parents a wider 
choice of programs for their youngsters. 

Both study groups are calling on a wide variety of interests in formulating their memberships. 



CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AM) IMPROVEMENT 



SECONDARY ADVANCED PLACEMENT - ELEMENTARY BASIC STUDIES 



71 



\ 



DATA PROCESSING FEASIBILITY STUDY COMMITTEE 



Back in 197 3 » "the School Committee appointed a group of staff members and citizens to a committee to study 
our data processing requirements. This committee consisting of Jerry Hoi:i^hton, former Business Manager; 
William Pay, Principal; James Batcock, Mathematics Department Chairman; John I^ch, Mathematics Teacher; 
and citizens Richard Hayden, Thaddeus Lowry, George Sinmons, Edward Sousa, and School Committee Chairman 
John Nealon studied various alternatives which could provide some form of Data Processing capability to 
serve the present and future requirements of the Wilmington School Department. The goals, applications 
and justifications were presented to the Superintendent and the School Committee in an interim report in 
September of 197U. During this past year, Richard Hayden the acting chairman of the committee, has been 
an active member of the Shawsheen Regional Data Processing Advisory Group. It was determined that the 
regional vocational school would implement a program of Data Processing Study under its Phase II expansion 
program. 

On November 10, 1975 » the Data Processing Feasibility Study Committee reported their findings to the 
School Committee along with the following recommendations: 



1. That the Wilmington School Department enter into discussions immediately 
with Shawsheen relative to the use of their Data Processing facilities. 
Funds are currently in the budget for rental of outside timesharing services. 
These funds could be used to rent teiminals for connection to the Shawsheen 
system. 

2. That the Wilmington School Department hire a person to fill the position of 
Data Processing Administrator as previously budgeted. In our studies, we 
found that member towns in regional facilities failed to get the f\ill potential 
benefits of the system becuase they had no one to represent their interests in 
their own towns. We strongly recommend that Wilmington hire a qualified individual 
to guide and implement a strong Data Processing effort for Wilmington. 

3. That the Wilmington School Department create a set of priorities, both educational 
and administrative, by which the Data Processing Administrator may be guided in the 
development of omt Data Processing efforts. 



At this writing the School Committee has entered into discussions with Shawsheen Regional Technical Hi^ 
School relative to the utilization of their facilities. 



During the past year the regional technical high school has completed Phase II of its building expansion. 
This will undoubtedly be reported on in great detail in another section of this Town Report. Let it 
suffice here to say that this opening has meant that an additional 35 part-time students and an additional 
50 full-time students are now attending the regional facility. 



Requests for leaves of absence, resignations and retirements were granted to thirty (30) teachers for the 
following reasons: 



PHASE II - SHAWSHEEN REGIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 



RESIGNATIONS AND RETIREMENTS 



Resignations : 

Teach in Other Communities 
Continue Education 
Family Responsibility 
Counselled Out 
Career Change 



Leaves of Absence ; 
Sabbatical Leave 



Maternity Leave 
Graduate Study 



5 
h 
h 
3 
1 



1 
7 
3 



i 



72 



Retirements; 



The School Committee wishes to acknowledge the retirement of Mrs. Eileen Fuller who left 
active service as oirr Supervisor of School Food Services at the close of the l^lh-lS school 
year. Mrs. Fuller had devoted twenty-one years to the service of the community and its 
children. She was extremely active in the profession ajid she was respected by the Committee, 
Administration, teachers, cafeteria employees, parents and students. 

The Committee also wishes to recognize the retirement of Mrs. Virginia Erickson, our High 
School Librarian, who served our system for 19 years as a full-time teacher and 10 years 
as OTor librarian. Mrs. Erickson was instrumental in the library growth and improvement 
that took place at the High School over the past decade. Her dedication to improving our 
program is much appreciated by the Committee and the Administration, and her pleasant spirit 
and helpfTil attitude will be sorely missed by both teachers and students. 

The Committee extends its appreciation to both these ladies for their faithful service and wishes both 
a happy and fruitful retirement. 

The Wilmington Public Schools were in operation l80 days beginning September k, 197U and ending June 20, 
1975. The Committee held twenty-one (2l) regular meetings, ten (lO) special meetings, eighteen (I8) 
meetings relative to collective bargaining, four (i;) mediation meetings, one (l) public Budget Meeting, 
one (1) joint meeting with the Permanent Building Committee, for a total of fifty-five (55) meetings for 
the year 1975. 

The Committee extends its sincere appreciation to Town Officials, Town Departments, and to the citizens 
of Wilmington for their fine cooperation and assistance during the past year. 




Porky Muse in the flower bed 



73 



Superintendent of Schools 



I am pleased to submit the Annual Report of the activities of the Wilmington Public Schools of the year 
1975. i 

This has been a year of decision regarding the direction the system is going in the area of building I 
expansion. After careful study by many members of the school administration of various building options, I 
and after extensive cost analysis by the Permanent Building Committee of these several options it became J 
imperative that another factor be intensively considered namely, the tenuous financial condition of the j 
State and how that might affect the reimbursement. Even fiscal authorities at the state department level I 
will admit that they are unsure of the condition and future status of the School Building Assistance Bureau, 
The School Committee, on my recommendation, voted on November 1975 to request that a moratorium be placec 
on all school building construction and consideration for a period of one year in order to assess the futuxf 
financial developments more carefully. The School Committee and the Administration strongly felt that the 
Permanent Building Committee should continue its efforts to complete the "costing out" of the various build-i 
ing options since this information will be extremely useful to the town if it appears prudent to lift the 
moratorium, | 

The most immediate area of concern for all of us when we consider building programs has to be the high 
school. In an attempt to alleviate some of the problems of an overcrowded schedule and to streamline the 
management of a large building, several schools and curriculum departments have instituted changes this paslij 
year that, we feel, have improved the program for students. Space limitations here prevent me from discuss-i 
ing all of them. I will, therefore, highlight a few by school or subject area that we feel will interest 
many citizens. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL ^ 

A. Attendance - in response to the concerns of parents, teachers and students a new attendance procedure 
has been developed at the high school. Primarily, it consists of a letter going to the homes of 
students who miss a class. In addition, the parents of students who are absent are called daily. This 
procedure has resulted in a 3% increase in annual attendance for 1974-1975* and a 3% increase in Sept- 
ember, 1975. This means for the month of September, approximately 50 more students have been attending 
school daily. 

B. CTirricTilum Expo '75 - was held in February, 1975. At this time parents, students and facility members 
were invited to review a variety of exhibits demonstrating ovx curriculiam offerings. 

C. Arena Scheduling - For the first time at Wilmington Hi^ School students were able to resolve their 
own scheduling conflicts by going into an arena and selecting the period, teacher, and subject they 
wanted. This resulted in NO lines at the Guidance Office, the opening day of school, and contributed 
greatly to what has been described by students, faculty, and parents as the smoothest opening of school 
in years. 

D. Talented Youth - A task force was formed at the high school to examine the question of challenging our 
talented youth. Among the task force conclusions was that more opportunities are needed for youth to 
demonstrate their exceptional talents. 

E. This year nearly twice as many students have taken PSAT's (preliminary college boards) than in previous 
years (ll6 in 1975 versus 62 in 1974). 



7h 



NORTH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL RESOURCE ROOM 



The Resource Room (alias "W. C. Field's room") has found a permanent home at the North Intermediate School. 
The staff of the room offers remedial and tutorial help in all academic areas of the curriculum to students 
on a daily basis during study periods. The staff consists of a resource teacher, a part-time learning 
disability specialist and a part-time para-professional. Each staff member has been trained to deal with 
students on an individual and small group basis. 

j The Resoiirce Room is smaller than the average classroom, but has made maximum utilization of the space. It 
has been supplied with ample materials and equipment to deal with individual students' academic needs. The 
room has been decorated by the students themselves. 

ART 

' The Art Department provided leadership for the Wilmington Schools' participation in the Town's Colonial Arts 
and Life Festival on May 17. A bicentennial event, this provided the opportunity to view early crafts and 
cooking demonstrations, as well as dramatic productions by teachers and students who worked cooperatively 
with other community groups. 

We have instituted the new Design and Crafts Course at the High School level which was partially funded by 
1 NDEA Title III Grant. Fifty students took advantage of the opportunity to study and work with craft 

materials and design principles as they apply to the environment and daily life. This course gave rise to 
large wall graphics in both Art Rooms and plans for an outdoor reading area for the Town Library. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

The Business Education Department is pleased with the reception that our Personal Typing coxirse has re- 
ceived in the high school. Until now all students wishing to learn how to type have been forced to enroll 
in the Business Type I course. Now, in order to better meet the needs of all our students — especially the 
college bound students — we are offering this 2-^ credit semester course in which students are able to learn 
the basic fundamentals necessaiy to adequately meet their needs. 

In March of 1975> Wilmington High School Business Education students participated, along with 3^0 area 
students, in the Massachusetts Office Education Association Spring Leadership Conference in Hyannis, 
Massachusetts. Thirteen students from W.H.S. attended the conference out of which four received awards. 
In May, these winners went on to compete in the National Leadership Conference in Chicago. Elaine Freeman 
placed sixth in the Typing Competition and was the only student from Massachusetts to receive an award. 

ENGLISH AND LANGUAGE ARTS 

Model Spelling Program . During the 197U-75 school year, the Language Arts Coimnittee explored the area of 
: spelling instruction. They surveyed the elementary staff, read research reports, conferred with consult- 
ants, and discussed all facets of spelling. Four of the teachers on the committee continued the work 
during a summer workshop. As a result, a model spelling program is being tested by four elementary teachers. 
The model will be revised and implemented in grades K-6 in the 1976-77 school year. 

Title III Pro.ject in Language Arts. We were awarded a $1|,000 grant to utilize visual projects and activities 
in developing writing and language skills. Through the use of transparencies on skill development, film 
projects, and other audio-visual activities, two sixth grade teachers are developing a model program in 
Language Arts. 

Hi^ School Curriculum Revision. A committee of five English teachers is currently revising the instruction- 
al goals for grades nine and ten. The English electives are also being revised in order to insure more 
skill development and to provide more effective alternatives for all juniors and seniors. 



75 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE ; 

Wilmington Blgti French students participated in a live-in two-day total immersion program in French at 
Gordon College in June. Students from Andover, North Andover, Methuen, and I^ynnfield joined in to make 
the program a success. Total immersion requires students to speak French at all times — on the "bus ride 
over to Gordon College, in all activities while on campus, and on the return trip home. The program in- 
cluded French folk dancing, a demonstration of French cuisine, a feature-length French film, a lecture on 
slang, a volleyball game, French songs, a lecture and slide presentation on French Morocco, and discussion 
groups. The second day ended with skits presented hy each school. Comments such as "formidable" and 
"fantastique" convinced the leaders that the program was truly a success and plans were laid for next year' 
program. 

HISTORY (Local) 

The newly created Wilmington and the Commonwealth histoiy course appears to have hit a responsive chord in 
the high school student body. Over one hundred and fifty students signed up for the semester course this 
year, and if inqiairies about the course from non-enrolled students are any indication, next year will be 
even more promising. 

Students in the course have received a guided tour of the Hamden Tavern, participated in an exploratory 
archaeological dig behind the Tavern, followed the path of the Middlesex Canal through Wilmington, and 
retraced the route of the Wilmington Minutemen in 1775 to Concord and Lexington. Future plans for the 
co^lrse involve students working closely with the Town Library in developing cassette tours of Wilmington, 
slide programs of Wilmington's historic buildings, and an oral program to record what life in Wilmin^on 
was like at various periods in our recent past. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

The Industrial Arts program has developed a new curriculum for the first year Drafting student. Prior to 
this year the students in the Industrial Arts program did not have the opportunity to take Drafting. The 
new program now makes room for the students who take Woodworking I and Power Mechanics I to take Drafting 
at the same time. This is done by cutting back on the required amoxint of periods for Drafting and stream- 
lining the course. Next year we will go into Phase II so that students in Graphic Arts and General Metals 
can have Drafting and shop at the same time. 

MATHEMATICS 

The Mathematics Department has acquired 2$ calculators throug'h an NDEA project. These calculators are used 
by the students to acquire greater insight in problem solving, and as a motivational device to stimulate 
student interest. 

PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Innovations during the past year included the following items: We conducted a Health Fair jointly with the 
Board of Health, the Regional Health Center, Wilmington Chamber of Commerce, and the local Kiwanis Club. 
(The financial aspect was underwritten by Kiwanis.) We established Pupil Study Team procedures and arrangedl 
for special teams to deal with multiple failures. We originated the idea of entering into written contractsi 
for outside placements. Working with the Wilmington ACLD, we developed a joint school and parent project 
which resulted in an exhibit of special services and a demonstration of the Core Evaluation process. Colleg^ 
night was re-introduced at the high school. Finally, we are ctirrently spearheading the development of a 
pilot program in "Career Education Training for Counselors" on a collaborative basis. 

Three areas of pupil personnel services warrant special mention: 

Consulting Psychologist - It is important to note that early professional intervention can forestall the 
deepening of psychological problems or conflicts. During the 197U-75 school year our Consulting Psychologist 
dealt with 120 children, ^1 of them at the high school level. This included 6k family contacts. The 
classifications of the self- referrals were: Behavioral, Truancy, Depression, Personal/social, Academic, 
Severe anxiety, and Suicidal. 



76 



Core Team - The Core Evaluation Team is unique in that the pemanent members consisting of a chairman (who 
is a licensed school psychologist), a Reading specialist and a school nurse have developed a high degree of 
e3q)ertise in the core process and, when needed, in selecting appropriate outside placement far beyond the 
level that could be expected if each school were to invoke its own core teams. The team has already re- 
ceived considerable praise from outside observers with whom they were involved in various ways during the 
year. During the IS'Jk-lS school year, 33U cores were completed. During the months of September and 
October, 1975 > a, total of 5l additional cores were done. This included eight visitations to outside facili- 
ties in various parts of the state to determine the appropriateness of prior placements. 

Special Education - By establishing a new resource room at Wobum Street School, every school in Wilmington 
has access to special education support services as provided under Chapter 766. Wilmington has a total of 
ten special education resource rooms within the schools. 

In conjunction with the SEEM collaborative, Special Education has expended its "self-contained classrooms" 
to include an autistic class, a class for children with severe emotional or behavioral problems and a class 
for pupils with severe learning disabilities. 

READING 

The following items, as they pertain to the Reading Program, might be of interest. 

A. The Fall of 1975 issue of Kaleidoscope , published by the Mass. Department of Education, is devoted to the 
right to read and contains a description of the Wilmington High School Reading Center as one of the pro- 
grams worthy of mention. 

B. A pamphlet. Title I^ in Wilmington ; A Preventative Reading Program , has been disseminated to the USOE 
and every community throughout Massachusetts by the Mass. State Department of Education. 

C. The March 1975 issue of Elementary English contains an article, "Choosing Activities That Teach" which 
is based on a chapter of the Wilmington K-3 Curriculum Guide. 

D. A Reading Materials Fair (K-6) in May 1975 was sponsored by an in-service committee of teachers in grades 
four throu^ six and members of the Reading Department. Teachers and Volunteer Reading Tutors had a 
chance to exhibit, view, and discuss teacher-made and commercial materials available in the system. 
Written suggestions for use accompanied each display. The fair was attended by teachers, parents, and 
students from Lowell University. 

E. The Volunteer Reading Tutor Program , in which members of the conmrunity after twenty hours of training 
from the Reading Department are placed in the schools as Reading Tutors for children in grades one 
throu^ three, as expanded to include each elementary school district. Mrs. Irene Beaton is the 
community coordinator for 1975-1976. 

P. Grade 1^ reading test scores from 1973-1975 have risen from the 58 %ile to the 79 %ile in vocabulary 
and the 1^2 %ile to the 73 %ile in comprehension. The number of grade 1 children falling below the 50 
%ile in both areas has been cut in half. Grade 2 test scores from 197U-1975 have increased from the 
66 °/oLle in vocabulary to the 73 %ile and from the 50 %ile to the 62 %ile in comprehension. 

Even thou^ the Reading Department has concentrated its efforts in the primary grades on a preventative 
reading program, to\m-wide reading scores at Grade four and Grade six are holding and showing some 
improvement. In October 1972, Grade four reading scores were at the 58 %ile in vocabxilary and at the 
1+8 %ile in comprehension. In May 1975 » Grade four reading test scores were at the 60 %ile in vocabixlary 
and at the I4.9 %ile in comprehension. In May 1975 > Grade six reading scores were at the 58 %ile in vo- 
cabulary and 55 %ile in comprehension. In May 197U» Grade five children were tested and not Grade six. 
The Grade five children scored at the 56 %ile in vocabulary and the k9 %ile in comprehension. This 
means that the children who were sixth graders in May 1975 made better than a year' s progress in reading 
in a year's time. 



77 



SCIENCE 



The Science Program in Wilmington this year has continued to expand on the elementary level with the 
addition of the SCIS (Science Ciarriculum Improvement Study) in several of our First and Second Grade 
classes. This along with our new SCIS Kindergarten program called "Beginnings" gives us an adoption of 
this process-approach science program in Grades K-6. 

We have written a "Metric System" Curriculum and are continuously updating that program. 

At the High School level the newly developed course in Clinical Practice and Medical Microhiology continues 
to be most popular. Visits to hospital laboratories have been taken, and the content and approach of the 
Clinical Practices course has been acclaimed by the heads of the laboratories at such hospitals as Massa- 
chusetts General, Deaconness, and Winchester. 

Ovoc ever popular "Chemistry Magic Show" which has proven itself to be so successf\il is now "on the road" 
for one performance a year. A visit to a Lowell elementary school proved a most successful venture both 
for the elementary students there and for our performers as well. We are presently planning another such 
visit this year. 

The High School laboratories are being somewhat expanded this year by the addition of laboratory service 
island in two of out classrooms. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Class of 1975 was awarded close to $90,000 in scholarships. Of this total, nearly $1^,000 worth of 
scholarships was raised locally and awarded to forty-six students. 



CLASS OF 1975 



Percent 


to four year colleges and imiversities 


38.8 


120 


Percent 


to two year colleges 


IU.8 


U6 


Percent 


to nursing schools 


.3 


1 


Percent 


to other post high school education 


3.2 


10 


Percent 


to further education 


(^7.1) 




Percent 


to working forces 


25.7 


80 


Percent 


to military service 


l.h 


h 


Percent 


to marriage 


1.0 


3 


Percent 


that failed to respond to Senior Survey 


11+.8 


i+6 


Totals 


100.0% 


310 



Listed below are the colleges, imiversities, technical schools, and nursing schools to which our 1975 
gradiiates have indicated their intention to attend in the fall: 



Less than Four Year Colleges : 

Art Institute of Boston 

Berwick Academy 

Bridgton Academy 

Bunker Hill Community College 

Burdett School 

Essex Agricultural & Technical School 
Fisher Jimior College 
F3?anklin Institute 
Johnson & Wales College 



Katharine Gibbs School 

Maiden Hospital School of Nursing 

Middlesex Commtmity College 

New England Aeronautical Institute 

New Hampton School 

Newbury Jxmior College 

Northern Essex Community College 

North Shore Community College 

School of Fashion Design 

Solari Hairdressing Academy 



78 



Four Year Colleges and Universities ; 



Antioch College 

American International College 

Bates College 

Bennington College 

Bentley College 

Berklee College of Music 

Boston College 

Boston University 

Bowdoin College 

Bringham Young University 

Butler University 

Colty College 

College of Holy Cross 

Goddard College 

Gordon College 

Hamilton College 

Keen State College (N. H.) 

Merrimack College 

New England College 

New Hampshire College 

Northeastern University 

Norwich University 

Notre Dame University 

Plymouth State College (N. H. ) 

Providence College 

Randalph-Macon College 

Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute 

St. Anselm's College 



St. Francis College 

Simmons College 

Skidmore College 

Southeastern Mass. University 

Southern Utah College 

State College of Boston 

State College at Bridgewater 

State College at Fitchburg 

State College at Framin^am 

State College at North Adams 

State College at Salem 

State College at Westfield 

Stevens Institute of Technology 

Suffolk University 

Texas Christian University 

Tufts University 

University of Colorado 

University of Connecticut 

University of Lowell 

University of Massachusetts TBoston) 

University of Massachusetts (Amherst) 

University of New Hampshire 

University of Rhode Island 

University of Rochester (N. Y.) 

University of Vennont 

Wentworth Institute 

Westminster College 

Worcester State College 



In conclusion, I would like to extend my appreciation to our School Committe, Administrators, teachers, 
ppirents, and students who contrihuted their efforts on behalf of our school system during 1975. 




New traffic ligtits at tfie Sfiawsheen Elementary Sctiool 
79 



/ 



Shawsheen Valley Tech 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Regular meetings of the Regional School Conimittee were held the second and foiirth Tuesday of each month. 
Numerous additional special meetings were called "by the Chairman as the need arose during this extremely 
active year. The time and place of all meetings are duly posted by the District Town Clerks at least fortj 
eight hours in advaince. Unless otherwise noted, the meetings are held at the school facility located at 
100 Cook Street, Billerica. These meetings are open to the public and residents of the District are en- 
co\iraged to attend. 

The elected representatives of the School Committee are: 

BEDFORD BILLERICA BURLINGTON TEWKSEURY WIIMNGTON 



Charles Freni Kenneth L. Buffum Wallace B. Haigh Wilson E. Brazile Eugene L. Kritter 

Joseph Rogers Paul Heffeman John G. Miirphy Richard E. Griffin Frank McLean 

On April 8, 1975 an organizational meeting was held. John G. Murphy, who represents Burlington, was electe 
Chairman for a one year term. Wilmington's representative Eugene L. Kritter was elected Vice Chairman and 
Billerica' s representative Kenneth L. Buffum was appointed by the School Board to the position of Secretary 
Treasurer. 

The highlight of the year was the completion of the new addition to the school. The project, which we 
referred to as Phase II, was completed in time for us to accept in September an additional 565 students to 
our regular day program and the afternoon Occupational Skill Program. In two years time the facility will i 
be providing over 1,800 of the District's students with saleable skills. At that time Shawsheen Tech will i 
be providing occupational education for close to 18% of the Districts grade 9-12 student population. 

Dedication of the new addition was held on Sunday, November 2. The Committee had previously voted to 
dedicate the Phase II facility to a former employee, Joseph E. Bastable, a Tewksbuiy resident. Mr. Bastabl 
a longtime educator and former Superintendent of Schools in Tewksbirty, came to Shawsheen Tech in I969 SLnd | 
served as Gtiidance Director. He was appointed by the Committee in 1971 to the position of Phase II Coordin' 
or and was given the responsibility for planning the $5 "5 Million expansion including cTirrictilum and progra 
that will benefit the students of Bedford, Billerica, Burlin^on, Wilmington and Tewksbury. 

Because of the great number of new programs and activities which Shawsheen Tech could provide the District 
it serves and because the acceptance or rejection of these programs is the responsibility of the policy 
making School Committee, I appointed numerous subcommittees to perform an indepth study of their persepecti 
areas of responsibility. These subcommittees are comprised of members of the regular Shawsheen Tech School 
Committee. I feel strongly that prior to voting a policy the decision making process of Shawsheen Tech's 
School Board must include a careful and complete analysis of each proposal presented to the Board by the 
Admministrative staff. The future success of Shawsheen Tech mandates the initiation by the Board of polici 
which are made based upon sound judgment. 

Thro'u^out the year I have encouraged the members to attend numerous workshops and seminars which are offer 
by the National School Board Association and the Massachusetts Association of School Committees. Sound 
judgment in the policy making process will be ensured if the elected representative is fully aware prior to 
making a decision, of the majiy aspects and alternatives of the subject under discussion. On behalf of the 
students at Shawsheen and residents of the District I wish to commend the members of the District Committee 
who faithfiilly served, contributed and spent much of their personal time on the following subcommittees: 



80 



SUBCOMMITTEE 



CHA.IBMAN 



Athletics 

Phase II Building 

House Building 

Parent-School-Student Interfacing 
Employee Negotiating 
Technical Advisory- 
Regional Chirriculum Coordination 
Personnel 



Charles Preni, Bedford 
Eugene Kritter, Wilmington 
Wallace B. Haig^i, Burlington 
Kenneth Buffum, Billerica 
Richard E. Griffin, Tewksbury 
Prank McLean, Wilmington 
Wallace B. Haigh, Burlington 
Joseph Rogers, Bedford 



On "behalf of the Committee I thank the elected and appointed officials of the District along with the 
residents who supported us in the expansion of our facility. We pledge to continue our efforts to provide 
occupational education to all those students in the District who desire it. 



The year 1975 was a most important time in the history of Shawsheen Tech. We witnessed the completion of 
the addition to our facilities making it possible to double the number of programs as well as to enroll 
many more students desirous of acquiring a vocational skill. 

Building Addition — Phase II 

The building of the addition was very close to schedule due to a number of factors. We found the contractor 
to be extremely cooperative, there were no strikes, the Clerk of the Works did an excellent job. The 
School Committee closely followed the progress and was primarily responsible for the project finishing on 
time. As a result, part of the school was completed two months before the due date, making it possible to 
operate our summer program as usual. A Task Porce made up of three teaching staff members was responsible 
for developing the details of equipment and programs. They also contributed in large measure to the fact 
that the equipment, desks, chairs and other furniture were delivered on time so that oux operation was not 
impeded. The only delay was the opening of the swimming pool. Even here, the pool became an integral part 
of our physical education program starting in November. 

Development of Cluster Concept in Exploratory 

The entering class of 38O new ninth grade students was given opportunities to try out various skill pro- 
grams to determine the ones in which they were most interested and to make it possible to evaluate the 
potential skill of these students. Since it wo\ild be impossible for students to try out all twenty- four 
skill programs, a schedule was developed whereby the students take exploratory training in apporximately 
eight different shops or labs with a resultant choice made at the end of the year. This selection would 
be the area of skill training for grades 10, 11 and 12. 

School Activities 

The school participated in the Industrial Exposition which was held in the Lowell Auditorium, May II4. and l^. 

The Pifth Ann-ual Open House was held at Shawsheen on Thursday evening, April 10. We foimd this was extremely 
well attended and the public has been most enthusiastic in supporting vocational education programs. 

Shawsheen participated with Greater Lawrence and Nashoba Regional in a project that was conducted by the 
Merrimack Education Center involving alternatives for students in Career Occupational Education. 

Food and Garden Festival took place May 5-10 at the Burlington Mall. Our students had exhibits of chicken 
boning, making apple pies, soil testing and construction of a garden house. 

The annual Regional Art Festival was conducted in our gymnasiim. May 8-10 mder the direction of Richard 
Murdock of our Technical Illustrating Department. 



DIRECTOR 



81 



student Activities 



The house "biiilding project was completed in May of this year consisting of the building of a split entrance<| 
house on Fox Hill Road, Burlington. In accordance with a contract drawn up with the Murray Company, a sum 
of $2,500 was allocated to a student fund. This was hased on student labor. This fall the students start- 
ed on their third house building project. The new arrangement was to have a lottery of qualified persons 
with the condition that a sum of money would be contributed to a student fund in lieu of labor. The house 
is presently being built in the Pinehurst section of Billerica. 



Student Enrollment 

The enrollment figures as of October 1, 1975 were as follows: 



Town 


9th 


lOth 


11th 


12th 


Total 


Bedford 


28 


25 


17 


11 


81 


Billerica 


129 


108 


77 


71 


385 


Burlington 


61 


56 


31* 


32 


183 


Tewksbury 


93 


96 


71 


U2 


302 


Wilmington 


68 


Jl 


Jik 


_22 


206 




379 


350 


2k3 


185 


1,157 



Athletics 



In view of the fact that our enrollment will be expanded to over 1,500 students, the athletic activities 
have also been increased, particularly in various sports to include females. 

Public Relations 



In keeping with our efforts to make it possible for teachers in the five towns to be aware of education at 
Shawsheen, we anranged for most of the faculty of Bedford High School to tour the facility as part of a 
professional day. l| 

A model of the completed Shawsheen Tech complex was created by our Drafting Department and has been exhibita 
at various schools and public libraries. 

We have continued to make our facility available to student companies in Junior Achievement who operate 
with advisors from Purity Supreme, Billerica and Raytheon, Bedford. 

We were honored by a visit from the Lord Mayor of Bedford, England who was very interested in the operation j 
of our school. 



Occupational Skills Program 

Each year since the school was opened, it was not possible to accommodate all those who applied for admissioj| 
Consequently a supplementary program was instituted whereby additional students could be enrolled. These 
students, in this arrangement, termed Occupational Skills Program (O.S.P.) first went to their local school 
for academic studies and each afternoon were bussed to Shawsheen Tech for a skill training program from 
2:30-5:30 p.m. each day. From those beginnings, eighty students in ten shops, the program grew year to year 
and eventually expanded to all grade levels with an overall student enrollment of 337 in fifteen different 
areas. In June of 1975 » Shawsheen graduated its first students from the Occupational Skill Program. Fiftee: 
students received a vocational certificate along with a high school diploma from their sending school. Of 
the remaining 65 students who started four years earlier the majority transferred into Shawsheen' s regular 
day program when the opportunity arose. 



82 



Graduation 



As of June 1975 » l59 students graduated. The following report gives a final summation concerning the 
placement of the seniors: 

Seniors in graduating class 1^9 

Seniors employed in own field 100 62.89% 

Seniors going on to higher education 23 li|. i|6% 

Seniors entering the armed services 7 U.i;0% 

Seniors employed in other fields 2l| 15.09% 

Seniors in process of securing employment 5 3«l5% 

99.99 = 100% 



Adult Education 



This year saw even more interest in various programs offered in the adult evening classes which were held 
four nights per week as well as on Saturday and served approximately l,28l adults in fifty- two programs. 
Adult Education Opportunities ExhiMt was held at the Burlington Mall, October 1-3. 



Advisory CoTnmittees 

In accordance with Chapter 7^1 of the General Laws, we have held meetings of Technical Advisory Committees 
twice each year. This is an essential part of our operation since these representatives from industry 
have an opportunity to review oior procedures and make recommendations for changes or additons in keeping 
with up-to-date industrial practices. 



Legislative Acts 

Two recent legislative acts affect our school. We responded in accordance with Chapter 622 making it 
possible for female students to have the same opportTonities as male students and Chapter 766 making pro- 
visions for students with special needs. 



Not withstanding the effects of inflation and higher taxes, it has been a sense of satisfaction to appreci- 
ate the support of the residents of the five towns for vocational education. It is also heartening to 
stimulate the interest of the many students who applied for Shawsheen and to see it as a stepping stone for 
a successfiil career. 



The following is a list of the programs here at Shawsheen Tech: 
EXISTING NEW 



Automobile 
Auto Body 
Carpentry 

Chemical Laboratory 
Culinary Arts 
Electrical 
Electronics 
Machine Shop 
Metal Fabrication 
Physical Education 
Secretarial Science 
Technical Drafting 
Technical Illustration 



Heating and Air Conditioning 
Cosmetology 

Diesels, Heavy Duty Equipment 

Electromechanical Technology 

Graphic Arts 

Small Engines 

Health Services 

Data Processing 

Plumbing 

Photography 

Plant Maintenance 

Masonry 



83 



I 



AREA COORDINATOR 

In conjunction with the Superintendents of Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, Tewkshury, Wilmington, 
Superintendent-Director of Shawsheen Valley Technical High School, and the Shawsheen Valley Regional/Techni-( 
cal High School Committee, the Area Coordinator and liaison members from each community have been develop- 
ing the occupational priorities that have been indentified for the 197?-1976 school year. 

The priorities established included program development and/or revision, special needs students, staff 
development, communication, supportive services, and closer involvement with industry. 

Within the above mentioned priorities, was the theme of occupational competence for the general (non-directed 
and special need students. The Massachusetts State Department of Education has established occupational 
competence as its number one goal. "Occupational Competence is achieved when an individiial is able to 
successfully demonstrate the skills, knowledge, attitudes, and understanding; (l) req^lired for initial job 
placement; and (2) necessaiy to adapt to changing systems." 

The Division of Occupational Education funded $62,997.00 to the Shawsheen Valley Technical High School to 
design, develop, and implement an occupational competence delivery system in collaboration with the partio- ; 
ipating systems within the district. The primary purpose of the project is to develop an exploratory and 
skill development delivery system within the comprehensive school setting. The focus as previously mentionee 
is on the general and special needs students in order to place them at the beginning of a career path with 
an identifiable job entry skill. > 



Other major programs that are under development at this time within the district include the following: 
mPUSTRY/EDUCATION COLLABORATIVE 

In conjunction with the Raytheon Plant in Andover, and Western Electric, the participating systems are 
involved with a partnership that will affect administrators, teachers, and students. The Industry /Educati 
Collaborative is designed to foster a joint relationship in developing a positive force for educational 
change. 



Inservice Training Program for Guidance Counselors 

This pilot program has been in conj\mction with the Wilmington and Billerica school systems 
and focuses on sensitizing Guidance Counselors to the world of work and a process for career 
development for all students. 

Skill Development Program for High School Students 

This pilot program included the Billerica School Department in developing a short term skill 
program within the Raytheon Plant. Other programs that include Bedford, Burlington and 
Tewksbirry are at the development stage include, establishment of a Speaiker Bureau, Annual Hi^ 
School Facility Day, Affirmative Action Guidance, Certification of competence for students from 
comprehensive high schools, Foreman/Teacher Exchange Program. 

COMMONWEALTH COLLOQUIUM 

In conjunction with the Superintendent-Director, the Area Coordinator is attempting to work with the 
Northeast Regional Steering Committee in developing closer ties between the world of business, industry, 
education, and labor for the puirpose of being better able to equip our students for success in the world 
of work. 

We are presently involved with the participating systems in a partnership that includes focusing on an area 
that collectively will include and affect all students. 

With high risk potential dropouts we are developing a process that will mainstream this group of students 
back into the educational process with direction and purpose. 



I 



With disadvantaged students, we are working with a skill training model that will develop saleable skills 
for this group. 

A Placement Office for all students is in the development stage. It is the aim of this program to identify 
what a student ' s needs are and the services and functions necessary for placement heyond grade 12. 

Project Awareness was implemented for the purpose of creating options for students that have left school 
without graduating during the past few years. This program allowed the dropout students to return to 
school and gain the credits needed for graduation. The options allowed admittance in the Summer School 
Program, the Adult Education Program and, if desired, a Career Planning Counseling Program. 

In conclusion, I would like to highlight the collahorative spirit of Shawsheen Valley Technical High School, 
and the participating systems (Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, Tewksbury, and Wilmington), and their positive 
and cooperative attitude that prevails in our attempt in preparing all students for success in the world of 
work and personal life. The above mentioned programs, as well as others, are designed to improve the basis 
for occupational choice, facilitating the acquisition of job skills, and enhancing educational achievement 
in all subject areas, and at all levels by making education more meaningful and relevant. 

I would again like to take this opportunity to indicate that success in developing occupational programs is 
and will be the result of the cooperation between educators from all five systems. 




Officials of tfie Shawsfieen Valley Technical High School 

Standing: (L to R), Wallace B. Haigh, Burlington; Paul J. Heffernan, Billerica; Frank McLean, Wilmington; Joseph Rogers, 
Bedford; Richard E. Griffin, Tewksbury. Sitting: (L to R), John G. Murphy, Burlington (Chairman); Kenneth L. Buffum, 
Billerica (Secretary-Treasurer); Benjamin Wolk, Superintendent-Director. 



85 



Town Meetings 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 1, 1975 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, Saturday, the first of March, A. D. 1975 at 9:45 
o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the 
election of Town offices: 



ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices, to wit: Two 
selectmen for the term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; Two members of the School 
Committee for the term of three years; One member of the Housing Authority for a term of five years; One 
member of the Housing Authority for a term of three years (unexpired term) : 

Question #1 - Beano per Chapter 486, Acts of 1971 

"Shall licenses be granted in this town for the operation, holding, or conducting 
of a game commonly called beano?" Yes 



No 



SUMMARY 

(If a majority of the votes cast in answer to said question is in the affirmative the Town shall 
be taken to have authorized the operation, holding or conducting of a game commonly called Beano 
in accordance with the provisions of sections fifty-two and fifty-three of Chapter one hundred 
and forty- seven of the General Laws.) 

Question #2 - Chapter 32B, Section 8A 

"Shall the town distribute to its insured employees, after deducting the town's total 
administrative cost, the balance of any group insurance dividend which shall be based 
upon the employees' proportionate share of the total premiums paid for all insurance 

coverages?" Yes 

No 



SUMMARY 

(Acceptance of the provisions of this statute will authorize the Town to distribute 
dividends and refunds received, to its insured employees after deducting administrative 
costs and other allowable deductions.) 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet 
in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street in said Town of Wilmington, on Saturday, the 
Eighth day of March A.D. 1975 at 1:30 p.m. then and there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan, 
at 9:45 a.m. as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and upon a motion by Mr. Stanley Webber, it 
was seconded and it was voted to dispense with further reading of said Warrant. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the candidates could examine them 
before the polls were opened. The checkers were prepared with their voting lists and voter identification 
cards and everything was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. 



The polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. by the Moderator. 



86 



I 



At 8:00 p.m. the polls were declared closed and the printer packs were removed from the back of the voting 
machines and one copy was given to the tally clerks and the other was posted outside the railing so that 
each candidate could add up his own totals at once. There were (31) absentee ballots cast which were added 
to the machine totals. 



The Town Clerk read the results of this election at 9:30 p.m. 



All the totals from the twenty-five voting machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration 
thereof made, as by law is directed, and were for the following: 

SELECTMEN - Three years (Vote for not more than two) 



Elected A. Daniel Gillis, Randolph Road 1833 

Elected Aldo A. Caira, 188 Chestnut Street 1648 

Pauline Leiter Cola, 27 Salem Street 209 

Madelyn A. McKie, 318 Wobum Street 1496 

Blanks 680 

5866 

MODERATOR - One Year (Vote for one) 

Elected John M. Callan, 571 Wobum Street 2024 

Blanks 909 



2933 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years (Vote for not more than two) 



David J. Dingle, 21 West Street 357 

Albert D. Flight, 27 Grace Drive 982 

Linda T. McMenimen, 14 Grace Drive 1057 

Elected Francis A. Ottati, 40 Hathaway Road 1094 

Elected Francis J. Sullivan, 5 Columbia Street 1518 

Blanks 858 

5866 

WILMINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY - Five years (Vote for one) 

Elected Donald R. Garland, 2 Muse Avenue 1114 

John M. Reardon, 34 Nathan Road 674 

Carolyn R. Sullivan, 17 Marion Street 863 

Blanks 382 



2933 



WILMINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY - Three years (unexpired term) (Vote for one) 

Elected George W. Hooper, 12 Allen Park Drive 2048 

Jeanne M. Waugh, 12 Wildwood Street 710 
Blanks 175 

2933 



QUESTION #1 - BEANO (Chapter 486, Acts of 1971) 

"Shall licenses be granted in this town for the operation, holding, or conducting a game 
commonly called beano?" 



Yes 1545 
No 674 
Blanks 714 

2933 



QUESTION #2 (Chapter 32B, Section 8A) 

"Shall the town distribute to its insured employees, after deducting the town's total adminis- 
trative cost, the balance of any group insurance dividend which shall be based upon the employees' 
proportionate share of the total premiums paid for all insurance coverages?" 

Yes 1252 
No 897 
Blanks 784 

2933 



87 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION (continued) 

All the elected officials present were immediately sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the 
Town Clerk. 

There were Two Thousand nine hundred and thirty-three votes cast. (2933) 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk, Wilmington 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 8, 1975 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



Before the meeting was called to order the Moderator announced that we would observe a ceremony by the 
Wilmington Minute Men and the Girl Scouts. The Minute Men and the Girl Scouts combined their flag bearing 
ceremony together and the Town Meeting enjoyed a fine Bicentennial program. 

Student Government was observed by a short speech by Michael Barcellos as Student Chairman, Board of Selectmei 
The Moderator announced that the High School Key Club was selling tickets for a spaghetti dinner for the 
Town Meeting supper hour. 

Mr. Paul Lynch, Police Chief, asked the Moderator to read the new law on handguns. Mr. John M. Callan read j 
the law and noted that this law will become effective on April 1, 1975. 

Mrs. Julia Fielding announced the Carter Lecture Fund Program which would take place at the Barrows Auditoriunl 
on Thursday, April 17, 1975. i 

Mr. Callan called the Annual Town Meeting to order at 1:55 p.m. there being a quorum present. He asked that 
the Town Clerk note that this meeting was properly posted according to our By-Laws. ^ 

Rev. George B. Taylor, III, Minister of the Wilmington Congregational Church gave the invocation. ^ 

Mr. Callan began the reading of the Warrant and was interrupted by a motion from the Chairman of the Board of ' 
Selectmen, Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that the Moderator dispense with further reading of the warrant and 
take up and make reference to each article by number." So voted. 

ARTICLE 2. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. No reports were offered. | 

ARTICLE 3. Motion by Mr. Aldo A. Caira: "I move that we pass over Article 3 and take no action thereon." So • 
voted. 

Warrant article 3 reads: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, ( 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1975' 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes there-' 
for, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17: or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year be- 
ginning July 1, 1975, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. Finance Committee 
recommended approval. Motion so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the salaries of 
several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation. 



88 



ARTICLE 5. (continued) 

transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr, Thomas E. Casey: "I move that the several and respective sums as recommended by the Finance 
Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and appropriated for the purpose set 
{ forth in Article #5, each item to be taken up separately and voted on, subject to amendment. Motion so voted. 

ACCORDINGLY THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WERE VOTED BY TAXATION OR TRANSFER ; 

liMr. Leverone moved to have the School budget advanced at this time. Moderator asked for a voice vote. Chair 
in doubt. Second voice vote and the Moderator said the motion loses. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries $ 2,500.00 

Expenses 6,250.00 

Capital Outlay 

8,750.00 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries 6,000.00 

Expenses 8,638.00 

14,638.00 

Registrars of Voters 

Salaries 4,550.00 

Expenses 3,400.0 

7,950.00 

Finance Committee 

Salaries 600.00 

Expenses 3.825.00 

4,425.00 

Town Manager 

Salaries - Town Manager 26,533.00 

Other Salaries 23,978.00 

Expenses 1, 150.00 

51,661.00 

Community & Economic Development 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Town Accountant 

Salaries - Town Accountant 15,956.00 

Other Salaries 9,716.00 

i Expenses 550.00 

26,222.00 

Treasurer 

Salaries - Administrative Assistant .. 14,568,00 

Other Salaries 9,181,00 

Expenses 1,825.00 

Tax Title Foreclosures 5,000.00 

30,574.00 

Collector 

Salaries - Collector 12,024.00 

Other Salaries 9,181.00 

Expenses 5,220.00 

26,425.00 

Town Clerk 

Salaries - Town Clerk 12,355.00 

Other Salaries 9,449.00 

Expenses 650.00 

22,454.00 



89 



Board of Assessors 

Salaries - Principal Assessor $ 19,589.00 

Other Salaries 15,424.00 

Expenses 2.922.00 

37,935.00 

Town Counsel 

Salaries (Retainer) 10,000.00 

Expenses (Court Appearances) 7,500.00 

17,500.00 

Town Hall 

Salaries 14,780.00 

Expenses 18,200.00 

Capital Outlay 

32,980.00 

Planning Board 

Salaries 3,000.00 

Expenses 20,250.00 

23,250.00 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 304,764.00 

PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salaries, Chief 25,420.00 

Lieutenant 16,142.00 

Sergeants 79,300.00 

(Amendment by Patrick J. Leonard: "I move to amend the figure of $67,306 as it appears in the 
Finance Committee Recommendations under Police Department - Personal Services; Sergeants, to 



read $79,300. Vote taken by voice and Moderator said motion lost. Seven voters rose to question 
the vote. Standing: Yes-236 No-215 Motion so voted. Mr, George Boylen asked for a secret 
ballot. Motion lost and so declared by the Moderator. Amendment to $79,300 voted. Main motion 



as amended so voted. Yes - 249 No - 225) 

Patrolmen 295,591.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Richard D. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $295,591 be appropriated for 
Police Department, Salaries - Patrolmen; the sum of $295,591 be raised by transfer from Revenue 
Sharing Account, with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Amendment so voted. Main 
motion as amended so voted. Mr. Morris' amendment lost.) 

Traffic Supervisors 38,031.00 

(Motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager: "I move that Traffic Supervisors account under 
Police Department account be amended to read $38,031." So voted, under amendment. 
Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Clerks 15,779.00 

Vacation Pay (Amendment to $45,000 lost) 30,000.00 

Sick Leave Pay 23,000.00 

Miscellaneous Extra Details 28,000.00 

Paid Holidays 16,486.00 

Police Dog 800.00 

Specialist 3,600.00 

Expenses 24,621.00 

Capital Outlay 1,500.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that Capital Outlay under Police Department account be 
amended to read $1,500, provided it is fully reimbursible by the State." (for radar) Amendment 

so voted. Main motion as amended so voted. 

302,679.00 

Constable 

Salaries 100.00 

Fire Department 

Salaries, Chief 25,420.00 

Deputy Chief 16,895.00 



90 



Fire Department (continued) 

Lieutenants $ 55,050.00 

Privates 

(Amendment by Mr. Richard D. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $286,403 be appropriated for 
Fire Department Salaries, Privates; and that the sum of $286,403 be raised by transfer from 
Revenue Sharing Account with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation. Amendment so voted. 
Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Call Fire & Ambulance 14,000.00 

Vacations 31,620.00 

Sick Leave 18,500.00 

Paid Holidays 14,702.00 

Expenses 14,800.00 

Capital Outlay 7.000.00 

197,987.00 

Civil Defense 

Salaries 1,500.00 

Expenses 1,715.00 

(Amendment by Mr, Morris: "I move that the Expenses account under Civil Defense be amended to 

read $1,715. Amendment voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Capital Outlay 500.00 



(Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Capital Outlay account under Civil Defense be amended 



to read $500.00. Amendment voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

3,715,00 

Dog Officer 

Salaries 3,840.00 

Expenses 1,800.00 

Capital Outlay 262.00 

5,902.00 

Building Inspector 

Salaries - Building Inspector 13,885.00 

Other Salaries 8,730.00 

Expenses 2,300.00 

Capital Outlay 240.00 

25,155.00 

Board of Appeals 

Salaries 900.00 

Expenses 260.00 

1,160.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Salaries 1,375.00 

Expenses 50.00 

1,425,00 

TOTAL PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 538,123.00 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Town Engineer 

Salaries - Town Engineer 19,500.00 

Other Salaries 43,000,00 

Expenses 1.100,00 

63,600,00 

Highway Department 

Salaries - Superintendent . 18,133,00 

Other Salaries 187,886,00 

Expenses 96,436.00 

(Amendment under Expenses - Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $137,900 be appropriated for 
Highway Department Expenses, $41,464 to be raised by transfer from Chap. 1140, Acts of 1973 
Account, and the balance of $96,436 to be raised by taxation. Amendment so voted. Main motion 
as amended so voted.) 

Capital Outlay 4,000.00 

Drainage Projects 25,000.00 

Sidewalk Program 50,000,00 

Public Street Lights 100,000,00 



91 




Highway Department (continued) 

Road Machinery - Expenses $ 

Outlay 

Chapter 90 Construction 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 

Salaries 

Expenses 

(Amendment by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $43,232 be appropriated for Chapter 81 
Maintenance; and that the sum of $43,232 be raised by transfer from Chapter 825, Acts of 1974, 
with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation. Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended 
so voted.) 

Snow & Ice Control 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Tree Warden 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Dutch Elm Control 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Gypsy Moth Control 

Salaries 

Expenses. 



Cemetery 

Salaries - Superintendent 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

(Amendment by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $18,300 be appropriated for Cemetery Depart- 
ment Expenses; $3,675 to be raised by transfer from the sale of Cemetery Lots Account and a 
balance of $14,625 to be raised by Taxation. Amendment voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Capital Outlay 

(Mr. Morris amended Capital Outlay by reducing the amount and substituting $2,400. Amendment 
so voted. Main motion as amended so voted. 



39,000.00 I 

37,232.00 \ 
9,000.00 



58,848.00 
78,000.00 
4,600.00 
708,135.00 

20,264.00 
7,100.00 

16,960.00 
2,600.00 

11,874.00 
2.000.00 
60,798.00 

13,182.00 
46,924.00 
14,625.00 



2,400.00 



Parks 

Salaries 

Expenses (Voted to amend to $1,000.00) 

Capital Outlay 

(Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Capital Outlay account under Parks be amended to 
read $2,000.00. Amendment lost.) 



5,000.00 
1,000.00 |i 

I 



83,131.00 1 

'! 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS $ 915,664.00 if 



HEALTH & SANITATION 
Board of Health 

Salaries - Director 

Other Salaries 

(Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Other Salaries account under Board of Health be 
amended to read $36,548." Miss Anne Butters asked the meeting to add $500 to the amount read 
in the amendment to bring the total to $37,048. This was allowed. Total amendment $37,048 
so voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Expenses 

Hospital & Medical Care 

Garbage Collection 

Town Dump 

(Amendment by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $75,000 be appropriated for Town Dump; 
$27,820 to be raised by transfer from the Revenue Sharing Account and the balance of $47,180 



16,510.00 
37,048.00 I. 



2,100.00 
1,500.00 
53,500.00 
47,180.00 



92 



Board of Health (continued) 
to be raised by taxation." Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Drug Dependency Problems $ 13,500.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Drug Dependency Problems account under Board of 
Health be amended to read $13,500." Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended so voted. 

Mental Health Out-Patient 16,000.00 

Lowell Mental Health 2,500.00 

189,838.00 

VETERAN'S AID 

Veteran's Aid & Benefits 

Salaries - P.T. Agent 2,600.00 

Other Salaries 7,290.00 

Expenses 390.00 

Assistance, Veterans 75 ,000.00 

TOTAL VETERAN'S AID 85,280.00 

MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
School Maintenance & Operations 

Salaries - Superintendent 16,160.00 

Salaries - Other 506,533.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Morris to $526,533 lost. Yes-188 No-231) 

Expenses 125,500.00 

Fuel Heating 148.000.00 

Roof Repairs 35,000.00 

Capital Outlay 25,000.00 

School Grounds Maintenance 

Expenses 9,300.00 

Capital Outlay 8,000.00 

Town Building Maintenance 

Expenses 71,000.00 

Capital Outlay (Amendment by Mr. Morris, Cap. Outlay to 7,500 lost) 3.000.00 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 947,493.00 

LIBRARY 

Board of Library Trustees 

Salaries - Director 15,692.00 

Salaries, Other 79,535.00 

Expenses 57,342.00 

(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $63,755 be appropriated for the Library 
Expenses Account; $6,413 to be raised by transfer from State Aid to Public Libraries Account 
and the balance of $57,342 to be raised by taxation. Amendment so voted. Main motion as 
amended so voted.) 

Capital Outlay 4,500.00 

TOTAL LIBRARY 157,069.00 

RECREATION 

Salaries - Director 14,990.00 

Other Salaries (Amendment by Paul J. Bova to $74,360 lost.) 68,783.00 

Expenses (Amendment by Francis S. Sferrazza to $33,710 lost.) 31,270.00 

TOTAL RECREATION 115,043.00 



93 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Salaries $ 2,000.00 

Expenses 100.00 

2,100.00 

BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 

Expenses 800.00 

Capital Outlay 200.00 

1,000.00 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Personal Services 1,500.00 

Expenses 2.450.00 

3,950.00 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Personal Services 1,000.00 

Expenses 3.190.00 

4,190.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

(Motion to vote as siiigle items was discussed and a voter asked to table it. Required 2/3 
vote. Standing: Yes - 4 No - 178 Motion lost.) 



Mr. John E. Nealon, School Committee member: "I move that it be and hereby is the determination 
of the School Committee that the sum of $6,431,139 is the amount necessary for the support and 
operation of the public schools in the Town of Wilmington for the 1975-1976 fiscal year, and 
that the budget for 1975-1976 be reduced by the estimated remaining unspent funds in the 
federal accounts under public laws 864 and 874 in the amount of $120,000. Amendment so voted. 
Main motion as amended so voted.) 



Salaries 5,364,628.00 

Non-Salary 1.066.511.00 

6,431,139.00 

Less Federal Funds 120,000.00 

6,311,139.00 

Vocational Training 6,000.00 

Regional Vocational School District 590,417.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Frank H. McLean: "I move to amend the Regional Vocational School District 

budget from the sum of $643,311 to the sum of $590,417; and that the sum of $590,417 be raised 

and appropriated by taxation. Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

TOTAL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 6,907,556.00 

At 5:15 p.m. Mr. Joseph Courtney moved to recess for supper and reconvene at 7:30 p.m. in the 
High School Gymnasium. Motion so voted. 

Mr. Callan called the meeting to order at 7:35 p.m. there being a quortm present at that time. 
COUNCIL ON AGING 

Personal Services 10,000.00 

Expenses 7.400.00 

17,400.00 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 514,013.00 

General Government 

(Amendment by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $103,648 be appropriated for Maturing Debt 
and Interest, General Government, the sum of $103,648 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash 



with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended so 
voted.) 



91+ 



Water $ 

(Amendment by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $146,445 be appropriated for Maturing Debt 
and Interest - Water; $146,445 to be raised by transfer from Water Available Surplus with a 
balance of zero to be raised by taxation. Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended so 
voted. 

Sewer 

(Amendment by Mr, Duggan: "I move that the sxsa of $50,930 be appropriated for Maturing Debt 
and Interest - Sewer; $50,930 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash with a balance of zero 
to be raised by taxation." Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended so voted, ) 

Interest on Anticipation Notes ) 

Authentication Fees & Misc. Debt) 
(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $50,000 be appropriated for Interest: Anticipa- 
tion Notes, Authentication Fees, and Misc. Debt; $48,637 to be raised by transfer from Free 
Cash and $1,363 to be raised by transfer from accrued interest on Sale of Bonds Account and 
a balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended so 
voted.) .... 



TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST. 



514,013.00 



UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance & Bonds 

(Amendment by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sxmi of $108,695 be appropriated for Insurance and 
Bonds: $108,695 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash with a balance of zero to be raised 
by taxation." Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Reserve Fund 50,000.00 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield & Group Life 

(Amendment by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $100,000 be appropriated for Blue Cross, 
Blue Shield and Group Life; $91,693 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash; $8,307 by transfer 
from the Insurance Dividend Account with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Amendment 
so voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Local Transportation 9,010.00 

Town Report 3,000.00 

Sewer Maintenance. 1,000.00 

Bicentennial Commission 6,950.00 

Appraisals 5,009.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sma of $15,000 be appropriated for Appraisals; 
$9,991 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash and the balance of $5,009 to be raised by 
taxation." Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Training & Conference - In State 8,645.00 

Training & Conference - Out of State 3,000.00 

Veterans' Retirement 16,500.00 

Employee Retirement (Unused Sick Leave) Account 8,000.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the Employees Retirement (Unused Sick 
Leave) account under Unclassified & Reserve be amended to read $8,000." Amendment so voted. 
Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Incentive Pay - Police 7,200.00 

(Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that Incentive Pay - Police account under Unclassified & 
Reserve be amended to read $7,200." Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Incentive Pay - Fire 3,200.00 

(Amendment by Mr. John Brown, Jr. : "I move to amend the amount under Unclassified and 
Reserve for Incentive pay - Fire from the sum of $3,000 to the amount of $3,200," Amendment 
so voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

1976 Salary Adjustment & Additional Costs 200,000.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that 1976 Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs under 
Unclassified & Reserve be amended to read $230,000." Amendment lost. 

Amendment by Mr. John Graney: "I would like to amend the line item 1976 Salary Adjustments 
and Additional Costs from $200,000 to $150,000. Amendment lost. 

Finance Committee's amendment to $200,000 voted. Main motion as amended so voted. 

Additional Employees by Department 4,000.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Miceli: "I move that Additional Employees by Department - Police account under 
Unclassified & Reserve be amended to read $4,000." Amendment so voted. Main motion as amended 
so voted. 



TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE $ 325,514.00 



95 



Finished work on the budget at 9:00 p.m. 

Mr. Joseph Courtney moved that we reconsider Article 5 with the hope that it would be lost. Reconsideration 
vote on Article 5 was put before the meeting and it failed and so declared by the Moderator. 

Total budget by Taxation $11,028,997.00 
Total budget by Transfers 1,274,307.00 

ARTICLE 6. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purchase of the several following items of capital expenditure and further to 
authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of the several items listed below, and for the use of the several de- 
partments so designated: 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate designated sums for the 
purchase of the several items of capital expenditures and to authorize the sale or turn-in of the several 
items so designated, each item to be voted separately." So voted. 

a. Police Department 

To purchase five Police vehicles. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $23,500 
for the purchase of five Police vehicles, and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or 
turn-in of five vehicles presently used by the Police Department." So voted. (The Finance Committee re- 
ported approval of $23,500 by taxation.) 

b. Fire Department 

To purchase a 1000 G.P.M. Pumper. 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr. "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $65,000 for the purchase of a 1000 G.P.M. Pumper for the use of the Fire Department." The Finance 
Committee reported approval of $65,000 by taxation. Motion so voted. 

c. Fire Department 

To purchase a Chief's car. 

Mr. Morris moved to pass over this Article 6c and take no action thereon. So voted. 

d. Engineering Department 
To purchase a van. 

Mr. Morris moved to pass over this article and take no action thereon. So voted. 

e. Highway Department 

1. To purchase two 5 to 7 yard dump trucks. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $14,600 
for the purchase of a 5 to 7 yard dump truck for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion 
of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a 7 yard dump truck presently used by the Highway 
Department." Finance Committee reported approval of $14,600 by taxation. Motion so voted. 

2. To purchase a truck chassis and cab only. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $10,000 
for the purchase of a truck, chassis and cab for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion 
of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a chassis and cab presently used by the Highway 
Department." Finance Committee reported approval of $10,000 by taxation. Motion so voted. 



3. 


To 


purchase 


a 


3/4 ton Pickup Truck. Voted to pass over this article and take no action thereon. 


4. 


To 


purchase 


a 


Bobcat Tractor. 


Voted to pass over this article and 


take no action thereon. 


5. 


To 


purchase 


a 


Stone Spreader. 


Voted to pass over this article and 


take no action thereon. 


6. 


To 


purchase 


a 


Street Sweeper. 


Voted to pass over this article and 


take no action thereon. 


7. 


To 


purchase 


a 


Bobcat Snow Blower. Voted to pass over this article 


and take no action thereon. 


8. 


To 


purchase 


a 


Sander body. Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the 


Town vote to raise by taxation 



96 



ARTICLE 6. (continued) 

and appropriate the sum of $2,500 for the purchase of a Sander Body for the use of the Highway 
Department." The Finance Committee reported approval of $2,500. Motion so voted. 



f . Tree Department 

1. To purchase a 3/4 ton four wheel drive Pickup Truck. Voted to pass over this article and take no 
action thereon. 

2. To purchase a bucket hoist and chassis with complete hydraulic systems. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$25,000 for the purchase of a bucket hoist and chassis with complete hydraulic systems for the 
use of the Tree Department." The Finance Committee reported approval of $25,000. Motion so 
voted. 

g. Public Buildings Department 

1. To purchase a Power Sweeper. Voted to pass over this article and take no action thereon, 

2. To purchase a van truck. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sxim of 
$6,500 for the purchase of a van truck, and at the discretion of the Town Manager, authorize the sale 
or turn-in of a 3/4 ton pickup truck." The Finance Committee reported disapproval. Motion lost. 

3. To purchase a Tractor with backhoe. Voted to pass over this article and take no action thereon. 

4. To install floodlights at the Boutwell School tennis courts. Voted to pass over this article and 
take no action thereon. 

5. To install floodlights at the Wobum Street School tennis courts. Voted to pass over this article 
and take no action thereon. 

6. To install floodlights at the Glen Road School tennis courts. Voted to pass over this article and 
take no action thereon. 

7. To install floodlights at the Wildwood Street School tennis courts. Voted to pass over this article 
and take no action thereon. 

8. To enclose a carport at the Police Station for office space. Voted to pass over this article and 
take no action thereon. 

9. To restore and renovate Hamden Tavern, Voted to pass over this article and take no action thereon, 

,h, Beautif ication Committee 

To construct a Gazebo at Rotary Park. Voted to pass over this article and take no action thereon, Mr, 
Gillis asked reconsideration of this article. Motion lost, 

i. Council on Aging 

To purchase a 15-passenger Station Wagon or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Edwin G. Nash: "I move to raise and appropriate by taxation the sum of $6,528 for a 15- 
passenger station wagon for the Council on Aging." Finance Committee reported disapproval. Motion so 
voted. 

lARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $300,000 or any other sum for the purpose 
of developing a sanitary land fill area on land owned by the Town for solid waste disposal, including 
engineering, surveying, architectural and planning costs, site development, construction of access roads, 
water and power lines in connection therewith, and the construction of buildings, structures or facilities 
and the acquisition of equipment in connection therewith, to determine whether said appropriation shall be 
raised by borrowing or otherwise and to petition the General Court for the passage of any special law neces- 
^jsary to validate any vote passed under this article, or take any other action with respect to the foregoing. 

totion by Mr. George W, Boylen, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $300,000 for the 
purpose of developing a sanitary landfill area on land owned by the Town for solid waste disposal, including 
1 1 engineering surveying, architectural and planning costs, site development, construction of access roads. 



97 



ARTICLE 7. (continued) 

water and power lines in connection therewith, and the construction of buildings, structures or facilities 
and the acquisition of equipment in connection therewith, and to meet said appropriation that the Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of $300,000 at one time or from 
time to time and issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, each issue of such bonds or notes to be payable 
in not more than twenty (20) years from its date, and that the Town hereby petitions the General Court for 
the passage of a special law to authorize and validate the provisions of this vote." The Finance Committee 
reported approval of $300,000 by bond issue. 

The Board of Selectmen from the Town of Burlington sent a letter to the Town Moderator asking that this 
letter be filed showing their opposition to this proposal. Town meeting advised of contents and the Town 
Clerk given letter for filing purposes. 

A petition from the residents and taxpayers of the City of Wobum was also filed registering their disapprove* 
of this dump site, 

A great deal of discussion followed and then came a motion to move the previous question. Standing vote to 
cut off further debate: Yes - 298 No - 19 So voted. 

Mr, Donald White of the Solid Waste Committee was allowed to complete his presentation. 
Standing vote taken: Yes - 145 No - 175 Motion fails for want of a 2/3 vote. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appropri- 
ate a sum of money for the purpose of operating the Town sanitary landfill for the disposal of solid waste 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. George Boylen, Jr. to pass over Article 8 and take no action thereon. So voted, 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000 for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have charge 
of said observances, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$1,500 for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who 
shall arrange and have charge of said observances." The Finance Committee reported approval of $1,500 by 
taxation. Amendment by Mr, F. T. Carrasco: "I move to amend the motion and ask that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $2,000 for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day and that the Moderator 
appoint a committee who shall arrange and have charge of said observances." Amendment so voted. Main motion 
as amended so voted. 

Reconsideration of Article 7 was asked for and lost, 

ARTICLE 10, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750 each (or a total of 
$1,500) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Nee-Ellsworth Post No, 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 

b, American Legion Clubhouse, Inc, in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Wilmington Post No, 136 of the American Legion,, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr, James F, Banda follows exactly as worded in the article #10 above. Finance Committee recom- 
mended disapproval. The Moderator called for the vote and announced the ayes have it, so voted. 

At 11:15 p,m. Mr. Miceli moved the meeting adjourn to March 15, 1975 in the High School Gymnasium at 1:00 p.m. 
So voted. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 15, 1975 
Mr. John M. Callan, moderator, called the meeting to order at 2:00 p.m., there being a quorum present. 



98 



ARTICLE 11. To authorize the Board of Water Coinmissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest 
together with temporary construction easements either by eminent domain, purchase, gift, or otherwise, in 
land now or formerly of Carl Christiansen necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribution 
system in the northeast sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said land 
being described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the northerly sideline of Andover Street at its intersection with the property 
line between land of Carl Christiansen and land of Hugo and Dorothy Wiberg; thence S45 degrees-02 ' -33" 
W by Andover Street thirty and eighty-eight hundredths (30.88) feet; thence N31 degrees-13 ' -37W one 
hundred ninety-seven and forty-four hundredths (197.44) feet; thence N53 degrees-25 ' -49 ' W fifty-two 
and ninety-two hundredths (52.92) feet; thence N31 degrees-13' -37"W four hundred eighty-three and 
thirty-seven hundreds (483.37) feet to land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; thence N06 degrees- 
36' -55" W by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts sixty-nine and fifteen hundredths (69.15) feet; 
thence N22 degrees-06' -17"E by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts about one hundred two and no 
hundredths (102.00) feet to land of the Insul-Tab Company, Inc.; thence N64 degrees-32'45" E by land of 
the Insul-Tab Company, Inc. about forty-four and forty-six hundredths (44.46) feet; thence S22 degrees- 
06'-17" W about one hundred twenty-seven and thirteen hundredths (127.13) feet; thence S06 degrees- 36'- 
55" E fifty-four and ninety-two hundredths (54.92) feet; thence S31 degrees-13' -37" E four hundred 
seventy and ninety-four hundredths (470.94) feet; thence S53 degrees-25 '49" E fifty-two and ninety-two 
hundredths (52.92) feet to the westerly property comer of land of Hugo and Dorothy Wiberg, thence 
S31 degrees-13' 37" E by land of Hugo and Dorothy Wiberg; one hundred ninety-six and no hundredths 
(196.00) feet to the point of beginning and containing about 27,099 square feet of land as shown on 
a Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass. by Whitman & Howard Inc., Engineers and Architects and dated 
November 26, 1974; 

and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the payment of any damages which may incur, or do anything in relation 
thereto, (Request of the Board of Water Commissioners) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of $400.00. Motion by Mr. Vincent R. McLain: "I move that the Town 
vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest, together 
with temporary construction easements, either by eminent domain, purchase, gift or otherwise, in land now or 
formerly of Carl Christiansen and/or Rudolph Krey, necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribu- 
tion system in the northeast sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said 
land being described as follows: (see Article which follows the motion exactly) and that the funds required 
be appropriated from funds available in Account #1168, entitled Water Distribution System in the Northeast 
Sector of Town for the payment of any expenses and damages which may be incurred," After much discussion a 
motion to postpone lost. Main motion: Yes - 112 No - 50 So voted, 

ARTICLE 12, To authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest 
together \^rLth temporary construction easements either by eminent domain, purchase, gift or otherwise, in land 
of the Insul-Tab Company Inc. necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribution system in the 
northeast sector of the Town, as voted in the Annual Town Meeting. 

Beginning at a point on the property line between land of Carl Christiansen and land of the Insul-Tab 
Company, Inc., at its intersection with the easterly line of land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
thence N22 degrees-06' -17"E by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts one hundred seventy-one and 
thirty-eight hundredths (171.38) feet to a granite bound; thence by land of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts on a curve to the left the radius of which is 680.00 feet about five hundred twenty and 
ninety-four hundredths (520.94) feet to land of Robert Corey; thence S56 degrees-42' -05"E by land of 
Robert Corey about fifty and thirty-two hundredths (50.32) feet; thence by a curve to the right the 
radius of which is 710,00 feet about five hundred two and sixty-four hundredths (502.64) feet; thence 
S22 degrees-06' -17"W about one hundred thirty-eight and fifty-seven hundredths (138.57) feet to land 
of Carl Christiansen; thence S64 degrees-32' -45"W by land of Carl Christiansen about forty-four and 
forty-six hundredths (44.46) feet to the point of beginning and containing about 19,996 square feet 
of land as shown on a Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass, by Whitman & Howard Inc,, Engineers and 
Architects and dated November 26, 1974; 
and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise, for the payment of any damages which may incur, or do anything in relation 
thereto, (Request of the Board of Water Commissioners) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of $600,00 no effect on tax rate. Motion by Mr, Vincent R, McLain: 
"I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or 
other interest, together with temporary construction easements, either by eminent domain, purchase, gift or 
otherwise, in land of the Insul-Tab Co., Inc. necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribution 
system in the northeast sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said land 



99 



ARTICLE 12. (continued) 

being described as outlined in the warrant article #12 and that the funds required be appropriated from funds 
available in account #1168, entitled Water Distribution System in the Northeast Sector of Town for the pay- 
ment of any expenses and damages which may be incurred." Standing vote: Yes - 117 No - 47 Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 13. To authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest 
together with temporary construction easements either by eminent domain, purchase, gift or otherwise, in 
land of Robert Corey necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribution system in the northeast 
sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said land being: 

Beginning at a point on the property line between land of the Insul-Tab Company, Inc., and land of 
Robert Corey at its intersection with the easterly line of land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
thence by a curve to the left the radius of which is 680.00 feet about one hundred eighty and 
thirty hundredths (180.30) feet to other land of Robert Corey; thence S56 degrees-42 ' -05" E by other 
land of Robert Corey about seventy-seven and seventy-one hundredths (77.71) feet; thence by a curve 
to the right the radius of which is 710.00 feet about one hundred fifty-six and twenty-six hundredths 
(156.26) feet to land of the Insul-Tab Company, Inc.; thence N56 degrees-42 ' 05 '' W by land of the 
Insul-Tab Company, Inc. about fifty and thirty-two hundredths (50.32) feet to the point of beginning 
and containing about 5,013 square feet of land as shown on a Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass, by 
Whitman & Howard, Inc., Engineers and Architects and dated November 26, 1974. 
and determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise, for the payment of any damages which may incur, or do anything in rela- 
tion thereto. (Request of the Board of Water Commissioners) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of $300.00. Action under Article 13; Mr. McLain: "I move that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest, 
together with temporary construction easements, either by eminent domain, purchase, gift or otherwise, in 
land of Robert Corey necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribution system in the northeast 
sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said land being described as 
follows: (see words in article - motion follows exactly) and that the funds required be appropriated from 
funds available in Account #1168, entitled Water Distribution System in the Northeast Sector of Town, for 
the payment of any expenses and damages which may be incurred. Standing vote: Yes - 102 No - 66 Motion 
lost for want of a 2/3 vote. Motion to reconsider this vote lost. 

ARTICLE 14. To authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest 
together with temporary construction easements either by eminent domain, purchase, gift, or otherwise, in 
land of Robert Corey necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribution system in the northeast 
sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said land being described as 
follows : 

Beginning at a point on the northeasterly line of land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts at its 
intersection with the line between lands of Robert Corey; thence by a curve to the left the radius 
of which is 680.00 feet about one hundred eleven and no hundredths (111.00) feet to other land of 
Robert Corey; thence northerly by other land of Robert Corey about thirty-three and thirty-six 
hundredths (33.36) feet; thence by a curve to the right the radius of which is 710.00 feet about 
two hundred four and nine hundredths (204.09) feet; thence N 56 degrees-42 ' -05" W by other land of 
Robert Corey about seventy-seven and seventy-one hundredths (77.71) feet to the point of beginning 
and containing about 4,772 square feet of land as shown on a Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass. by 
Whitman & Howard, Inc., Engineers and Architects and dated November 26, 1974. 
and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the payment of any damages which may incur, or do anything in relation 
thereto. (Request of the Board of Water Commmissioners) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of $300.00. Motion by Mr. Arnold Blake to pass over articles 14 
through 20 and take no action thereon. After some discussion motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 15. To authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest 
together with temporary construction easements either by eminent domain, purchase, gift, or otherwise, in 
land of Robert Corey necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribution system in the northeast 
sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said land being described as 
follows : 

Beginning at a point on the easterly sideline of Route 125, 48.00 feet northerly, on a curve to right, 
from a concrete bound at a ramp to Route 93, thence by the same curve to the right the radius of 
which is 1,534 feet, forty-three and eighty-seven hundredths (43.87) feet; thence S18 degrees-25 ' -53" E 
one hundred eighty-nine and eighty four hundredths (189.84) feet; thence S62 degrees-25 ' 39" E one 



100 



ARTICLE 15. (continued) 

hundred seventy-six and eighty-eight hundredths (176.88) feet; thence by a curve to the right the 
radius of which is 710.00 feet about one hundred eighty-four and fifty-two hundredths (184.52) 
feet to other land of Robert Corey; thence southerly by other land of Robert Corey about thirty- 
three and thirty-six hundredths (33.36) feet to land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; thence 
by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts on a curve to the left the radius of which is 680.00 
feet about one hundred ninety-one and no hundredths (191.00) feet; thence N62 degrees-25 ' -39" W 
by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts one hundred eighty-nine and no hundredths (189.00) 
feet; thence Nl8 degrees-25 ' -53" W one hundred sixty-nine and ninety-four hundredths (169.94) 
feet to the point of beginning and containing about 16,521 square feet of land as shown on a 
Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass. by Whitman & Howard, Inc., Engineers and Architects and dated 
November 26, 1974. 

and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the payment of any damages which may incur, or do anything in relation 
thereto. (Request of the Board of Water Commissioners) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of $500.00. Standing vote to pass over and take no action. 
Yes - 85 No - 22 Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 16. To authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest 
together with temporary construction easements either by eminent domain, purchase, gift or otherwise, land 
of P.G.A. Realty Trust necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribution system in the north- 
east sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said land being described as 
follows : 

Beginning at a point on a curve with a radius of 80,00 feet at the northwesterly end of Upton Drive; 
thence N58 degrees-42 ' 01" W by the southwesterly sideline of a proposed roadway three hundred eighteen 
and no hundredths (318,00) feet; thence by the southwesterly sideline of a proposed roadway on a 
curve to the left the radius of which is 530,00 feet, two hundred twenty-five and seventeen 
hundredths (225.17) feet; thence N34 degrees-21 ' -30"W by the westerly sideline of a proposed roadway 
fifty and ninety hundredths (50.90) feet; thence N41 degrees-48 ' -24" E sixty-one and seventy-nine 
hundredths (61,79) feet to the easterly sideline of the proposed roadway; thence S34 degrees-21 ' 30" 
E by the easterly sideline of the proposed roadway sixty-five and sixty-seven hundredths (65.67) 
feet; thence by the northeasterly sideline of the proposed roadway on a curve to the left the radius 
of which is 470.00 feet, one hundred ninety-nine and sixty-eight hundredths (199.68) feet, thence 
S58 degrees-42 ' -01" E by the northeasterly sideline of the proposed roadway three hundred eighteen 
and no hundredths (318,00) feet to the northeasterly end of Upton Drive; thence by the northwesterly 
end of Upton Drive on a curve to the left the radius of which is 80.00 feet, sixty-one and fifty 
hundredths (61.50) feet to the point of beginning and containing 35,085 square feet of land and 
shown as parcel 1 on an Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass. by Whitman & Howard Inc., 
Engineers and Architects and dated January 16, 1975, 
and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise, for the payment of any damages which may incur, or do anything in relation 
thereto, (Request of the Board of Water Commissioners) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of $650,00, Votedto pass over this article and take no action 
thereon. 

ARTICLE 17. To authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest 
together with temporary construction easements either by eminent domain, purchase, gift or otherwise, in 
land of P.G.A, Realty Trust, necessary to effect the improvements to the Water distribution system in the 
northeast sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said land being described 
as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the southwesterly sideline of the proposed roadway at its intersection with 
the southeasterly sideline of the proposed 30 foot Utility Easement; thence S41 degrees-48 '-24" W 
three hundred two and ninety-three hundredths (302,93) feet; thence N66 degrees-55 ' -17"w by land 
of C & R Realty Trust, one hundred twenty-three and two hundredths (123,02) feet; thence N40 de- 
grees-41 '45"W by land of Philip and Dorothy Park, twenty-five and ninety-three hundredths (25.93) 
feet; thence S68 degrees-18 ' 37" E one hundred nineteen and fifty hundredths (119.50) feet; thence 
N41 degrees-48' -24" E three hundred five and thirty-four hundredths (305.34) feet to the south- 
westerly sideline of the proposed roadway; thence S34 degrees-21 ' -30" W by the southwesterly 
sideline of the proposed roadway, thirty and ninety hundredths (30.90) feet to the point of be- 
ginning and containing 10,725 square feet of land and shown as parcel 2 on an Easement Plan of 
Land in Wilmington, Mass. by Whitman & Howard, Inc., Engineers and Architects and dated 1/16/75. 



101 



ARTICLE 17. (continued) 

and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by transfer from available funds, by borrowing 
or otherwise, for the payment of any damages which may incur, or do anything in relation thereto. (Request 
of the Board of Water Commissioners) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of $400,00. Voted to pass over this article and take no action 
thereon. 

ARTICLE 18. To authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest 
together with temporary construction easements either by eminent domain, purchase, gift, or otherwise, in land 
of Philip and Dorothy Park necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribution system in the 
northeast sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said land being described 
as follows: 

Beginning at a point at the property comer between lands of Philip and Dorothy Park, P.G.A. Realty 
Trust, and C & R Realty Trust; thence N70 degrees-36 ' -47" W one hundred twenty-nine and sixty-five 
hundredths (129.65) feet; thence N66 degrees-57 ' -38" W ninety-four and fifty-four hundredths 

(94.54) feet; thence N67 degrees-32 ' 35" W eighty-one and fifteen hundredths (81.15) feet; thence^ 
N78 degrees-41 ' -24" W eighty-one and fifty-eight hundredths (81.58) feet; thence N 84 degrees-11- 
36" W one hundred eighteen and sixty-one hundredths (118.61) feet; thence S 86 degrees-23 ' -10" W 
ninety-five and nineteen hundredths (95,19) feet; thence N82 degrees-43-48" W ninety-one and 
ninety-three hundredths (91.93) feet; thence N73 degrees-08 ' -52" W two hundred thirty and fifty- 
two hundredths (230.52) feet; thence N61 degrees-35 ' -17" W one hundred fifty-eight and thirty- 
seven hundredths (158.37) feet, the previous nine courses being by land of C & R Realty Trust; 
thence S72 degrees-12 ' -44" E four hundred fifty-two and fifty-two hundredths (452.52) feet; thence 
S88 degrees-23' -11" E two hundred seventy-six and five hundredths (276.05) feet; thence S68 
degrees-18 ' -37" E three hundred twenty-seven and eighty-eight hundredths (327.88) feet to land 

of P.G.A. Realty Trust; thence S40 degrees-41 ' -45" E by land of P.G.A. Realty Trust, twenty-five 
and ninety-three hundredths (25.93) feet to the point of beginning and containing 18,413 square 
feet of land and shown as parcel 4 on an Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass. by Whitman & 
Howard, Inc., Engineers and Architects and dated January 16, 1975. 
and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise, for the payment of any damages which may incur, or do anything in relation 
thereto. (Request of the Board of Water Commissioners) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of $550.00. Voted to pass over this article and take no action 
thereon. 

ARTICLE 19. To authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement, or other interest 
together with temporary construction easements either by eminent domain, purchase, gift, or othervise, in 
land of C & R Realty Trust necessary to effect the improvements to the water distribution system in the 
northeast sector of the Town, as voted in the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, said land being described 
as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the easterly sideline of Ballardvale Street at its intersection with the 
property line between land of Philip and Dorothy Park and land of C & R Realty Trust; thence N78 
degrees-10 ' -41" E forty and eighty-four hundredths (40.84) feet; thence N80 degrees-41 ' -41" E 
ninety and sixty-eight hundredths (90.68) feet; thence N71 degrees-53 ' -52" E eighty-six and 
fourteen hundredths (86.14) feet; thence N 81 degrees-15 ' -44"E twenty-seven and seventy-three 
hundredths (27.73) feet; thence N81 degrees-30 ' -35"E one hundred twenty-two and seventy-six 
hundredths (122.76) feet; thence S88 degrees-40 ' -08"E fifty-eight and fifty-five hundredths 

(58.55) feet; thence S75 degrees-58 ' -08" E thirty-five and thirty-nine hundredths (35.39) 
feet; thence S66 degrees-45 ' -56" E sixty-four and eighty-six hundredths (64.86) feet; thence 
S61 degrees-35 ' 17"E one hundred seventy-one and fifty-two hundredths (171.52) feet; thence 
S73 degrees-08' -52" E two hundred thirty and fifty-two hundredths (230.52) feet; thence S82 
degrees-43 ' -48" E ninety-one and ninety-three hundredths (91.93) feet; thence N86 degrees- 
23'-10" E ninety-five and nineteen hundredths (95.19) feet; thence S84 degrees-11-36" E one 
hundred eighteen and sixty-one hundredths (118.61) feet; thence S78 degrees-41 ' 24"E eighty- 
one and fifty-eight hundredths (81.58) feet; thence S67 degrees-32 ' -35" E eighty-one and 
fifteen hundredths (81.15) feet; thence S66 degrees-57 ' -38" E ninety-four and fifty-four 
hundredths (94.54) feet; thence S70 degrees-36 ' -47" E one hundred twenty-nine and sixty- 
five hundredths (129.65) feet, the previous 17 courses being by land of Philip and Dorothy 
Park; thence S66 degrees-55 ' -17" E by land of P.G.A. Realty Trust, one hundred twenty-three 
and two hundredths (123.02) feet; thence S41 degrees-48 ' -24" W fifteen and ninety-eight 
hundredths (15.98) feet; thence N68 degrees-18-37" W four hundred sixty-three and four 



102 



ARTICLE 19. (continued) 

hundredths (463.04) feet; thence N88 degrees-23' -11" W two hundred seventy-five and no hundredths 
(275.00) feet; thence N72 degrees-12 ' -44" W four hundred eighty-five and thirty-two hundredths 
(485.32) feet to other land of C & R Realty Trust; thence N60 degrees-34 ' -40" W fifty-three and 
eight hundredths (53.08) feet; thence N80 degrees-44 ' 20" W seventy four and ninety-two hundredths 
(74.92) feet; thence S77 degrees-05 ' -40" W three hundred sixty-nine and twenty hundredths (369.20) 
to the easterly sideline of Ballardvale Street the previous three courses being by other land of 
C & R Realty Trust; thence NlO degrees-27 ' -40" W by Ballardvale Street, thirty-three and forty 
hundredths (33.40) feet to the point of beginning and containing 31,609 square feet of land and 
shown as parcel 3 on an Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass. by Whitman & Howard, Inc., 
Engineers and Architects and dated January 16, 1975. 
and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or otherwise, for the payment of any damages which may incur, or do anything in relation thereto. 
(Request of the Board of Water Commissioners) 



Finance Committee recommended approval of $800.00. 
thereon. 



Voted to pass over this article and take no action 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to complete the improve- 
ments to the water distribution system in the northeast sector of the Town in compliance with the vote of 
the annual Town Meeting of March 9, 1974, and to determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation 
thereto. (Request of the Board of Water Commissioners) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of $100,000.00 by Bond Issue. Motion by Mr. Arnold C. Blake: "I move 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $200,000.00 to ccmplete the improvements to the water distribu- 
tion system in the northeast sector of the Town in compliance with the vote of the Annual Town Meeting of 
March 9, 1974, and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow a 
sum or sums not to exceed in the aggregate $200,000.00 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause 5 
of the General Laws as amended and supplemented, and issue the bonds or notes of the Town therefor, at one 
time, or from time to time, each issue of such bonds or notes to be payable in not more than 15 years from 
its date." Standing vote taken: Yes-80 No-69 Motion lost for want of a 2/3 vote. 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws, Chapter 5, by adding thereto Section 
36 as follows: 



CHAPTER 5, SECTION 36 - SIGN AND 
ADVERTISING DEVICES 
Definitions 

In addition to the regulations and the requirements 
of the BUILDING CODE of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, signs shall conform to the provisions 
of this section of the Revised By-Law of the Town of 
Wilmington. 

Section 36.1-A For the purposes of this Section, SIGN 
shall include any letter, word, symbol, drawing, pic- 
ture, device, article or object that advertises, calls 
attention to or indicates any premises, person or ac- 
tivity, whatever the nature of material and manner of 
composition or construction. 

1-B. Display Surface is the area of the sign available 
for the advertising message. 

1-C. Sign Structure means the support, uprights, 
braces and framework of the sign. 

1-D. Erect shall include the words attach, build, 
paint, construct, reconstruct, alter, enlarge, and 
move. 

1-E. A Wall Sign means any sign erected against the 
wall of a building or structure, or a sign that is a part 
of the building or structure with the exposed face of 
the sign in a plane parallel to the plane of said wall, 
building or structure and shall not project more than 



one ( 1 ) foot from the side of the structure, or above the 
highest line of the roof or extend beyond a corner of 
the structure. 

1-F. A Free Standing Sign means any sign that is 
supported independently from any building. 

1-G. A Roof Sign means any sign attached to the roof 
surface of a building on which the display surface is 
above the roof level. 

1-H. An Individual Letter Sign means a sign made of 
separate letters. The dimensions of such sign shall be 
the height of the tallest letter and the width of the com- 
bined letters as displayed. 

l-I. A Projecting Sign means any sign other than a 
wall sign extending from and supported by a building 
and shall include signs painted or attached to wirings. 

1-J. A Marquee Sign means any sign attached to a 
roof-like structure or awning which projects over the 
entrance to a building. 

1-K. A Temporary Sign means any sign erected for a 
limited period of time not to exceed 90 days. 

1-L. An Electric Sign means any sign containing 
electric wiring which is illuminated by incandescent 
or fluorescent lamps or luminous tubes or provides a 
beacon or searchlight. 

1-M. A Moving Sign means any sign that is animated 
by mechanical or natural means. 



103 



ARTICLE 21. (continued) 



b. The sign shall be 6 sq. ft. or less. An individual 
letter sign shall be 2 ft. or less in height. 

36.3.B.5 Free Standing Signs 

a. No free standing signs shall be permitted except 
as authorized on Appeal by the Board of Appeals. 

b. A temporary sign erected during construction of a 
building shall be 48 sq. ft. or less and 10 ft. or less in 
any dimension. 

36.3-C. Industrial District 
36.3.C.1. A temporary sign advertising rental, sale 
or lease of the premises not exceeding 24 sq. ft. 

36.3.C.2. Wall Signs 
a. Wall signs shall be the same as for business dis- 
tricts except that signs shall be 6 ft. or less in height. 



36.3.C.3. Roof Signs 
a. One roof sign shall be permitted for each building. 

b. A roof sign shall be 10 ft. or less in height and shall 
not exceed 100 sq. ft. An individual letter roof sign 
shall be six (6) ft. or less in height. 



36.3.C.4. Projecting Signs 
- Same as Sub-Section 3-B. 

36.3.C.5. Marquee Signs 
-Same as Sub-Section 3.B. 

36.3.C.6. Free Standing Signs 



a. No free standing signs shall be permitted except 
as authorized on appeal by the Board of Appeals. 

b. A temporary sign erected during construction of a 
building shall be 48 sq. ft. or less and 10 ft. or less in 
any dimension. 

c. A free standing sign may be permitted for pur- 
poses of a business directory provided that no more 
than 20 sq. ft. shall be permitted for each business. 

Section 36.4 Severability 

The invalidity of any part or provision of Section 36 
shall not invalidate any other Section or provision 
thereof; 



or do anything in relation thereto. (Request of the Planning Board) 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, by deleting in its entirety, Section 
IV-5 and Sections III-lA.9.h, III-l.A.9.i., III-2.A.6.C, III-3.B.5 Signs, and substitute therefor the 
following: 



SECTION IV-5 SIGN AND ADVERTISING DEVICES 
Signs 

For the purposes of this Section, SIGN shall include 
any letter, word, symbol, drawing, picture, design, 
device, article, or object that advertises, calls atten- 
tion to or indicates any premises, person or activity, 
whatever the nature of material and manner of com- 
position or construction. In zoning districts signs are 
permitted as follows: 

A. Residential Districts 



1. A temporary sign advertising rental, lease or sale 
of the premises which shall be 6 sq. ft. or less. 

2. A sign stating the home occupation or profession 
of a resident which shall be 1 sq. ft. or less. 

B. Business Districts 



1. A temporary sign advertising rental, lease or sale 
of the premises which shall be 6 sq. ft. or less. 

2. Wall Signs 

a. One wall sign shall be permitted for each business 
side of a building and direct entrance into a store. 

b. At gasoline stations and garages the front wall 
sign may be divided into separate signs indicating 
operations or departments, provided the total width of 
the separate signs does not exceed the maximum per- 
mitted for a wall sign. 



c. A wall sign shall be four feet or less in height. 

d. At the first floor level a sign may extend across 
the full width of the wall. At other than the first floor 
level, a sign shall be 6 feet or less in length. 

e. One building directory shall be permitted on the 
exterior wall of the building at each entrance. A 
building directory shall be one sq. ft. or less for each 
tenant or occupant of the building. 

f. The total sign area shall not exceed 25% of the 
area of the wall on which it is placed. 

3. Projecting Signs 

a. One sign shall be permitted for each business. 

b. The sign shall be 4 ft. or less in height and shall not 
project more than 6 ft. from the face of the building, 
nor closer than 15 feet from the property line. 

4. Marquee Signs 

a. Signs shall only be attached to the sides or front of 
a marquee and shall be 7 ft. or more above the ground. 

b. The sign shall be 6 sq. ft. or less. An individual 
letter sign shall be 2 ft. or less in height. 

5. Free Standing Signs 

a. No free standing signs shall be permitted except 
as authorized on appeal by the Board of Appeals. 

b. A temporary sign erected during construction of a 
building shall be 48 sq. ft. or less and 10 ft. or less in 
any dimension. 



ARTICLE 21. (continued) 



1-N. RESIDENTIAL, BUSINESS, INDUSTRIAL 
AND OTHER ZONES shall be as set forth in the Zon- 
ing Laws of the Town of Wilmington. 

Section 36.2 Administration 
36.2-A Permits Required 

1. A permit is required for the erection of all signs 
except those specifically exempt from Section 36 of the 
By-Law. 

2. Application for a sign permit shall be made in 
writing to the Building Inspector stating the proposed 
sign location by street and number, the names and ad- 
dresses of the owner and the sign contractor or erec- 
tor. The Building Inspector may require the submis- 
sion of plans and other information pertinent to con- 
struction and installation. 

3. A permit may not be issued to any person until a 
proper certificate of public liability insurance 
satisfactory to the Building Inspector is in force. 

4. A fee shall be paid to the Town for each sign per- 
mit and collected by the Building Inspector in accor- 
dance with an approved fee schedule. 

5. The permit number shall be clearly indicated on 
the sign. 

6. No permit shall be required to refinish an existing 
sign or change the display on a changeable letter sign. 

7. No permit is required for signs conforming to the 
Zoning Laws in a Residential Zone. 

36.2-B. Appeal 

1. A person aggrieved by any decision of the Building 
Inspector may appeal to the Board of Appeals. 

36.2-C. Enforcement 

1. The Building Inspector is charged with the en- 
forcement of Section 36 of the By-Law. 

2. Whoever violates any provision of Section 36 of the 
By-Law shall be punished by a fine not exceeding one 
hundred ($100) dollars for each offense. (Chapter 93, 
Section 33 of the General Laws.) 

3. The Building Inspector shall require the proper 
erection and maintenance of all signs. The Building 
Inspector may order the removal of any sign that is 
not properly maintained. 

4. Signs erected before the adoption of Section 36 of 
the By-Law shall not be rebuilt or relocated except in 
conformance with Section 36 of the By-Law. 

5. Signs erected before the adoption of Section 36 of 
the By-Law that do not conform to the provisions of 
Section 36 of the By-Law shall be made to so conform 
within five (5) years of the effective date of this Sec- 
tion 36 except that all signs must be made to conform 
with the provisions of Sections 2-D.2, 2-D.3, 2-D.6 and 
2-D.7 within 90 days of the effective date of Section 36 
of the By-Law. 

36.2-D Installation 

1. No sign shall be erected which obstructs any fire 
escape, door, ventilator, or other opening, or prevents 
free access to all parts of a roof. 



2. Electric Signs 

a. Flashing signs are prohibited. 

b. Red or green lights that would create a traffic 
hazard are prohibited. 

c. No exposed, uninsulated parts of an electrical sign 
shall be closer than nine (9) feet to the ground. 

3. No sign is permitted that in any way creates a 
traffic hazard. 

4. All parts of a sign shall be secured to the display 
surface or supporting structure. 

5. No sign shall be painted on the exterior surface of 
any wall, window, door or roof. 

6. No moving signs are permitted. 

7. No sign shall be placed in or upon any street, 
public building or place without permission of the 
Selectmen. 

36.3 Permitted Signs 
36.3-A Residential Districts 

1. A temporary sign advertising rental, lease or 
sale of the premises which shall be 6 sq. ft or less. 

2. A sign stating the home occupation or profession 
of a resident which shall be one sq. ft. or less. 

3. Religious and Public Premises are excluded from 
Section 36 of the By-Law. 

36.3-B.Business Districts 

36.3.B.L Same as 36.3.A.1 above. 

36.3.B.2. Wall Signs 

a. One wall sign shall be permitted for each business 
side of a building and direct entrance into a store. 

b. At gasoline stations and garages the front wall 
sign may be divided into separate signs indicating 
operations or departments, provided the total width of 
the separate signs does not exceed the maximum per- 
mitted for a wall sign. 

c. A wall sign shall be 4 feet or less in height. 

d. At the first floor level a sign may extend across 
the full width of the wall. At other than the first floor 
level, a sign shall be 6 ft. or less in length. 

e. The total sign area shall not exceed 25% of the 
area of the wall on which it is placed. 

f. One building directory shall be permitted on the 
exterior wall of the building at each entrance. A 
building directory shall be one sq. ft. or less for each 
occupant or tenant of the building. 

36.3.B.3. Projecting Signs 

a. One sign shall be permitted for each business. 

b. The sign shall be 4 ft. or less in height and shall not 
project more than 6 ft. from the face of the building, 
nor closer than 15 ft. from the property line. 

36.3.B.4. Marquee Signs 

a. Signs shall only be attached to the sides or front of 
a marquee and shall be 7 ft. or more above ground. 



105 



ARTICLE 22. (continued) 

C. Industrial Districts - IND 

1 A temporary sign advertising rental, sale or lease 
of premises not exceeding 24 sq. ft. 

2. Wall Signs 

Wall Signs shall be the same as for business districts 
except that signs shall be 6 ft. or less in height. 

3. Roof Signs 

a. One roof sign shall be permitted for each building. 

b. A roof sign shall be 10 ft. or less in height and shall 
not exceed 100 sq. ft. An individual letter roof sign 
shall be six ft. or less in height. 

4. Projecting Signs 

- Same as Sub-Section B. 

5. Marquee Signs 

- Same as Sub-Section B. 



6. Free Standing Signs 

a. No free standing signs shall be permitted except j 
as authorized on appeal by the Board of Appeals. 

b. A temporary sign erected during the construction 
of a building shall be 48 sq. ft. or less and 10 feet or less 
in any dimension. 

c. A free standing sign may be permitted for pur- 
poses of a business directory provided that no more 
than 20 sq. ft. shall be permitted for each business. 

D. Special Signs 

In particular instances the Board of Appeals may 
permit signs of larger maximum sizes than specified 
herein when any such sign is located at least 100 ft. 
from the nearest residential zoning district boundary 
or public way whichever is more distant, and within a 
Business or Industrial Zoning District, and when such 
a special permit is in the public interest; 



or do anything in relation thereto. (Request of the Planning Board) ' 

The Planning Board reported to the Town Meeting on the above Articles 21 and 22. Four (4) members of the 
Planning Board signed a motion to postpone indefinitely Articles 21 and 22. , 

Mr. Arthur Smith, Jr. asked the meeting to take Article 35 out of order. Motion so voted, | 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken on Article 41 of the Annual Town 
Meeting held on March 8, 1958, which reads as follows: I move that there is hereby established a Permanent 
Building Committee to have charge of all new building construction for the Town, including schools; such 
committee to consist of five members to be appointed by the Selectmen and Town Manager in the first instance 
for three years or shorter terms but eventually for three year terms in such manner that the terns of not 
more than two members will expire in any one year, and all vacancies through death, resignation or other- 
wise as well as by expiration of term to be filled in like manner by the Selectmen and Town Manager. 

In addition to the regular members of the committee, the following official agencies of the Town, namely 
the Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board and Town Manager shall each have the right to designate 
from time to time an advisory, non-voting member who shall have the right to participate in all meetings and 
obtain copies of all records, and the School Committee and Superintendent of Schools shall likewise have the 
right to designate one advisory non-voting member, each with like powers whenever school building construction 
is involved, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr. The motion followed exactly the words outlined above in Article 35. A 
vote was taken and the Moderator declared the motion lost. 



Motion to advance Article 36 was so voted. 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint from time to time 
a Building Committee to have charge of a new building construction project for the Town, including schools, 
such committee to consist of five members serving concurrent terms for the duration of the specific building 
project, and said Committee to be dissolved upon acceptance of each such project; and successive building 
committees shall be appointed by the Board of Selectmen for each building project; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion to pass over Article 36 and take no action thereon. So voted. 

Motion to recess for supper hour came at 5:40 p.m. Motion to return to the Gymnasium at 7:30 p,m. this 
evening was so voted. 



Mr, Callan called the meeting to order at 8:00 p.m. there being a quorum present. 



106 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of a Town 
Forest, and to determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, or by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent 
domain or receive as a gift for said purpose the certain parcels of land bounded and described as follows: 
Beginning at a point in the Wilmington -Andover Town Line, said point being designated as A-W6, thence 
easterly by said Town Line distant 1079 feet, more or less, to a point; thence southerly by land of 
Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc., distant 627 feet, more or less, to a point; thence westerly by land of 
Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc., distant 693 feet, more or less, to a point; thence southerly by land of 
Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc., distant 853 feet, more or less, to a point; thence easterly by land of 
Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc., distant 668.28 feet to a point; thence southerly by land of Wilmington 
Jr. Camp, Inc., distant 313.50 feet to a point; thence easterly by land of Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc. 
distant 1097.25 feet to a point in the Wilmington-Andover Town Line; thence southerly by said Town 
line distant 346.50 feet to a point A-W4; thence southerly by said Town line distant 567.68 feet to 
point A-W3; thence southerly by said Town line distant 28.90 feet to a point in the westerly side 
line of Andover Street; thence southerly by said line distant 355.42 feet, 136.74 feet, 285.54 
feet, 57.29 feet, 187.11 feet, 300.00 feet and 114.69 feet to a point; thence westerly by land of 
Landry distant 43.31 feet, 26.63 feet, 24.70 feet and 10.74 feet to a point; thence southerly by 
land of Landry distant 55.96 feet, 46.99 feet, 62.74 feet and 34.18 feet to a point; thence wester- 
ly by land of Clapp and by land of Ferguson distant 24.68 feet, 60.87 feet, 228.33 feet and 146.36 
feet to a point; thence southerly by land of Ferguson, by land of Evelyn Realty Trust and by land 
of Sciarappa distant 330.42 feet, 40.88 feet, 30.57 feet, 91.28 feet, 45.8 feet and 1564 feet, more 
or less, to a point; thence westerly by land of Spinelli, by land of Auditore, by land of Spinelli 
and by land of Bedell distant 300.33 feet, 264.52 feet, 490.33 feet, 138.02 feet, 209.57 feet, 
88.56 feet, 210.54 feet, 303 feet, more or less, 101.07 feet and 286.21 feet to a point; thence 
northerly by land of Brooks distant 290.15 feet, 163.94 feet, 166.20 feet, 7.62 feet, 158.42 feet 
and 173.38 feet to a point; thence easterly by land of Guidetti and Micheli and by land of Paolini 
distant 256.57 feet, 150.00 feet, 200.00 feet, 105.11 feet and 490 feet, more or less, to a point; 
thence northerly by land of Peolini distant 845 feet, more or less, to a point; thence easterly 
by land of Paolini distant 50 feet, more or less, to a point; thence northerly by land of Paolini 
by land of Tallini, by land of Catanese and by land of Roncalli Civic Property Association, Inc. 
distant 457.34 feet and 623 feet, more or less to a point; thence westerly by land of Roncalli 
Civic Property Association, Inc. distant 1156 feet, more or less, to a point; thence northerly by 
land of Robbins Realty Trust, by land of Barcellos and by land of DeBarcellos distant 1035 feet, 
more or less, to a point; thence westerly by land of DeBarcellos and by land of DeCosta distant 
614.90 feet, to a point in the easterly sideline of the 1962 County Layout of Ballardvale Street; 
thence northerly by said sideline distant 178.85 to a point; thence westerly across said Layout 
distant 50.00 feet to a point in the Wilmington-Andover Town Line; thence northerly by said Town 
Line distant 498.88 feet to point A-W8; thence northerly by said Town Line distant 909.15 feet to 
a point; thence easterly by said Town Line 588.90 feet to the point of beginning; excepting the 
following described parcel belonging to Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc. beginning at a point in the 
easterly sideline of the 1962 County Layout of Ballardvale Street, said point being southerly and 
distant 14 feet, more or less, from the southerly terminus of a curve of 794.82 feet radius; 
thence northerly by said sideline distant 14 feet, more or less, to a point of curvature; thence 
bearing to the right with a curve of 794.82 feet radius distant 165 feet, more or less to a point; 
then easterly distant 624 feet more or less to a point; thence southerly distant 200 feet, more 
or less, to a point; thence westerly distant 500 feet, more or less, to a point; thence northerly 
distant 25 feet, more or less, to a point; thence westerly distant 101 feet, more or less, to the 
point of beginning, all as shown cn a plan entitled "Plan of North Wilmington Town Forest Recreation 
Area, Wilmington, Mass. Scales: As Noted, January 3, 1975, Robert L. Higgins, Town Engineer," a 
copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Engineer; 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to reserve and grant within the above described parcel of land a 
right of way or rights of way for public or semi-public purposes; and to authorize the direct the Board of 
Selectmen to submit applications for grants in aid to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and/or Federal 
government; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $169,000 for 
the purpose of a Town Forest, and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive 
as a gift for said purpose the certain parcels of land bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point in the Wilmington-Andover Town Line, said point being designated as A-W6, thence 
easterly by said Town Line distant 1079 feet, more or less, to a point, thence southerly by land of 
Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc. distant 627 feet, more or less, to a point, thence westerly by land of 
Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc. distant 693 feet, more or less, to a point, thence southerly by land of 
Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc. distant 853 feet, more or less, to a point, thence easterly by land of 



107 



ARTICLE 23. (continued) 

Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc. distant 668.28 feet to a point, thence southerly by land of Wilmington 
Jr. Camp, Inc. distant 313.50 feet to a point, thence easterly by land of Wilmington Jr. Camp, 
Inc. distant 1097.25 feet to a point in the Wilmington-Andover Town Line, thence southerly by 
said Town Line distant 346.50 feet to point A-W4, thence southerly by said Town Line distant 
567.68 feet to point A-W3, thence southerly by said Town Line distant 28.90 feet to a point in 
the westerly side line of Andover Street, thence southerly by said line distant 355.42 feet, 
136.74 feet, 285.54 feet, 57.29 feet, 187.11 feet, 300.00 feet and 114.69 feet to a point, thence 
westerly by land of Landry distant 43.31 feet, 26.63 feet, 24.70 feet, and 10.74 feet to a point, 
thence southerly by land of landry distant 55.96 feet, 46.99 feet, 62.74 feet and 34.18 feet to 
a point, thence westerly by land of Clapp, by land of Ferguson and by land of Fiorenza distant 
24.68 feet, 60.87 feet, 228.33 feet, 146.36 feet and 548.44 feet to a point, thence northerly by 
land of Fiorenza distant 675.00 feet and 6.87 feet to a point, thence westerly by land of Fiorenza 
and by land of Paolini distant 840.00 feet to a point, thence northerly by land of Tallin! , by 
land of Catanese and by land of Roncalli Civic Property Association, Inc. distant 623 feet, more 
or less, to a point, thence westerly by land of Roncalli Civic Property Association, Inc. distant 
1156 feet, more or less, to a point, thence northerly by land of Robbins Realty Trust distant 
772 feet, more or less, to a point, thence easterly by land of Barcellos distant 980 feet, 
more or less to a point, thence northerly by land of Barcellos and by land of DeBarcellos 
distant 69 feet, more or less, 158.07 feet and 53.3 feet to a point, thence westerly by land 
of DeBarcellos and by land of DeCosta distant 1506.30 feet to a point in the easterly sideline 
of the 1962 County Layout of Ballardvale Street, thence northerly by said sideline distant 
415 feet, more or less, to a point, thence easterly by land of Wilmington Jr. Camp, Inc. 
distant 101 feet, more or less, to a point, thence southerly by said land distant 25 feet, 
more or less, to a point, thence easterly by said land distant 500 feet, more or less to a point, 
thence northerly by said land distant 200 feet, more or less to a point, thence westerly by said 
land distant 624 feet, more or less, to a point in said easterly sideline of Ballardvale Street, 
thence northerly by said sideline distant 259 feet, more or less, 523.44 feet, 200.00 feet, 
and 169.66 feet to a point in the Wilmington-Andover Town Line, thence easterly by said Town 
Line distant 312 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, all as shown on a plan entitled 
"Plan of North Wilmington Town Forest Recreation Area, Wilmington, Mass., Scales: as Noted, 
January 7, 1975, Robert L. Higgins, Town Engineer," a copy of which is on file in the office 
of the Town Engineer, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to reserve and grant within the 
above described parcel of land a right of way or rights of way for public or semi-public pur- 
poses; and to authorize and direct the Board of Selectmen to submit applications for grants in 
aid to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and/or Federal government; and the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow a sum or sums in the amount 
of $169,000.00 dollars and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized by Chapter 44 of the 
General Laws." The Finance Committee had no recommendation.' 

After some discussion the vote was called for. First vote on Article 23 lost by three votes. Yes-133 
No - 68 Mr. James R. Miceli, Selectman, asked for reconsideration of Article 23. Vote on reconsideration 
carried. Yes - 142 No - 66 Second vote on Article 23 carried the vote by more than two-thirds: Yes-164 
No-71 The Moderator declared motion so voted, a letter of opposition to this article was placed on file 
by the Town Clerk. 

ARTICLE 24o To see if the Town will vote to discontinue as a Town way the layout of Marion Street, from 
Burlington Avenue 210 feet, more or less, southwesterly, as recommended by the Planning Board, which dis- 
continuance is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein is hereby referred to 
for more particular description; and to authorize the Selectmen to take by right of eminent domain the fee 
in the land contained in the above discontinuance; and to determine how appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise for the purpose of this 
article; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Miceli: "I move that we pass over Article 24 and take no action thereon. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue as a Town way the layout of Ballardvale Street, 
from 1570 feet, more or less, south of the Wilmington-Andover Town Line to the Wilmington-Andover Town Line, 
as recommended by the Planning Board, which discontinuance is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and 
which with plans therein, is hereby referred to for a more particular description; and to determine how an 
appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or 
otherwise, for the purpose of paying damages arising from said discontinuance; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 



108 



ARTICLE 25. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. Aldo A. Caira: "I move that we pass over Article 25 and take no action thereon. Motion so 
voted. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by adding the 
definition of the term "Professional Occupation" as paragraph 16 in Section II thereof 

16. PROFESSIONAL OCCUPATION: A recognized profession, such as, but not limited to, that of doctor, 
lawyer, engineer, accountant or architect, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Motion by Mr. William G. Hooper, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Wilmington by adding the definition of the term "Professional Occupation" as paragraph 16 in Section II 
thereof 

16. PROFESSIONAL OCCUPATION: A recognized profession, such as, but not limited to, that of doctor, 
lawyer, engineer, accountant or architect." 

This motion was signed by five members of the Planning Board. Finance Committee reported approval. The 
Planning Board recommended approval in the words of the motion. Amendment by Mr. Lewis to leave out the 
words "but not limited to." Amendment lost. Main motion taken by standing: Yes - 139 No - 11 Motion 
carries and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by adding 
the definition of the term "Home Occupation" as paragraph 17 in Section II thereof 

17. HOME OCCUPATION: An occupation, conducted within a building or a portion thereof by a 
resident of the premises. Such occupations include: 

(1) an endeavor involving the production and sale of goods or services from a dwelling 
for profit, which endeavor is customarily conducted in residential areas and does not 
change the residential character of the area. 

(2) contracting for services where the services are not provided on the premises, 
except on an appointment basis 

or take any action relative thereto. 

Motion by Mr, William G. Hooper, Jr.:"I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Wilmington by adding the definition of the term "Home Occupation" as paragraph 17 in Section II thereof 

17, HOME OCCUPATION: An occupation, conducted within a building or a portion thereof by a 

resident of the premises. Such occupations include: 

(1) an endeavor involving the production and sale of goods or services from a dwelling 
for profit, which endeavor is customarily conducted in residential areas and does not 
change the residential character of the area. 

(2) contracting for services where the services are not provided on the premises, 
except on an appointment basis." 

Finance Committee recommended approval This motion was signed by five members of the Planning Board. The 
Planning Board recommended approval in the words of the motion. Mr, Lewis offered an amendment to delete 
(1). Vote taken and amendment lost. Main motion taken by standing: Yes - 112 No - 28 Motion carries. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by substituting 
for sub-paragraphs 9 F and G, Section III-lA thereof the following wording: 
f. Professional occupation or home occupation, provided that 

(1) The professional office, business or other occupation shall be conducted by not more 
than two residents of the premises; 

(2) not more than one (1) person, other than residents of the premises, shall be regularly 
employed on the premises in connection with such use; 

(3) no equipment or process shall be used in such home occupation which creates noise, 
vibration, glare, fumes, odors, or electrical interference detectable to the normal senses 
off the lot, if the occupation is conducted in a single-family residence, or outside the 
dwelling unit if conducted in other than a single-family residence. In the case of 
electrical interference, no equipment or process shall be used which creates visual or 
audible interference in any radio or television receivers off the premises, or causes 
fluctuations in line voltage off the premises; no other noise, vibration, smoke, dust, 
odors, heat, glare, unsightliness or other nuisance shall be produced which is discem- 
able from other properties; 

(4) the use shall be clearly incidental to and secondary to the use as a residence; 



109 



ARTICLE 28. (continued) 

(5) no more than twenty-five percent (25%) of the floor area of any one story and of the 
dwelling shall be used for a home occupation; 

(6) there shall be no external evidence of the office or occupation, no extensive storage 
or public display of goods or wares, and no signs except as permitted in Section IV-5. 

(7) there shall be provided off-street parking for any employee or visitors in connection 
with such use; 

(8) no traffic shall be generated by such home occupation in greater volumes than would 
normally be expected in a residential neighborhood. Bicycles and vehicles used in connec- 
tion with the occupation shall be parked in the rear or side yard or in a structure, and 
any need for parking generated by the conduct of such home occupation shall be met off the 
street and other than in the required front yard. For the purpose of this section ten (10) 
trips per day per dwelling unit would normally be expected. 

(9) no more than four (4) pupils will receive instruction simultaneously, or in the case 
of musical instruction, no more than two (2) pupils during a single hour; 

(10) there shall be no sale to the public of antiques or similar hand goods such as furni- 
ture, household utensils and clothing except for the sale of such goods as a garage, yard, 
tag or similar sale, provided that there shall be no more than two (2) such sales, each 
extending for less than thirty-six (36) hours, at any premises during a calendar year. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion as above read by Mr. William G. Hooper, Jr. and was signed 
by four other Planning Board members. The Planning Board reported approval in the words of the motion. 
Vote on motion was taken by standing: Yes - 117 No - 23 Motion carries and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will amend Section V of the Zoning By-Law by adding a sentence after the end 
of the first sentence in Section V-3 A to read: "Lot width is the shortest distance between the side lines 
of the lot measured at any point between the street line and the depth of the building." or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Hanlon to vote to postpone indefinitely Article 29. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will amend Section V of the Zoning By-Law by adding to the headings of 
Columns 3 and 4 of the table in Section V-1. "Schedule of Requirements" after the word "Frontage" the 
words "and lot width", and add a footnote to these columns to read "when the radius of a curve measured 
on the side line of a street is one hundred (100) feet or less, the frontage may be reduced to eighty (80) 
feet and the lot requirement shall apply at the building line and at all points measured through the build- 
ing", or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. William J. Hanlon: "I move that the Town vote to postpone indefinitely Article 30." Motion so 
voted. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of the following described 
streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General 
Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public 
Ways and specific repairs thereon), which layout is filed in the office of che Town Clerk, and which, with 
plans therein, is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of this Article; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise for the purpose of construction of said way and for 
the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, slope, drainage or other easements therefor; or 
to do anything in relation thereto: 

a. Biggar Avenue from Salem Street 1282.5 feet southerly and westerly 

b. Ring Avenue from Salem Street 1149.6 feet southerly 

c. Cornell Place, from Fordham Road 750 feet westerly 

d. Sherbum Place, from Shawsheen Avenue 725 feet northerly 

Motion by Mr. James F. Banda, Selectman: "I move that the Town vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of 
the following described streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the 
provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and 
Discontinuance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon), which layout is filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk, and which, with plans therein, is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as 



110 



ARTICLE 31. (continued) 

may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article: 

a. Biggar Avenue from Salem Street 1282.5 feet southerly and westerly 

b. Ring Avenue from Salem Street 1149.6 feet southerly 

c. See action under a further motion. 

d. Sherbum Place, from Shawsheen Avenue 725 feet northerly." 

Motion under Article #31 was so voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

Motion under Article #31c by Mr. Banda: "I move that we pass over Section "c" of Article 31 and take no 
action thereon. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of the following described 
streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General 
Laws (Chapter 80, as amended, relating to the Assessment of Betterments), which layout is filed in the office 
of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein, is hereby referred to for more particular description; and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other 
easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article; and to determine how an appropriation 
shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise for the 
purpose of construction of said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, 
slope, drainage or other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

a. Cleveland Avenue, from Swain Road 335.81 feet westerly 

b. Winston Avenue from Congress Street 400 ft. northerly to Randolph Road 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Motion under Article 32 by Mr, A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that we 
pass over Article 32, Sections a and b and take no action thereon," Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to alter and relocate as Town Ways, the layout of the following 
described streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions 
of General Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinu- 
ance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon), which alteration and relocation is filed in the office of 
the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein, is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other 
easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article; and to determine how an appropriation 
shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise for the 
purpose of construction of said ways and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, 
slope, drainage or other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

a. Hopkins Street, from 813 feet, more or less, southwesterly of Shawsheen Avenue to 1675 feet, more 
or less southwesterly of Shawsheen Avenue 

b. Chestnut Street from Burlington Avenue 1495 feet, more or less, southerly 

c. Marion Street, from Chestnut Street 305 feet, more or less, westerly 

Motion under Article 33a by Mr. James R, Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appro- 
priate the sum of $2,800 to alter and relocate as a Town Way, the layout of Hopkins Street, from 813 feet, 
more or less southwesterly of Shawsheen Avenue to 1675 feet, more or less southwesterly of Shawsheen Avenue, 
as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws 
(Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways 
and Specific repairs thereon), which alteration and relocation is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and 
which with plans therein, is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as may be 
necessary to effect the purpose of this Article. Finance Committee no recommendation. Motion voted unani- 
mously and so declared by the Moderator. 

Motion under Article 33b by Mr. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $50.00 to alter and relocate as a Town Way, the layout of Chestnut Street from Burlington Avenue, 
five hundred feet (500) more or less, southerly, reported adversely by the Planning Board and laid out by 
the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, 
Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon), which alteration and 
relocation is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein, is hereby referred to 
for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain 
such land, slope, drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article." 
Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 



Ill 



ARTICLE 33. (continued) 

Motion under Article 33c by Mr. Miceli: "I move that we pass over Section "c" of Article 33 and take no 
action thereon." Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Tovm will vote to accept G. L. Chapter 32B, Section 7A, which reads: "Shall the 
town, in aldition to the payment of fifty percent of a premium for contributory group life and health insur- 
ance for employees in the service of the town and their dependents, pay a subsidiary or additional rate" or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr. "I move that the Town vote to accept General Laws Chapter 32B, Section 7A 
which reads "Shall the town, in addition to the payment of fifty percent of a premium for contributory 
group life and health insurance for employees in the service of the town and their dependents, pay a subsidi- 
ary or additional rate"; and further that the Towti vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$80,000 for this purpose." Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Vote taken on the motion by standing 
Yes - 141 No - 102 Motion so voted. 

Mr. Graney called for reconsideration of Article 34. Vote taken by voice and the Moderator ruled motion 
lost. 

Articles 35 and 36 taken out of order earlier in meeting. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section III-6C Uses in a Flood Plain District of the 
Zoning By-law by deleting Section III-6C and substituting the following: 

C. In the Flood Plain District, the Board of Appeals may grant permission for any use and/or structure, 
subject to all of the following: 

1. The request has been referred to the Planning Board, the Board of Health, and the Conservation 
Commission and reported upon by all three Boards or thirty days shall have elapsed following such 
referral without receipt of such reports; 

2. The land is shown to be neither subject to flooding nor unsuitable for the proposed use because of 
hydrological and/or topographic conditions; 

3. The proposed use will not be detrimental to the public health, safety and welfare; and 

4. The proposed use will comply in all respects to the provisions of the underlying District or Districts 
within which the land is located; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion under Article 37 by Mr. Arthur W. Bureau: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section III-6C Uses in 
a Flood Plain District of the Zoning By-law by deleting Section III-6C and substituting the following: 

C. In the Flood Plain District, the Board of Appeals may grant permission for any use and/or structure, 
subject to all the following: 

1. The request has been referred to the Planning Board, the Board of Health, and the Conservation 
Commission and reported upon by all three Boards or thirty days shall have elapsed following 
such referral without receipt of such reports; 

2. The land is shown to be neither subject to flooding nor unsuitable for the proposed use because 
of hydrological and/or topographic conditions; 

3. The proposed use will not be detrimental to the public health, safety and welfare; and 

4. The proposed use will comply in all respects to the provisions of the underlying District or 
Districts within which the land is located." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. 

The Planning Board reported approval in the words of the motion. Standing vote taken: Yes - 131 No - 2 
Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept Sections 82 - 85 inclusive of Chapter 71 of the Mass. 
General Laws, clarifying certain rights and responsibilities of public secondary school students; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Aldo A, Caira: "I move that the Town vote to accept Sections 82 - 85 inclusive of Chapter 71 
of the Mass. General La«7S, clarifying certain rights and responsibilities of public secondary school 
students." Finance Committee recommended approval. Mr. Krasznekerwicz, a School Student was allowed to 
speak on this motion. A voice vote was called for and the Moderator declared that the Ayes have it and 
the motion was so voted. 



112 





ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to revise Chapter 5 - Sections 25 and 26 of the Town By-Laws: 
Within the Town limits of Wilmington, Massachusetts no person or persons shall discharge any firearm, air or 
gas operated gun of any kind except members of the Police Department and other authorized law enforcement 
officers whether Federal, State, or Municipal in performance of their lawful duties; also with the exception 
of a person protecting his life or property, and a person at an authorized target range. The Police Chief 
may issue permits for target ranges and shall inspect such places and establish safety requirements for their 
use. The permit shall be valid for one year and may be revoked for cause at any time by the Police Chief, or 
I do anything in relation thereto. 

t Motion by Mrs. Joan M. Sadowski: "I move to see if the Town will vote to revise Chapter 5 - Sections 25 and 
i 26 of the Town By-Laws: Within the Town limits of Wilmington, Massachusetts no person or persons shall dis- 
' charge any firearm, air or gas operated gun of any kind except members of the Police Department and other 

authorized law enforcement officers whether Federal, State, or municipal in performance of their lawful duties 
also with the exception of a person protecting his life or property, and a person at an authorized target 
range. The Police Chief may issue permits for target ranges and shall inspect such places and establish 
safety requirements for their use. The permit shall be valid for one year and may be revoked for cause at 
I any time by the Police Chief. Responsible organizations observing historical events or traditional services 
by gravesides, using firearms with blank cartridges and contractors' powder-fired charge tools are specific- 
ally exempted from this By-Law." Finance Committee recommended approval. 

Amendment by Mr. Carl Backman, Jr.: "I move to amend the motion by adding after the words "with the exception 
of a person protecting his life or property" also excepting the discharge of firearms using blank ammunition 
in fulfilling but not limited to the needs of historical, ceremonial, construction, competitive and sporting 
activities." Amendment was put to a vote and the Moderator declared the motion was so voted. Main motion 
as amended so voted, and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
by adding a new section to Chapter 3, namely, Section 25, as follows: 

"The Selectmen shall appoint a Board of Appeals under the provisions of Chapter 41, Section 81Z of 
the General Laws for the purpose of hearing and acting upon appeals under the provisions of Chapter 
i 41, Section 81E through 81H, inclusive, Official Map, and 81K through SlGg, inclusive. Subdivision 

Control Law; 

or do anything in relation thereto. (Petition of Arthur E. Harding, Jr.) 

' Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion by Mr. Arthur E. Harding, Jr. The motion was read in the 

exact words of the Article 40 above. Voice vote taken and the motion was lost and so declared by the 
! Moderator. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington, 1972, by deleting in its entirety Chapter 5 Public Regulations, Section 32. 2C, which states: 
"the removal for sale, gift or delivery beyond the town limits of earth shall be allowed only under special 
permission of the Board, and under such conditions as the Board shall impose." and inserting in its place the 
following: 

Sectioni 32. 2C. The removal for sale, gift or delivery of earth shall be allowed within the limits of the 
Town only, and by, special permission of the Board and under such conditions as the Board shall inipose after 
strict conformance with the regulations contained in this Section 32, Earth Removal, or do anything else in 
relation thereto. (Petition of Madelyn A. McKie) 

Motion by Mrs. Madelyn A. McKie: "I move to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington, 1972, by deleting in its entirety Chapter 5, Public Regulations, Section 32. 2C which states: 
"The removal for sale or delivery beyond the town limits of earth shall be allowed only under special per- 
mission of the Board, and under such conditions as the Board shall impose." and to insert in its place the 
following: 

Section 32. 2C. The removal for sale, gift or delivery of earth shall be allowed within the limits of 
the Town only, and, by special permission of the Board and under such conditions as the Board shall impose 
after strict conformance with the regulations contained in this Section 32, Earth Removal; with the exception 
that those businesses which process and/or treat earth products, or engage in the manufacture of products 
that contain earth products, may be allowed sales and delivery beyond the limits of the Town by special per- 
mission of the Board, provided that there has been strict compliance with all other provisions of this 
Section 32." 



113 



ARTICLE 41. (continued) 

The Finance Committee recommended approval. After some discussion a standing vote was taken. Yes - 90 
No - 119 Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington, 1972, by deleting in its entirety Chapter 5, Public Regulations, Section 32. G" Approval of 
the renewal of a permit for a period not in excess of one (1) year may be made by the Board without hear- 
ing, if the Board finds that all conditions have been complied with and that the work has been carried 
on continuously and in good faith." and to insert in its place the following: 

Section 32.20 Any modification or any renewal of a permit shall be considered by the Board, if 
the Board finds that all conditions have been complied with and that the work has been carried on 
continuously and in good faith, only after compliance with the provisions of Section 32. 2D and 
Section 32. 2E of this Chapter 5, or do anything else in relation thereto. (Petition of Madelyn A. McKie) ' 

Motion by Mrs. Madeljm A. McKie: "I move that the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmingto 
1972, by deleting in its entirety Chapter 5, Public Regulations, Section 32. 2G "Approval of the renewal of a ■ 
permit for a period not in excess of one (1) year may be made by the Board without hearing, if the Board f ind | 
that all conditions have been complied with and that the work has been carried on continuously and in good 
faith." and to insert in its place the following: 

Section 32. 2G Any modification or any renewal of a permit shall be considered by the Board, if 

the Board finds that all conditions have been complied with and that the work has been carried on 

continuously and in good faith, only after compliance with the provisions of Section 32. 2D and 

32. 2E of this Chapter 5." ; 

The Finance Committee recommended approval. A voice vote was taken and the Moderator declared that the ayes ; 
have it. So voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to General Business, the following described premises: The 
land in Wilmington situated in the southerly side of Lowell Street and bounded as follows: Northerly by 
Lowell Street; Westerly by West Street; Southerly by the Industrial District; and Easterly by Route 93, or 
do anything in relation thereto. (Petition of Wilbur F. Thomas) 

Motion by Mr. Wilbur F. Thomas: "I move to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington, by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to General Business, the following described premises: 
The land in Wilmington situated in the southerly side of Lowell Street and bounded as follows: 

Northerly by Lowell Street; Westerly by West Street; Southerly by the Industrial District; 1 

Easterly by Route 93. 

The Finance Committee recommended disapproval. The Planning Board reported disapproval in the words of the 
motion. Standing vote taken: Yes - 17 No - 100 Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and the Map of the Town of Wilmington 
and change from the Flood Plain District, but without changing the underlying zoning district of the follow- 
ing described parcel of land, being shown as Lot C on Plan of Land in Wilmington, Massachusetts, surveyor 
being K. J. Miller Co., Inc. of 106 West Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts. Surveyed for Daniel and Lorraine 
Ballou, dated May 2, 1969, and being a Registered Land Surveyor and Civil Engineer. Recorded at the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds, Book of Plans 108 Plan 128, bounded and described as follows: Southeasterly 
by Park Street, 174.88 feet; Northeasterly by land now or formerly of Wigo and David Anderson, 479.37 feet; 
Northwesterly by land now or formerly of the Town of Wilmington, as shown on said plan, 87.19 feet; and 
Southwesterly by lot B, as shown on said plan, 473.41 feet. Containing 70,991 square feet of land according 
to said plan, being conveyed to us by deed also a portion of the premises, recorded in Book 1727 at page 55. 
Both lots subject to easements and restrictions of record, if any there be, insofar as the same are now in 
force and applicable, or do anything in relationship therein. (petition of Daniel H. Ballo»i) 

Motion by Mr. Daniel H. Ballou: "I move that the Town vote to amend said Article #44 to read and describe as 
follows. Southeasterly by Park Street 130' Northeasterly by land now owned by Daniel and Lorraine Ballou 
44.88' from this point of land, to a point of land Northeasterly by land now or formerly of Wigo and David 
Anderson, from this Southeasterly point 44.88' or at the 130'point of land owned by Daniel and Lorraine 
Ballou to run 200 feet to a point of land now owned by Daniel and Lorraine Ballou Northwesterly by land now 
owned by Daniel and Lorraine Ballou for a distance of 130 feet to a point of land and to run Southwesterly by 
lot "B" now owned by Robert and Donna Lewis 200' to a point of boundary on Park Street." 



ARTICLE 44. (continued) 

Finance Committee and Planning Board reported approval. Standing vote taken: Yes - 175 No - 13 Motion 
carries, and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and the Zoning Map of the Town of 
Wilmington by changing the following described parcels from a Single Residence "B" to a General Business 
District; Land on Concord Street bounded Northerly by land of Park Realty Trust (shown as Lot No. 5 on 
Map No. 91 of the Assessors Maps of the Town of Wilmington); Easterly by Interstate No. 93; Southerly by 
Concord Street and Westerly by Short Street. Said parcels to be re-zoned are shown as all or portions of 
Lots No. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 10a on said Map No. 91, or do anything in relation thereto. (Petition of Warren R. 
Eisener) 

Motion by Mr. Arthur E. Harding, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and the 
Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by changing the following described parcels from a Single Residence 
"A" to a General Business District; land on Concord Street bounded Northerly by land of Park Realty Trust 
(shown as Lot #5 on Map #91 of the Assessors Maps of the Town of Wilmington); Easterly by Interstate #93; 
Southerly by Concord Street and Westerly by Short Street, Said parcels to be rezoned are shown as all or 
portions of Lots No. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 10a on said Map #91." Finance Committee recommended disapproval. 
The Planning Board reported disapproval in the words of the motion. Mr. Fred F. Cain asked to go on record 
as being in favor of this motion. Standing motion taken: Yes - 20 No - 101 Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the town will vote to authorize Selectmen to sell and convey to Kevin J. McMillan 
of Dunton Road, Wilmington, Massachusetts a certain parcel of town-owned land; parcel 40-56 on assessors 
map No. 80. 

Bounded southerly by Parker Street X 225 feet; bounded westerly by Fairmont Avenue 120 feet; 
bounded northly by Lots 55 and 41 three distances 114 feet by 20 feet - 114 feet; bounded 
easterly Plymouth Avenue 100 feet. Containing about 24,000 square feet subject to such terms 
and conditions as selectmen may determine and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for 
such conveyance or do anything in relation thereto. (Petition of Katrina R. Guarino) 

Motion: "I move that the Town of Wilmington vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Kevin J. 

McMillan of Dunton Road, Wilmington, Massachusetts, a certain parcel of Town-owned land, parcels 40 and 

56 on Map 40, for a sum of not less than eight thousand dollars $8,000.00), land described as follows: 
Bounded southerly by Parker Street 225 feet; bounded Westerly by Fairmont Avenue 120 feet; bounded 
northerly by Lots 55 and 41 three distances 114 feet by 20 feet - 114 feet; bounded easterly by 
Plymouth Avenue 100 feet. Containing about 24,000 square feet subject to such terms and condi- 
tions as the Selectmen may determine." 

The Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Standing vote taken: Yes - 150 No - 3 Motion carries. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of the following described 
street, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General 
Laws (Chapter 82 as amended related to the Layout, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public 
Ways, and Specific Repairs thereon) which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which with 
plan therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing 
said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land slope easements and other 
easements, therefor; or do anything in relation thereto: 

a. A new way, known as Wobum Street By-pass from Woburn Street opposite the intersection of 
Fames Street, easterly and then northerly a distance of 3,000 feet, more or less, to Lowell 
Street. (Petition of Arthur E. Harding, Jr.) 

Motion by Mr. Harding: "I move that the Town vote to postpone indefinitely Article #47. A voice vote was 
taken and the Moderator said the "Ayes" have it. 

Motion came at 11:45 p.m. to adjourn there being no further business to come before the meeting. Voted to 
adjourn. 

Number of voters checked in on March 8, 1975: Day 652 

Evening 475 

Number of voters checked in on March 15, 1975: Day 294 

Evening 270 



115 



ARTICLES VOTED BY TAXATION 
ARTICLES VOTED BY BORROWING 



$233,478 
169,000 



A true copy: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - JUNE 23, 1975 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed by the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium, Church Street, Wilmington, the 23rd of 
June, 1975 at seven thirty o'clock p.m. to consider and act on the following Articles: 

Mr. John Callan, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:40 p.m. there being a quonrni present. The 
Moderator asked the meeting to stand in silence and personally pray for guidance in our action tonight. The 
Moderator instructed the Town Clerk to note that this meeting was properly served and posted according to 
our Town By-laws. I, Esther L. Russell, Town Clerk certify that this was properly done. 

Mr. Callan read the Warrant as far as the call to meeting and was interrupted by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis, 
Chairman, Selectmen: "I move that the Moderator dispense with further reading of the Warrant and take up and 
make reference to each article by number." So voted. 

ARTICLE 1. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purpose of providing health insurance for Town employees; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager: "I move that the sum of $132,000.00 be appropriated for the 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield and Group Life Account 941; with the sum of $50,000.00 to be raised by transfer from 
the current budget of the School Department Account 600, the sum of $20,000.00 to be raised by transfer from 
the current Snow and Ice Account 320 and the balance of $62,000.00 to be raised by transfer from the Revenue 
Sharing Account. Finance Committee recommended approval of $132,000.00. Vote taken by voice and the 
Moderator declared motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 2. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purpose of providing a cost of living increase for the School Traffic Supervisors; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli, Selectman: "I move that the sum of $4,000.00 be appropriated for the purpose 
of providing a cost of living increase starting July 1, 1975 for the School Traffic Supervisors; and that 
said sum be raised by transfer from the current Interest on Anticipation and Authentication Fees Account 
#1000." Finance Committee recommended disapproval. After some discussion Mr. Miceli asked to move the 
question. Standing vote: Yes - 234 No - 4 Motion to close debate so voted. 

Mr. Callan read the main motion and asked for a voice vote. The Moderator declared the motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 3. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purpose of providing a cost of living increase for employees not subject to collec- 
tive bargaining constracts, starting July 1, 1975, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr.: "I move that the sum of $24,900.00 be appropriated for the purpose of 
providing a cost of living increase starting July 1, 1975, for employees not subject to collective bargaining 
contracts; and that said sum be raised by transfer from current Interest on Anticipation and Authentication 
Fees Account #1000." Finance Committee recommended disapproval. The merits of this motion were fully dis- 
cussed. Mr. Morris strongly recommended this adjusted increase. Selectmen Boylen, Gillis and Miceli asked 
the meeting to support this motion. Mr. Joseph Courtney, was questioned by Mr. Callan whether or not he was 
speaking as an attorney or for himself x^hen he urged the meeting to support this increase. Mr. Courtney 
answered for himself. When the debate came to a close Mr. Callan read the motion again and called for a voice 
vote. The Moderator declared the motion so voted. 



116 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of pursuing 
litigation concerning multi-family subsidized housing in Wilmington; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis, Selectman: "I move that the sum of $20,000.00 be appropriated for the purpose 
of pursuing litigation concerning multi-family subsidized housing in Wilmington; and that said sum be raised 
by transfer from the Reserve Fund Account #900." The Finance Committee recommended approval. A short dis- 
cussion followed. Mr. Alan Altman, Town Counsel answered questions. The Moderator read the motion and 
called for a standing vote. Yes - 164 No - 107 Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to lease in the name of the Town any 
portion or the whole of the parcel of land belonging to the Town on Chestnut Street on which the old South 
School stands, together with the buildings thereon, and fix the terms of the lease, or do anything in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James F. Banda, Selectman: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to lease in 
the name of the Town any portion or the whole of the parcel of land belonging to the Town on Chestnut Street 
on which the old South School stands, together with the buildings thereon, and fix the terms of the lease." 
Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend, in accordance with the Home Rule Procedures Act, Chapter 
592 of the Acts of 1950 entitled "An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for the Town of 
Wilmington" by adding the following subsection: 
Section 12(a) 1 

Notwithstanding paragraph 12 (a) , the Town Manager may appoint a Director of Public Safety instead of 

the appointment of a Chief of Police and/or Chief of the Fire Department. 
This amendment shall take effect 31 days after the election at which this charter amendment is approved; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

At this point the Moderator asked that the Town Clerk include in the minutes of this meeting a letter 
Mr. Morris filed in her office on June 4, 1975. 

June 4, 1975 

Mrs. Esther L. Russell, Town Clerk 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Mass. 01887 
Dear Mrs. Russell: 

I wish to file with you the following statement in accordance with Section 10 of Chapter 43B of the 
General Laws: 

I propose that Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950, an Act Establishing a Town Manager Form 
of Government for the Town of Wilmington, be amended by adding after Section 12 (a) the 
following subsections: 

Section 12(a) 1: 

Notwithstanding paragraph 12(a), the Town Manager may appoint a Director of Public Safety 
instead of the appointment of a Chief of Police and/or Chief of the Fire Department. 

Section 12(a) 2: 

Notwithstanding paragraph 12(a), the Town Manager may appoint cemetery commissioners, 
water commissioners and sewer commissioners or he may abolish reorganize, and consolidate 
such offices or departments within the framework of a department of public works. 

Very truly yours, 

s/Sterling C. Morris 
Town Manager 



117 



ARTICLE 6. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to amend, in accordance with the Home Rule Pro- 
cedures Act, Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950, entitled "An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government 
for the Town of Wilmington", by adding the following subsection: 
Section 12(a) 1 

Notwithstanding paragraph 12(a), the Town Manager may appoint a Director of Public Safety instead of 

the appointment of a Chief of Police and/or Chief of the Fire Department. 
This amendment shall take effect 31 days after the election at which this charter amendment is approved." 
The Finance Committee recommended approval. After much discussion a standing vote was taken: Yes - 76 
No - 237 Motion lost. 

Question came to reconsider Article 1. After maker of motion was questioned by the Moderator, Mr. Callan 
ruled motion was out of order. Denied. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend, in accordance with the Home Rule Procedures Act, Chapter 
592 of the Acts of 1950, entitled "An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for the Town of 
Wilmington," by adding the following subsection: 
Section 12(a) 2 

Notwithstanding paragraph 12 (a), the Town Manager may appoint cemetery commissioners, water commis- 
sioners and sewer commissioners or he may abolish, reorganize, and consolidate such offices together 
with other appropriate offices or departments within the framework of a department of public works. 

This amendment shall take effect 31 days after the election at which this charter amendment is approved; or 

do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Sterling Morris: "I move to pass over this article and take no action thereon. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Wilmington Building By-Laws, Division No. 1 
Administration by adding to section 6A (after Foundation Permits) the following item: Change of Ownership 
Inspection - $25.00 or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Charles Lawrenson, Building Inspector: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Town of Wilming- 
ton Building By-Laws, Division No. 1, Administration, by adding to Section 6A (after Foundation Permits) the 
following item: Change of Ownership Inspection - $25.00." The Finance Committee recommended approval. 
A short debate followed. The Moderator read the motion and called for a voice vote. Motion lost and so 
declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the Public Buildings 
Department for the purpose of paying a portion of the cost for the use of Town property for Civic Events 
and Functions by other then Town Departments, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James Miceli: "I move that the sum of $7,000.00 be appropriated for the Public Buildings 
Department for the purpose of paying a portion of the cost for the use of Town property for civic events and 
functions by other than Town Departments; with the sum of $5,600.00 to be raised by transfer from the current 
Community and Economic Development Account #125 and the balance of $1,400.00 to be raised by transfer from 
the current Interest on Anticipation and Authentication Fees Account #1000." Finance Committee recommended 
approval. Motion put to a voice vote and it was so voted and declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the Permanent Building 
Committee for the purpose of providing preliminary plans and cost estimates for educational facilities; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion: "I move that the sum of $35,000 be appropriated for the Permanent Building Committee for the purpose 
of providing preliminary plans and cost estimates for educational facilities: with the sum of $7,800.00 to 
be raised by transfer from the current Employees Retirement Account #959, the sum of $11,000.00 to be raised 
by transfer from the current Additional Employees Account #961, the sum of $15,000.00 to be raised by transfer 
from the current Veterans' Aid Account #510, and the balance of $1,200.00 to be raised by transfer from the 
current Local Transportation Account #924." This motion was made by Mr. Arthur R. Smith. The Finance 
Committee recommended approval. After some discussion the motion was read and the vote taken by voice. 
Moderator declared the ayes have it. So voted. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to file a petition with the 
General Court for special legislation which would authorize the Commonwealth to reimburse the Town for an 
amount not in excess of 50% of the cost of the acquisition and development of land for a Town Forest, which 



118 



ARTICLE 11. (continued) 

acquisition was authorized in a vote adopted under Article 23 at the Annual Town Meeting on March 15, 1975. 

Motion by Mr. James Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to file a petition 
with the General Court for special legislation which would authorize the Commonwealth to reimburse the Town 
for an amount not in excess of 507o of the cost of the acquisition and development of land for a Town Forest, 
which acquisition was authorized in a vote adopted under Article 23 at the Annual Town Meeting on March 15, 
1975." The Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion put to a voice vote and the Moderator declared 
the motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for the construction of sewers, 
sewerage systems, and sewage treatment and disposal facilities and for the acquisition of interests in land 
whether by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, and to authorize the assessment of betterments, all in ac- 
cordance with Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 and all Acts in amendment and in addition thereto and other 
General or Special law hereto enabling; to determine whether said funds shall be raised by taxation, transfer 
from available funds, or by borrowing under the provisions of Chapter 44, or by any combination thereof; and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for any Federal and State Aid which may be available as contribu- 
tions towards the cost of the project, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that the Town vote to appropriate $7,000,000.00 for the construction 
of sewers, sewerage systems, and sewage treatment and disposal facilities and for the acquisition of interest 
in land whether by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, in connection therewith, and to authorize the 
assessment of betterments, all in accordance with Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 and all Acts in amendment 
and in addition thereto and other General or Special law hereto enabling; and that the Board of Selectmen be 
and hereby is authorized to apply for any Federal and State Aid which may be available as contribution 
towards the cost of the project; that to meet said appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of $7,000,000.00 at one time or from time to time 
and issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, each issue of such bonds or notes to be payable in not more 
than twenty (20) years from its date all pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (1) as 
amended." The Finance Committee recommended disapproval by Bond Issue. After an amendment was read Mr. 
Casey, Chairman of the Finance Committee said they had changed their vote - 4 to 4. 

Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that the appropriation of $7,000,000.00 under Article 12 be reduced to 
read $5,843,400.00." Mr. Callan said our by-laws require us to vote on the larger figure first. Need a two- 
third vote. Standing: Yes - 162 No - 59 Motion carries. Mr. Callan said we would not need to vote on 
the amendment since this vote carried. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to file a petition with the 
State Legislature to authorize the appointment of Robert J. Andersen, to the position of Patrolman in the 
Town of Wilmington Police Department, notwithstanding that he is more than 32 years of age. By Petition. 

Motion by Mr. Robert J. Andersen: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition 
the State Legislature to authorize that Robert J. Andersen be allowed to take the Civil Service Police 
Entrance Examination for the position of Patrolman in the Wilmington Police Department, notwithstanding that 
he is more than thirty-two years of age." The Finance Committee recommended approval. Voice vote taken and 
it was declared voted by the Moderator. 

There being no further business to come before this meeting a motion to adjourn was made by Mr. George 
Boylen, Jr. Voted to adjourn. Adjourned at 10:10 p.m. 

There were four hundred and two (402) voters checked in at this meeting. 



Attest: Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 



119 



Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF CASH ACCOUNT 
JULY 1, 1974 to JUNE 30, 1975 



Balance as of July 1, 1974 

Add: Cash Receipts 7/1/74 to 6/30/75 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures 7/1/74 to 6/30/75 
Balance on Hand 6/30/75 



Tax Collections : 

Personal Property, Levy 1973 

1974 
1974/75 

Real Estate, Levy 1973 

1974 
1974/75 
Betterments Added to Taxes : 

Water Assessments, Levy 1972 

1973 
1974/75 

Street Assessments, Levy 1974/75 
Water Liens Added to Taxes : 

Levy 1973 
1974 
1974/75 

Tax Titles 6e Possessions : 
Tax Titles 

Sale of Tax Possessions 
Pro -Forma Taxes 
Assessments Paid in Advance : 

Water 

Street 

Unapportioned Betterments - Paid in Full 
Sewer Betterments 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 



26.55 
1,150.95 
241,450.39 
28,649.12 
96,403.87 
7,096,633.39 



7.29 
182.82 
6.557.46 



459.33 
144.01 
16.619.42 

34,171.85 
14,250.00 



2,129.06 
5,071.16 



242,627.89 
7,221,686.38 



6,747.57 
9,973.18 



17,222.76 



48,421.85 
1,174.20 



7,200.22 
3,596.85 
9,889.17 



661,310.16 
26,837,158.91 
27,498,469.07 
26,557,555.41 

940,913.66 



7,568,540.07 



Short Term Loans : 

Highway, Chapter 81 
Long Term Loans : 

Street Betterment Bonds 

Water Betterment Bonds 

Improvements to Water System Bonds 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



68,210.00 
11,940.00 
500,000.00 



22,428.00 



580,150.00 



602,578.00 



120 



Federal Aid ; 
Schools : 

Federal Employment Act #PL874 
National Defense Education #PL85-864 
Reading Skills 
Head Start 

Consumer & Homemaking 
Public Grants : 

State Aid to Highways, Chp. 81 
Highway Fund, Chp. 825 
State Aid to Public Libraries 
Bicentennial Room, Library 
Education of Handicapped Children 
Veterans Services 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



10,704.00 
13,254.31 
65,879.00 
14,922.00 
28.656.00 



22,428.00 
43,232.00 
6,413.25 
4,208.00 
2,500.00 
25,962.35 



133,415.31 



104,743.60 



238,158.91 



School Lunch Program : 
State Reimbursements 
Program Receipts 

High School Athletic Assoc. 

Recreation Account 

Outside Detail Account 



REVOLVING FUNDS 

165,896.42 
225,620.80 



391,517.22 
9,252.00 
3,849.00 
66,211.58 



470,829.80 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Water Department : 

Water Rates 

Water Services 

Water Installations 

Industrial Fire Protection Rates 

Water Department Refunds 
Appropriation Refunds 

Veterans Aid, Settlements 

Veterans Aid, Reinbursements 
Refunds, Surplus Revenue 
Recording Fees 
Group Insurance Dividends 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Carter Lecture Fund, Reimbursement 
Perpetual Care Funds 
Accrued Interest, Sale of Bonds 
Premium, Sale of Bonds 



RESTRICTED RECEIPTS 



428,815.36 
3,010.62 
973.66 
14,307.63 
482.27 



13,940.43 



7,044.19 
588.50 



447,589,54 
54,228.05 

7,632.69 
2,903.53 
165.14 
1,131.00 
13,362.00 
968.50 
12,050.00 
1,362.77 
653.80 



555,987.45 



Short Term Investments 
Employees Deductions : 

Federal Withholding 

State Withholding 

Retirement System, Town 

Teachers 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Credit Union 

Union Dues 
Fish & Game Licenses for Commonwealth 
County Dog Licenses 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



1,155,908.65 
308,039.18 
128,180.15 
215,101.35 
113,586.29 
13,685.75 
4,023.04 
8,499.84 
28,749.58 
441,838.80 
31.583.66 



11,300,000.00 



2,449,196.29 
7,619.50 
5.102.85 



13,761,918.64 



121 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Schools, State Reimbursements 2,400,970.26 

Local Receipts 2,040.00 2,403,010.26 

Loss of Taxes 1,386.76 
Local Aid, Lottery Fund 114,178.17 
Beano Fund 650.29 
Motor Vehicle Excise Collections : 

Prior Levies 533,745.62 

Current Levies 179,535.36 713,280.98 

Farm Animal Excise 168.69 
Sewer Collections ; 

Rentals 55,486.23 

Sewer Leins 154.53 55,640.76 

Ambulance Collections 4,171.98 
Liquor Licenses 7,000.00 
Interests & Costs: 



Short Term Investments 108,395.47 

Tax Collections 15,737.46 

Water Demands 2,939.32 

Tax Titles Interest & Costs 6,230.01 

Betterment Interest on Paid In Full 59.51 133,361.77 

Municipal Receipts ; 

Selectmen 594.00 

Tax Collector 2,040.00 

Town Clerk 5,066.40 7,700.40 
Board of Assessors : 

Veterans Abatements, State 10,012.39 

Widows Abatements, State 10,412.50 20,424.89 

Police Department 4,214.00 

Civil Defense - Rescue Truck - State 7,666.68 
Building Inspector : 

Building Permits 12,848.00 

Wire Permits 4,605.50 

Plumbing Permits 1,293.00 

Gas Permits 1.412.00 20,158.50 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 440.00 

Engineering Department 178.00 
Highway Department : 

Sale of Junk & Obsolete Equipment 255.00 

State Highway Project #497 74,473.22 

State Highway, Chapter #81 37,589.47 112,317.69 

Cemetery Department 10,448.00 
Health & Sanitation ; 

Board of Health 3,799.50 

Visiting Nurse 502.50 

Sale of Dogs 313.00 

Drainlayer Permits 100.00 

Dog License Reimbursements 3 .472.56 8,187.56 

Sewer Inspection Fees 50.00 

Library Fines 98.27 

Recreation Department, State Reimbursement 7,112.76 

Insurance Reimbursements 3,944.40 
Court Fines : 

Fourth District Court 2,312.45 

Lowell District Court 10.00 2,322.45 

Division of Standards 69.00 

Advertising Charges 49.75 

Cablevision Fee 250.00 

Miscellaneous Receipts 52.00 

Rents - Harnden Tavern 168.00 

Conservation Commission Hearings 132.00 

New England Tel & Tel Commission 312.03 
TOTAL i<ECEIPTS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1974 to JUNE 30, 1975 



122 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE PERIOD 7/1/74 - 6/30/75 



Refunds : 

Personal Property taxes 

Real Estate Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Tax Title Recording Fees 

Street Betterments 

Water Betterments 

Ambulance Account 

Estimated Receipts 



88.50 
34,506.80 
6,068.17 
8.38 
202.96 
18.34 
139.76 
71.25 
712.56 



41,816.72 



Water Department: 
Rates 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Water Liens 
Assessments - State & County: 
County Hospital Tax 
County Tax 

County Retirement System 

State Recreation 

M. D. C. Sewer 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 

Metropolitan Air Pollution 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

M. B. T. A. Transit Authority 

Ipswich River Watershed District 
Legal Settlements 
Outside Details: 

Police Department 

Maintenance Dept. 

Miscellaneous Departments 
Water Department: 

Water Betterments - Brattle Street 
Jaquith Road 

Develop Salem Street Well Field 

Chestnut Street Well Field 

Improvements to the system 

Water System - Northeast Sector of Town 
Street Betterments : 

Betterments 1974/75 

Lexington, Cunningham & Morningside Sts. 
Mornings ide Street 
Employee Deductions: 
Withholding - Federal 
State 

Retirement - Town Employees 

School Teachers 
Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance - Teachers 
U. S, Bonds 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield - Town Employees 

Teachers 

Tax Sheltered Annuities - Teachers 
Credit Union 
Union Dues : 

Town Employees 

Police Department 

Fire Department 

Maintenance Department 

Teachers 



32,079.96 
355,880.70 
182,867.00 
76,860.15 
86,335.98 
2,297.85 
944.73 
1,847.03 
158,981.04 
487.10 



453.75 
425.25 



646.00 
2,679.71 
2,104.00 
2,568.00 
23,585.95 



572.15 
1,289.58 
85.48 



570,827.66 



327.753.88 



60,073.00 
5,995.33 
524.25 



879.00 
4,831.91 
4,604.06 
18,905.91 
161.173.42 

74.00 
15,904.33 
15,612.25 

1,155,908.65 
357,729.17 
137,853.18 
210,724.04 
4,119.49 
8,785.80 
13,685.75 
56,361.33 
46,817.62 
30,333.32 
441,838.80 



1,947.21 



898,581.54 
12,800.00 



66,592.58 



190,394.30 



31,590.58 



31,583.66 



2,495,740.81 



123 



Agency Accounts: 

County Dog Licenses 

State Fish & Game Licenses 

Recreation, Dedicated Accounts 

Tailings Account 
Premium, Sale of Bonds 
Federal Grants & Aids - Schools: 

Public Law #874 

lACP-World of Construction 

Consumer & Homemaking 

Title I, Reading Skills 

Title II, Library Extensions 

Education of the Handicapped 

Child Development, Kindergarten 

Head Start 
Special Education, Chapter #766 
School Lunch Program 
High School Athletic Association 
Cemetery Department : 

Trust Funds 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Carter Lecture Fund 
Wilmington Redevelopment Authority 
Short Term Investments 

Total Expenditures from General Accounts 



ANALYSIS OF THE ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



USED BY THE 


ASSESSORS IN SETTING 
WITH THE ACTUAL 1974 


THE 1975 TAX RATE 
RECEIPTS 








Used by the 










Assessors in 


Actual 


More 


Less 




Setting 1975 


Receipts 


than 


than 




Tax Rate 


1974 


Estimated 


Estimated 


Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 


696,731.42 


489,639.52 




207,091.90 


Licenses 


10,000.00 


2,000.00 




8,000.00 


Fines 


2,437.75 


1,200. 70 




1,237.05 


Special Assessments 


13,314.93 


23,962.89 


10,647.96 




General Government 


12,872.30 


7,606.60 




5,265.70 


Protection of Persons & Property 


37,359.00 


24,131.00 




13,228.00 


Heath & Sanitation 


7,503.25 


4,101.00 




3,402.25 


Highways 


2,485.41 


422.41 




2,063.00 


Schools, Local Receipts 




2,760.00 


2,760.00 




Libraries, Local Receipts 


1,539.50 


750.85 




788.65 


Recreation 


2,328.68 






2,328.68 


Cemeteries (Other than Trust Funds 










& Sale of Lots) 


12,442.00 


9,141.00 




3,301.00 


Interests 


81,891.70 


126,930.83 


45,039.13 




Farm Animal Excise 


236.33 


257.69 


21.36 




Ambulance Service 


6,822.40 


4,307.13. 




2,515.27 


Sewer Revenue 


100,062.01 


53,804.13 




46,257.88 


Miscellaneous Receipts 


2,878.32 


983.86 




1,894.46 


Workmen's Comp. & Insurance Reimbursement 


18,386.50 


5,504.82 




12,881.68 


Dog License Reimbursements 


6,386.30 


3,648.12 




2,738.18 


State Census Reimbursements 


4,312.75 






4,312.75 


Matching Funds (C. D. Rescue Truck) 




7,666.68 


7,666.68 






$1,019,990.55 


768,819.23 


66,135.13 


317,306.45 



121+ 



5,334.80 
8,060.75 
3,734.18 
152.75 



29,773.51 
7,389.81 
4,421.78 

55,311.01 
9,209.20 
2,452.35 
7,522.14 

11,461.00 



12,500.00 
60.00 



17,282.48 
653.80 



127,540.80 
1,953.21 

367,076.36 
7,390.81 



12,560.00 
484.58 
5,000.00 
11.675.000.00 

$15.954.405.78 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
DETAIL OF REVENUE SHARING 
JULY 1. 1974 to JUNE 30, 1975 



Federal Grants 



Interest Reed, 
on Investments 



Expended 



Balance on 
Hand 



Balance on hand July 1, 1974 



$125,822.01 Cash in Bank 

250,000.00 Invested 
$375,822.01 



Received 7/1/74 through 6/30/75 



$471,011.00 



32,442.92 



690,318.62 



Balance on hand 6/30/75 



38,957.31 Cash in Bank 
150,000.00 Invested 
$188,957.31 



Expenditures 

Police Salaries 
Fire Salaries 
Town Dimp 

Garbage Collection 
Library Salaries 
Library Expenses 



287,186.31 
248,689.90 
35,000.00 
25,000.00 
45,561.03 
48,881.38 
$690,318.62 



"I certify that this is a true extract 
of the Revenue Sharing Funds of the 
Town of Wilmington, Mass." 



Robert H. Peters 
Town Accountant 



125 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30. 1975 



Cash 

Short Term Investments 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected : 
Prior Levies : 

Personal Property Taxes 1972 
1973 
1974 

Real Estate Taxes 1972 
1973 
1974 

Personal Property Taxes 

in Litigation 1969 
Real Estate Taxes in 
Litigation 1973 
Current Levies : 

Personal Property Taxes 
Real Estate Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes : 
Prior Levies: 
Levy 1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
Current Levy 
Tax Titles & Possessions : 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 
Tax Title Recording Fees 
Assessments Added to Taxes : 
Street Assessments 1973 

1974/75 
In Litigation 1972 
1973 

Committed Street Interest 1973 

1974/75 

In Litigation 1973 
Water Assessments 1973 

1974/75 

Committed Water Interest 1973 

1974/75 

Unapportioned Water Assessments 
Accounts Receivables : 
Water Department: 

Rates 

Services 

Water Installations 
Fire Protection Rates 
Water Liens 1973 

1974/75 

Sewer Rates 
Ambulance Account 
State Aid to Highways 
County Aid to Highways 

Unprovided for Accounts : 
Overlay Deficits: 
Levy 1972 
1973 
1974 
1974/75 
Legal Settlements 
Underestimates - Assessments 

Metro Area Planning Council 1974 
Loans Authorized 
Revenue 1976 

TOTAL ASSETS 



ASSETS 

940,913.66 
1,500,000.00 

450.00 2,441,363.66 



174.20 
563.45 
253.71 
26.00 
31,069.00 
38,463.62 



70,549.98 

462.00 

908.60 

2,812.71 
168,873.66 



71,920.58 
171,686.37 



243,606.95 



347.20 
3,015.24 
6,319.96 
25,957.24 
57.489.98 



74.78 
147.33 
85.61 
55.80 
74.77 
110.36 
42.40 
259.81 
479.49 
108.64 
205.90 



93,129.62 
95,483.21 

38,516.68 
74,791.29 



363.52 

227.53 
739.30 
314.54 



188,612.83 



113,307.97 
10.00 



1,644.89 
5,215.61 



40,474.76 
605.10 
162.84 
1,600.00 

550.69 

1,806.65 2.357.34 



151,582.67 
26.455.18 



45,200.04 
1,294.51 
6,359.00 

178,037.85 



122.20 
3,588.91 
9,041.73 
119,374.44 132,127.28 
12,800.00 

992.48 145,919.76 
7,266,000.00 
11.262.475.00 

$ 21.899.048.07 



126 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1975 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 

Temporary Loans 22,428.00 

Outside Details, Wilmington Housing Authority 30.00 

Employee Payroll Deductions : 

Teacher's Retirement 52,094.47 

Group Insurance Deductions 500.34 

Washington Natl. Insurance Deductions 1,141.84 
Blue Cross - Town Employees 8,765.76 

Teachers 17.069.88 25,835.64 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 4,259.81 83,832.10 

Agency Accounts : 

County Dog Licenses 1,542.50 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 14,029.80 15,572.30 
Revolving Funds : 

School Lunch Program 62,892.19 

High School Athletic Association 8,012.96 

Recreation Dedicated Account 45.82 70,950.97 

Group Insurance Dividend 1,131.00 

Road Machinery Fund Account 9,984.00 
Federal Grants & Aids : 

Reading Skills, Title #1 17,254.66 

Bureau of Library Extensions 204.46 

Consumer & Homemaking 323.22 

Education of Handicapped Children 47.65 

Education Curriculum, NDEA 7,201.54 

Head Start 11,461.00 

World of Construction, Title #11 110.19 

Child Development, Kindergarten 8,888.86 

Public Law #874 84,512.16 

#85-864 68.522.33 198,526.07 

Special Education, Chp. #766 36,046.79 

State Aid to Public Libraries 6,413.50 
Overestimates, State & County Assessments : 

County Tax 40,478.44 

State Recreation 759.59 

M.D.C. Sewer 1974 4,175.27 

Metro. Air Pollution Control 89.37 

Mass. Bay Transit Authority 1,508.96 

Ipswich River Watershed District 16.80 47,028.43 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 1,130.55 
Revenue Reserved until collected : 

Motor Vehicle Excise Revenue 188,612.83 

Special Assessments Revenue 6,676.67 

Tax Titles & Possession Revenue 113,307.97 

Departmental Revenue 6,359.00 

Water Revenue 45,200.04 

Sewer Revenue 1,294.51 

State & County Aid to Highway Revenue 185,237.77 

Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 450.00 547,138.79 
Appropriation Balances : 

Town Treasurer, Expenses 16.05 

Tax Title Foreclosures 975.17 991.22 

Planning Board, Expenses 9,165.00 

Police Department, Expenses 16.50 

Civil Defense 1,290.94 
Building Inspector, Personal Services 2,677.52 

Expenses 700.00 3,377.52 



127 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Appropriation Balances : (continued) 
Highway Department, Sidewalks 
Gypsy Moth, Expenses 
Public Street Lights 
Installation of Traffic Lights 
Cemetery Department , Expenses 
Board of Health, Personal Services 

Expenses 
Veterans Benefits, Aid 
School Department 

School Maintenance Dept . , Roof Repairs 

Permanent Building Committee, Expenses 

Bonds & Insurance 

Historical Commission Expenses 

Purchase of Cub Tractor, Cemetery Department 

1974 Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 

Fire & Water Rescue Equipment 

Veterans Retirement 

Bicentennial Commission 

Microfilming & Reader 

Special Counsel 

Block Grant for Law Enforcement 
Engineering & Title Search Town Owned Land 
Chapter 90 Construction Project - 1967 

1968 
1969 
1972 
1973 
1974/75 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 1974/75 
Memorial Library Bicentennial Room 
Section 3 Alderwood Estates for Conservation 
Historical Preservation Rounds Property 
Andover Street 

Cause & Solution Dirty Water Problems 
Surveys & Engineering Studies, Additional 

Land Fill Sites 
Acquisition of Land for Sanitary Land 

Fill Sites 

Acquire Land for School Projects, Salem St. 
Tennis Courts - Glen Road School 

Shawsheen Ave. School 

Wildwood St, School 

Woburn St. School 
Installation of Lights - Shawsheen St. School 

No. Intermediate School 

Non-Revenue Accounts : 

Woburn Street School Construction 
Woburn Street School Addition 
Shawsheen Ave. School Construction 
Preliminary Plans, New High School 
West Intermediate School Const. 
Wilmington Memorial Library 
Relocate Shawsheen Ave. Bridge 
Sewer Construction Grants 
Water Betterments - 

Brattle Street 

Jaquith Road 
Oakwood Rd., Reading Ave., Maple Rd., Davis Rd. 
Develop Salem St. Well Field 
Water Betterment - Lake Street 



6,951.98 
15.000.00 

1,814,80 
18.95 



9,000.00 
9,000.00 
9,450.00 
9,450,00 
9,450.00 
9,450.00 
2,500,00 



119,42 
381.27 
402,01 
1,728,94 
1,216.51 
1,322.38 



23,740.50 
10.27 

21,951.98 
2,005,00 

1,833,75 
9,002.14 
138,247.33 
1,719.55 
24,076.76 
5,000.00 
1,303.13 

237.50 
11,545.25 

193.00 
1,286.58 

833,79 
1,100.00 
4,286.90 
4,700.00 
4,896,38 



818.77 
2,398.50 
4,952.75 



58,300,00 
9,208,00 

20,523.89 
1,303.00 
1,480.34 
2,228.60 

3,000.94 

5,550.00 
2,815,53 



2,631.64 

2,538,89 

3,339.19 
9,156.61 

43,938.14 
3,000.00 
9,747.22 

40,410.41 
3,000.00 
102,750.78 



8,170.02 
45,438.59 
178,80 



382,391,82 



128 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Non-Revenue Accounts : (continued) 
Prepare Plans & Specifications for 

Improvements to Water System 
Water Distribution System, Northeast Sector 
Main Street Well Field & Station 
Construct Permanent Pumping Station, Town Park 
Street Betterments : 
Ferguson Road 

Lexington, Cunningham & Morningside Drive 
Mornings ide Drive 
Relocate Grove Ave. 

Layout of Industrial & Progress Ways 

Accept as Town Way - Scaltritio Drive 

West Street Betterment 

Esquire Estates Completion 

Wilmington Redevelopment Authority 
Loans Authorized & Unissued 
Appropriation Control 1976 
Water Available Surplus 
Surplus Revenue 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



4,876.68 
12,003.82 
5,983.87 



6,094.09 
338,841.33 
2,449.89 
14,152.97 



22,864.37 
9,054.01 
400.00 
100.00 
2,172.87 
2,721.28 
23,786.41 



691,766.98 
7,266,000.00 
12,087,868.00 
87,108.88 
343,699.89 

$ 21,899,048.07 




REPORT OF DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES FOR 1974-1975 



SELECTMEN 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Town Meeting Expenses 
Supplies Office 



TOWN TREASURER 

2,250.00 Salary Administrative Asst. 

2,582.49 Salary Other 

1,938.81 Repairs & Maintenance 

1,539.75 Misc. Services 

157.29 Supplies Other 

8,468.34 Tax Title Foreclosures 



14,822.30 
9,338.46 
154.13 
192.00 
1,540.06 
14,024.83 
40,071.78 



ELECTIONS 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



TOWN COLLECTOR 
11,263.74 Salary Town Collector 

603.00 Salaries Other 

8,861.19 Printing Adv. & Binding 

683.17 Misc. Services 

21,411.10 Supplies, Office 



12,234.77 
9,338.46 
529.81 
3,982.73 
659.97 
26,745.74 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 
Salaries 

Misc. Contr. Services 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Supplies Office 



TOWN CLERK 
5,343.29 Salary Town Clerk 

1,042.00 Salaries Other 

3,682.28 Printing Adv. & Binding 

71 . 23 Misc. Services 

10,138.80 Supplies Office 

Outlay 



12,316.17 
9,610.86 
-0- 
258.86 
292.13 
918.00 
23,396.02 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 



ASSESSORS 

395.98 Salary Principal Assessor 

3,475.00 Salaries Other 

314.11 Printing Adv. & Binding 

34.04 Misc. Services 

4,219.13 Supplies Office 



19,470.43 
15,102.82 
28.00 
2,077.95 
705.34 
37,384.54 



TOWN MANAGER 

Salary Town Manager 
Salaries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



COMMUNITY & ECONOMICAL DEVELOPMENT 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Salary Town Accountant 
Salaries Other 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



26,988.58 
10,080.77 
88.00 
495.55 
513.28 
38,166.18 



-0- 

319.17 
319.17 



15,946.24 
9,676.66 
22.50 
527.50 
26,172.90 



TOM COUNSEL 

Personal Services 
Contr. Services 



TOWN HALL 
Salaries 

Misc. Contr. Services 
Data Processing Payrolls 
Postage 

Supplies Office 



PLANNING BOARD 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 
Professional Services 
Supplies Office 



10,000.00 
7.500.00 
17,500.00 



15,624.08 
4,096.98 
5,460.70 
5,535.26 
1.964.67 

32,681.69 



1,691.24 
2,329.36 

17,497.45 
265.00 

21,783.05 



130 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Salary Chief 
Salary Lieutenant 
Salary Sergeants 
Salary Patrolmen 
Salary Traffic Supervisors 
Salary Clerk 
Salary Extra Detail 
Salary Vacation 
Salary Sick Leave 
Salary Paid Holiday 
Salary Police Dog Officer 
Subs. Dues & Misc. Services 
Maint. of Dogs 
Clothing & Rubber Goods 
Supplies Office 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



25,865.20 


Salary Building Inspector 


16,421.49 


Salaries Other 


82,349.24 


Printing Ad. & Binding 


300.839.03 


Dues & Subscriptions 


37,100.40 


Misc. Contr. Services 


15,582.88 


Supplies Office 


24,000.00 


Small Tools & Equipment 


30,000.00 




19,940.42 




15,916.82 




800.00 


BOARD OF APPEALS 


887.33 


Salaries 


1,004.95 


Printing Adv. & Binding 


11,469.64 


Misc. Services 


3,184.38 


Supplies Office 


2,743.93 




879.48 




588,985.19 





SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 







Salary 


FIRE DEPARTMENT 




Small Tools & Equipment 


Salary Chief 


25,865.20 




Salary Deputy Chief 


16,190.36 




Salary Lieutenants 


55,618.42 




Salary Privates 


288,225.70 




Salary Call Fire & Ambulance 


14,000.00 


TOWN ENGINEER 


Salary Vacations 


29,252.25 


Salary Town Engineer 


Salary Sick Leave 


18,500.00 


Salaries Other 


Salary Paid Holidays 


14,625.00 


Misc. Contr. Services 


Fire Alarm Maint. 


2,409.58 


Supplies Office 


Repairs Radio 


572.12 


Small Tools & Equipment 


Misc. Services 


1,128.02 


Outlay 


Clothing and Rubber Goods 


3,439.26 




Supplies Office 


265.40 




Small Tools & Equipment 


2,481.48 




Outlay & Fire Alarm Construction 


3,880.90 


HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 


476,453.69 


Salary Superintendent 
Salaries & Wages Other 
Repairs & Maint. Police 



CIVIL DEFENSE 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 
Utilities 
Transportation 
Supplies Office 
Small Tools & Equip. 
Outlay 



CONSTABLE 



DOG OFFICER 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 



1,829.79 
950.00 
200.35 
104.80 
17.76 
163.13 
599.95 

3,865.78 



100.00 



3,840.00 
1,943.25 
5,783.25 



Repairs & Maint. Fire Department 
Repairs & Maint. Engineering Dept. 
Repairs & Maint. Tree Dept. 
Repairs & Maint. Cemetery Dept. 
Repairs & Maint. Public Buildings Dept 
Repairs & Maint. Assessors 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Clothing & Rubber Goods 
Chemicals 
Gasoline & 
Gasoline 
Gasoline 
Gasoline 
Gasoline 
Gasoline 



Oil 
Oil 
Oil 
Oil 
Oil 
Oil 

Supplies Construction 

Supplies Office 

Small Tools & Equipment 

Outlay 

Sidewalks 

Drainage 



Police 
Fire 

Engineer 
Tree 

Cemetery 
Public Buildings 



14,118.53 
7,590.10 
131.00 
216.00 
887.40 
395.98 
30.27 
23,369.28 



770.06 

-0- 

74.50 
160.44 
1,005.00 



1,375.00 
15.95 
1,390.95 



19,875.00 
38,517,15 
552.60 
1,109.29 
336.56 
7,516.00 
67,906.60 



18,444.54 
196,414.65 
12,210.73 
5,563.43 
607.13 
1,021.38 
2,509.52 
. 1,161.19 
104.17 
13,269.69 
1,163.20 
-0- 
17,319.65 
3,894.35 
392.02 
2,371.68 
1,195.48 
2,605.15 
46,352.87 
87.53 
22,256.28 
3,244.00 
43,787.66 
41,536.81 
437,513.11 



131 



ROAD MACHINERY 
Repairs & Maint, 
Gasoline & Oil 



CHAPTER 81 
Salaries 

Supplies Construction 



SNOW & ICE CONTROL 

Salaries 
Repairs & Maint. 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Gasoline & Oil 
Salt & Sand 

Small Tools & Equipment 



TREE WARDEN 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 
Chemicals 
Trees 

Small Tools & Equipment 



DUTCH ELM CONTROL 
Salaries 
Chemicals 

Small Tools & Equipment 



GYPSY MOTH CONTROL 
Salaries 
Chemicals 

Small Tools & Equipment 



PUBLIC STREET LIGHTS 



PARK DEPARTMENT 
Salaries 

Maint. & Supplies 
Outlay 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 
Salary Superintendent 
Salaries Other 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Liners 

Supplies Care of Grounds 
Supplies Construction 
Supplies Office 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay, Equipment 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

20,579.10 Salaries & Wages 152,427.85 

14.377.72 Repairs & Maintenance 6,257.37 

34,956.82 Misc. Contr. Services 33,616.95 

Public Utilities 62,777.04 

Transportation 605.00 

12,837.60 Gasoline & Oil 9,495.93 

16.131.46 Meters & Meter Parts 5,585.09 

28,969.06 Pipes & Fittlings 7,406.90 

Supplies Construction 2,137.47 

Supplies Office 4,833.45 

Supplies Plant ' 7,254.64 

48,151.84 Outlay Equipment 1.214.93 

2.971.12 293,612.62 
17,501.19 
9,794.53 
32,326.77 
1.504.55 



112,250.00 BOARD OF HEALTH 

Salary Director 16,793.04 

Salaries Other 25,398.73 

22,548.44 Printing Adv. & Binding 229.00 

938.86 Clinic Expenses 529.33 

2,575.15 Hospital & Medical 4,585.96 

2,491.00 Misc. Contr. Services 292.14 

968.49 Supplies Office 523.75 

29,521.94 Drug Dependency Problems 11,245.71 

Mental Health 15,316.43 

Lowell Mental Health 2,499.96 

15,000.00 Garbage Collection 41,900.00 

2,251.25 Town Dump 65.000.00 

312.27 184,314.05 

17,563.52 



11,560.00 
2,139.45 VETERANS SERVICES 

^^♦02 Salary Agent 2,645.00 

13,740.47 Salary Other 7,161.75 

Misc. Contr. Services 167.58 

Supplies Office 197.74 

76,071.44 Veterans' Aid 72.204.33 

82,376.40 



4,753.36 
1,332.56 

4.342.80 SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

10,428.72 Salaries 4,723,596.47 

Expenses 1.053.372.97 

5,776,969.44 

13,412.80 
47,430.13 

9,471.17 

1,690.00 

657.60 VOCATIONAL TRAINING 

2,689.86 Tuition 4,624.60 

261.61 Transportation 350.00 
993.35 4,974.60 

5,332.69 
81,939.21 



132 



SCHOOL MAINTENANCE 




CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




Salary Superintendent 


16, 322. 10 


Salaries 


971.47 


Salaries Other 


492,661.47 


Dues & Subscriptions 


73.50 


Repairs & Maintenance 


Z/ , /io.UU 


Engineering Services 


92, 65 


Misc. Contr. Services 


14,308.77 


Jr. Conservation Camp 


300.00 


Vandalism 




Trees & Shrubs 


894.99 


Rubbish Collection 


£ o *7 c 


Supplies Office 


86.78 


Uniforms 


o , iUi .(jy 


Misc. Materials 


333, 52 


Kitchen Repairs 


c o / o c c 

5 , 34 i . 5 5 


Purchase Land & Land Improvement 


380.00 


Fuel Heating 


TOO OOC OO 

138,225.38 




3,132.91 


Oil Burner Repairs 


9,774.62 






Supplies Plant 


O O IOC c c 

28,135.55 






Small Tools & Equipment 








Roof Repairs 


o O A o O A ri 

ZO,HJJ.A-U 


HISTORICAL COMMISSION 




Outlay 


24,706.70 


Personal Services 


343.75 




810,822.86 


Professional Services 


39 . 19 






Supplies Office 


21.68 






Misc. Materials 


36.00 








440.62 


SCHOOL GROUNDS MAINTENANCE 








Repairs & Maint. 


2,663.97 






Supplies Care of Grounds 


6,589 .29 






Small Tools & Equipment 


43.58 


UNCLASSIFIED 




Outlay 


7,300.00 


Reserve Fund 


41,993.14 




16,596.84 


Bonds & Insurance 


90,223.61 






Town Report 


2,296.40 






Local Transportation 








Selectmen 


500.00 


MAINTENANCE OF TOWN BUILDINGS 




Town Manager 


21.40 


Repairs & Maint. 


3,763.20 


Asst. Town Manager 


71.80 


Public Utilities 


67 , 201 .72 


Accountant 


50.00 


Outlay 


11,741.72 


Treasurer 


13.10 




82,706.64 


Collector 


14.60 






Town Clerk 


42.50 






Planning Board 


363.70 






Police 




PUBLIC LIBRARY 




Chief 


600 . 00 


Salary Director 


15,847.00 


Traffic Supervisor 


150.00 


Salaries Other 


75,096.03 


Dog Officer 


930.60 


Misc. Services 


822.95 


Building Inspector 


264.97 


Programs & Activities 


350.00 


Cemetery 


535.00 


Supplies Library 


47,625.30 


Board of Health 




Supplies Office 


9,525.25 


Board 


165.90 


Outlay 


1,283.93 


Nurses 


451.20 




150,550.46 


Veterans Agent 


540 . 80 






Public Buildings 


722.20 






Library 


62.65 






Recreation 


7.10 


RECREATION 




Misc. 


143. oU 


Salary Director 


14,769.29 


Training & Conferences In State 




Salaries Other 


68,772.49 


Selectmen 


1,040.60 


Misc. Services 


9,393.93 


Town Manager 


304.84 


Community Youth Program 


15,422.98 


Asst. Town Manager 


97.55 


Supplies Office 


525.00 


Treasurer 


31.30 


Supplies Playground & Beach 


6,550.00 


Collector 


36.30 




115,433.69 


Town Clerk 


257.70 






Assessors 


640.00 






Planning Board 


135.55 


PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 




Police Dept. 




Salaries 


1,807.50 


Chief 


83.00 


Engineering Services 


12,738.94 


Others 


216.00 


Supplies Office 


60.77 


Schools 


949.67 



14,607.21 



133 



UNCLASSIFIED (continued) 

Training & Conference In State (continued) 
Fire Dept. 

Chief 14.00 

Deputy Chief 45.50 

Schools 4,007.54 

Building Inspector 218.53 

Tree Department 27.50 

Building Superintendent 52.27 

Veterans Agent 151.50 
Board of Health 

Agent 12.85 

Board Members 44.70 

Nurses 22.55 

Library 39.60 

Recreation 501.86 

Acct. Clerk 5.00 
Training & Conferences Out of State 

Town Manager 830.00 

Assessor 635.00 

Public Bldg. Supt. 175.00 

Library 250.00 

Recreation 104.50 

Board of Health 95.00 

Lease of Quarters 1,500.00 

Beautif ication Committee 3,000.00 

Blue Cross & Insurance 81,361.23 

Memorial & Veterans Day 1,993.65 

Council on Aging 11,120.79 

Appraisals 9,140.00 

Cause & Solution of Dirty Water Prob. 5,289.52 

Outlay Police Cruisers 22,143.92 

Outlay Civil Defense Rescue Tool 4,100.00 

Outlay Highway Dump Truck 10,107.00 

Outlay Highway Chassis & Cab 8,962.00 

Outlay Highway Pickup Truck 3,686.00 

Outlay Highway Sander Body 3,690.00 

Outlay Tree Brush Chipper 5,485.00 

Outlay Cemetery Tractor 6,669.85 

Outlay Cemetery Cub Tractor 2,145.00 

Outlay Maint. Pickup Truck 2,980.00 

Regional Vocational School 267,909.00 
Compensate Employees Unused Sick Leave 13,935.00 

1974/75 Salary Adj. & Addl. Costs 243,284.75 

Additional Employees Public Buildings 465.36 

Additional Employees Town Manager 11,523.04 

Career Incentive Pay/Police 3,000.00 

Career Incentive Pay/Fire 1,817.65 

Fire/Water Rescue Equipment 4,306.33 

Martin Luther King Holiday 3,881.37 

Engineering Study/Land Fill Site 24,125.75 

Veterans Retirement 15,213.42 

Special Counsel 713.10 



UNCLASSIFIED (Continued) 
Bicentennial Commission 
Block Grant Law Enforcement 

Assistance Act. 
Appollo Park Protective Measures 
Microfilming & Reader 



MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 
Schools 

General Government 

Water 

Sewer 

Interest on Anticipation Notes & 
Authentication Fees 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTS 

Preliminary Plans New High School 
Water Betterments: 

Brattle Street 

Jaquith Road 
Salem St. Well Field 
Chestnut St. Well Field 
Prepare Plans & Specifications 

for Improvements to System 
Water Distribution System-Northeast 

Sector of Town 
Street Betterment 

1974 

Lexington St. 

Momingside Drive 
Relocate Grove Ave. 
Layout: Industrial Way 

Progress Way 
Wilmington Redevelopment Authority 



6,166.21 

300.00 
2,434.99 
2,366.03 
936,005.84 



574,061.90 
90,324.73 
87,138.49 
52,340.00 

18. $81. 42 
822,446.54 



10,000.00 

4,876.23 
3,846.50 
4,831.91 
4,604.06 

18,905.91 

161,158.67 

74.00 
27,496.18 
26,316.13 
945.99 

300.00 
5.005.52 
268,361.10 



13U 



ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING 



DEBT 



INSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 
Wilmington Memorial Library 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $485,000 
Nichols Street Bridge Loan 

G/L 44, Sec. 7, $31,600 
West Street Construction Bonds 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $35,100 
Sewer Main Bonds (1971) 

G/L 44, Sec. 8, $275,000 
Sewer Main Bonds (1973) 

G/L 44, Sec. 8, $264,000 
Street Construction Bonds (1971) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $64,505 
Urban Renewal Bonds (1971) 

G/L 212B, Sec. 20 $200,000 
Acquired Land School Purposes (1972) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $61,800 
Street Construction Bonds (1974/75) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $68,210 



OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 

Add. & Alter. Jr/Sr High School 

Acts 645/48, $1,375,000 
Add. & Alter. Jr/Sr High School 

Acts 645/48, $400,000 
Glen Road School 

Acts 645/48, $450,000 
Boutwell Street School 

Acts 645/48, $400,000 
North Intermediate School 

Acts 645/48, $1,050,000 
Various School Projects 

Acts 645/48, $68,425 
Wobum Street School 

Acts 645/48, $597,000 
Wobum Street School Addition 

Acts 645/48, $660,000 
West Intermediate School 

Acts 645/48, $1,445,000 
Shawsheen Avenue School 

Acts 645/48, $1,674,720 
Shawsheen Ave. School (2nd Issue) 

Acts 645/48, $100,000 
Water Main Bonds (1962) 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $86,000 
Water Main Bonds, New Well Field 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $463,529 
Salem Street Well Field 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $56,750 
Salem Street Well Field & Mains 

Chp. 44, Sec 8, $320,000 
Water Main Bonds (1974/75) 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $11,940 
Improv. System N. E. Sector 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $500,000 



COMBINED TOTALS 



Balances 
7/1/74 

335,000 

1,100 

14,200 
230,000 
245,000 

25,802 
160,000 

49,440 

1,060,542 

100,000 
80,000 
80,000 
120,000 
385,000 
13,000 
292,000 
415,000 
770,000 
1,100,000 
60,000 
20,000 
210,000 
11,350 
220,000 



Added 
1974/75 



68,210 
68,210 



3,876,350 
4,936,892 



11,940 
500,000 

511,940 
580,150 



Paid-Off 
1974/75 

25,000 

1,100 
7,300 
15,000 
15,000 
12,901 
20,000 
12,360 
-0- 
108,661 

65,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
55,000 

5,000 
30,000 
35,000 
75,000 
110,000 
10,000 

5,000 
30,000 
11,350 
20,000 

-0- 

-0- 

511,350 
620.011 



Balances 
6/30/75 

310,000 

-0- 

6,900 

215,000 

230,000 

12,901 

140 ,000 

37,080 

68,210 

1,020,091 

35,000 
60,000 
60,000 
100,000 
330,000 
8,000 
262,000 
380,000 
695,000 
990,000 
50,000 
15,000 
180,000 

-0- 
200,000 
11,940 
500,000 

3,876,940 
4,897,031 



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FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



32 BootwiBll School 

33 Buzzell School 
35 Center School 

37 Glen Rd School 

38 High School 

41 Mildred Rogers School 

42 Nonh Intermediate 

School 

43 West School 

44 Swam School 

46 Walker School 

47 West Intermediate School 

48 West School 

49 Showsheen School 
51 Whitefleld School 

53 Wlldwood School 

54 Woburn Street School 

121 Main & Church Sts. 

122 Mfiln & Middlesex Ave 
1222 Carr Fastener 

123 Mam & Clark Sts 

124 Washington Ave 

125 Wilmington Plaza 

126 Mam St & Bridge Lane 

127 Brand Ave & Wiser St 

128 Baker St & Taplm Ave 

129 Phillips Ave & Wiser St 

131 Hobson Ave & Miles St 

132 Mam St & 

Massachusetts Ave 

1 33 Massachusetts Ave & 

River St 

134 Mam & Harnden Sts 

135 Si Dorothy s Church 
1 36 Veranda Ave 

137 Mam St & Grove Ave 

138 Grove & Wild Aves 

1 39 Grove Ave & BurnapSt 

141 Grove Ave & Lake St 

142 Mam St & Glen Rd 

143 Main & Lake Sts 

144 Lake St & Warren Rd 

146 Mam & Davis Sts 

147 Fairfield Ave 

148 Mariorie Rd 

149 Mam St at Tewksburv 

Line 

211 Burlington & Floradale 

Aves 

21 1 1 Diamond Crystal Salt 

Company 

2112 Sweetheart Plastic Corp 

212 Burlington Ave & 

Harris St 

213 Cedar St & Burt Rd 

214 Deming Way (Old Age 

Housing) 

215 Burlington Ave & 

Chestnut St 

216 Chestnut St & 

Butters Row 
21 7 Chestnut St & Mill Rd 

218 Chestnut St & 

Hillside Way 

219 Hillside Way at 

Burlington Line 

221 Chestnut St near 

GoU Club 

222 Chestnut St at Woburn 

Line 

223 Marion & Day Sts 

224 Marion & Clifton Sts 

225 Marion St to 

Chestnut St 

226 Roberts Road 

227 Burlington Ave & 

Boutwell St 

228 Boutwell St & Taft Rd 

229 Taft & Swain Rds 

231 Roosevelt Rd 

232 Burlington Ave & 

Dell Drive 

233 Burlington Ave & 

Swain Rd 

234 Beech St 



235 Burlir>gto<i Ave & 

Forest St 

236 Burlington Ave at 

Burlington Line 

237 Forest St & Congress St 

238 Forest St & 

Randolph Rd 

239 Forest St & 

Cochrane Rd 

241 Elwood Rd 

242 Forest St & 

Edwards Rd 

251 Shawsheen Ave & 

Canal St 

252 Canal St & Burt Rd 

253 Grand St 

254 Nassau Ave & 

Dunton Rd 

255 Shawsheen Ave & 

Carter Lane 

256 Carter Lane 

Norfolk St 

257 Amherst Rd 

258 Auburn Ave 
269 Ferguson Rd 

261 Shawsheen Ave & 

Aldrich Rd 

262 Aldrich Rd & 

Hardin St 

263 Aldrich Rd & 

Kendall St 

264 Aldrich Rd & 

Boutwell St 

265 Aldrich Rd & Forest St 

266 Winston Ave 

267 Aldrich Rd at 

Billerica Line 

268 Shawsheen Ave near 

Cranberry Bog 

269 Wilton Drive 

271 Shawsheen Ave & 
Bond St 

273 Shawsheen Ave & 

Hopkins St 

274 Hopkins & Columbia 

Streets 

275 Hopkins & Dorchester 

Streets 

276 Hopkins St at 

Billerica Line 

277 Shawsheen Ave & 

Nichols St 

278 Nichols St & 

Fairmeadow Rd 

279 Fairmeadow & 

Jere Rds 

281 Nichols St at 

Billerica Line 

282 Shawsheen Ave at 

Billerica Line 
31 1 Mam St & Dublin Ave 

312 Main & Lowell Sts 
3121 Hayden Mica Co 

313 Mam St & Butlers Row 

314 Mam St at Town Park 
3142 Brewsters 

315 Mam & Eames Sts 

316 Eames St, 

3132 Polyvinyl Chemical 

3161 J W Gi'eer Co 

3162 National Polychemical 

Co , Inc 

3163 Dragon Cement Co 

3164 Raffi & Swanson Inc 

317 Cook Ave 

318 Main St. at Woburn Line 

321 Lowell & Parker Sis. 
3211 Parker & Laurel St 

322 Parker & Blackslona Sis. 
3223 Allen Park Drive 

3222 Allen Park & Sheldon St. 

323 Lowell & Cross Sts. 

324 Lowell & Bay Sts. 
3241 Avco Corp 

325 Lowell & Woburn Sts 

326 Woburn & Elm Sts 

3261 Stepan Chemical 



327 Woborn St & 

Brentwood Ava 

328 Wobom St & 

Morse Ave 

329 Woburn & E wnas Sis. 

3291 Terrell Corp 

3292 Int. Salt 

3293 NAPA 

3294 Ritter Trucking 
3295 Nova Devices 

331 Woburn St & 

Industrial Way 
3313 Commodity Warehouse 
3314 Market Forge 
3316 Smithcraft 
3316 Crusader Paper Co. 

332 Strout Ave 

333 Lowell St & 

Woodland Rd 

334 Lowell & West Sts 

335 West St & Westdale 

Avenue 

336 Ayorte St & Crest 

Avenue 

337 Nickerson Ave 

338 West St & 

Suncrest Ave 

339 Suncrest Ave & 

Meadow Lane 

341 West St & Industrial Way 
341 2 Compugraphics 

3413 Scully Signal 
3415 Ling Electronics 
3417 ADS 

342 Lowell St . Rte 93 

and Reading L ine 
41 1 Church St , Fire Station 
41 2 Church & Columbia Sts 

413 Church & Beacon Sts 

414 Beacon St & 

Belmont Ave 

415 State St & 

Fairview Ave 

416 Church & Clark Sts 

417 Methodist Church 

418 Church St & 

Thurston Ave 

419 Church & Adams Sts 

421 Chandler & Kelley Rds 

422 Adams St E xt 

423 Church St & 

Middlesex Ave 

4231 New Library 

4232 Baptist Church 

424 Middlesex Ave & 

Adelaide St 
426 Middlesex Ave & 
Clark St 

426 Clark St & 

Railroad Ave 

427 Middlesex Ave & 

Adams St 

428 St Thomas' Church 
4281 Villanova Hall 

429 Midtftesex Ave & 

School St 

431 School St & Drury Lane 

432 Drury Lane & Loumac Rd 

433 Powderhouse Circle 

434 Middlesex Ave & 

Wlldwood St 
436 Wlldwood St near 
Cemetery 

436 Wlldwood St near 

Vets Housing 

437 Wlldwood & Woburn 

Streets 

438 Wing Rd 

51 1 Middlesex Ave & 

Glen Rd 

512 Glendale Circle 

513 Glen Rd & 

Lawrence St 

514 Lawrence St & 
Lawrence Ct 



515 Lawrerice St. A 

Hamlin Lane 

516 Glen Rd at 

R R Crossing 

517 Glen Rd & Fay St 
518GI«n Rd a KingSt. 
519 King St & Garden 

Ave 

521 King & Kilby Sts. 

522 King & Broad Sts. 

523 Glen Rd & Cypress St. 

524 Glen Rd & Brattle St. 

525 Glen Rd. & Harnden St. 

526 Glen & Miller Rds 

527 Faulkner & Beeching 

Aves 

528 Faulkner & Allston 

Aves 

529 Jones Ave 

531 Town Hall 

532 Congregational Church 

533 Middlesex Ave & 

Federal St 

534 Federal & Concord Streets 

535 Federal & Grant Sts 

536 Federal & Wilson Sts 

537 Federal & Lincoln Sts 

538 Federal & Pershing Sts 

539 Federal & Library Sts 

541 Federal & Woburn Sts 

542 Woburn & West Sts 

543 West & Kilmarnock Sts. 

545 Woburn St at 

R R Crossing 

546 Concord & Woburn Sts 
5461 Photon 

547 Concord St at Rte 93 
5471 Compugraphics. Concord St 
3472 Dynamics Research 
5474 General Eleitric 

54 7 5 Volkswagen 

5478 Machinist for 

E lectronics 

5479 Barbo 

548 Concord St at North 

Reading Line 

549 Woburn St at 281 

551 Middlesex & Mystic 

Aves 

551 1 Avco, North Wijmington 

5512 Photon, Inc 

5513 D F Munroe Paper Co 

5514 Waltham Door g. 

Window Co 

552 Middlesex Ave & Shady 

Lane Drive 
5521 Mytron Inc 

553 Shady Lane Drive & 

Oakdale Rd 

554 Shady Lane Drive & 

Birchwood Rd 

555 Shady Lane Drive & 

Sprucewood Rd, 

556 Pinewood & Oakdale 

Roads 

557 Birchwood & Judith Rds, 

558 Shady Lane Drive & 

Lawrence St 

61 1 No Wilmington 

Shopping Center 
61 2 Middlesex Ave & 

North St 

613 North St & 

Pineridge Rd 

614 North St & Marcia Rd. 

615 Middlesex Ave & 

High St 

616 Linda & Carolyn Rds 

617 High & Woburn Sts 

618 Woburn fli Park Sts 

619 Park St & Gowing Rd 

621 Gowing & Marcus Rds 

622 Park St at No Reading 

Line 



623 Middlewx Ave & 

Salem St 

624 Arlene & Catharint 

Aves 

625 Bartoara & Dorothy 

Aves. 

626 Salem St at 

R R Crossing 

627 Salem & Cunningham 

Streets 

628 Salam St & 

McDonald Rd 

629 McDonald Rd to End 

631 Royal St 

632 Salam St. at Tewksbury 

Line 

633 Salem & Ballardvale 

Streets 

634 Ballardvale St at 

Rte 125 

635 Ballardvale St st 

No 21 1 
5351 Charles River Breeding 
Laboratories 

636 Ballardvale St at 

No 326 

637 Ballardvale St at Andover 

Line 

638 Salem St at Rte 93 

639 Salem & Woburn Sts 

641 Woburn St & 

Hathaway Rd 

642 Hawthorne Rd. 

643 Hathaway & 

Sheridan Rds. 

644 Hathaway & Gunderson 

Roads 

645 Salem St & Thrush Rd. 

646 Thrush Rd & 

Marie Drive 

647 Salem St at North 

Reading Lme 

6471 Cronm s Pit 

6472 Benevento s Pit 

648 Woburn & Andover 

Streets 

6481 Pumping Station 

(Water Dept I 

6482 Alnswoith Road 

6483 Highway Dept 

649 AndoverSt & Rte 125 

651 Andover St at No 319 

652 Andover St at Andover 

Line 

SPECIAL SIGNALS 

1 Test 

2 All out (test 9 a m & 

9 p m.) 

3 Special Call 

4 Brush Fire 

5 Police Call 
666 Civil Defense 

7 Boy Scouts 
22 No School (6 30 a m , 
7 00 a m ) 

2 Followed by 3 rounds of 

box ■ second alarm 

3 Followed by 3 rounds of 

box general alarm 

MUTUAL AID 
(two rounds only) 
8 Out of Town 

81 To Andover 

82 To Billerica 

83 To Burlington 

84 To Lowell 

85 To No Raadmg 

86 To Reading 

87 To Tewksbury 

88 To Woburn 



FIRE - AMBULANCE 
EMERGENCY: 658^3200 

658-3346 



POLICE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3331 

658 5071 
658-5072 
935-5966 



TOWN HALL 

658-3311 
935-5596 



TOWN HALL ANNEX 
657-7511 

NO SCHOOL 658 9845 






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jf 

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The Benjamin Buck House. Home of one of the Wilmington officials 
who resisted the crown, in the days before the beginning of the 
Revolution. The house dates to 1671, and is the ancestral home of 
the Buck family in the United States. Named for an occupant, a 
Wilmington farmer who lived in the home c. 1800 - 1883. 







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The Eames House, ancestral home of the Eames family built in 
1723. There were many men in this family who participated in the 
events of the Revolutionary War. 




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The Butters Farm, in South Wilmington. Built about 1681, and the 
home of Wilmington Minutemen and others who fought in the 
Revolution. It was on this farm that the apple was developed which 
later became known as the Baldwin Apple. 



^ouin Printing ^nc. ^^^^^^ ^Andover, YtjaMackuietis 




WILMINGTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



3 2136 00199 7646 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room